The Fall of Rome: And the End of Civilization

Predný obal
Oxford University Press, 2005 - 239 strán (strany)
10 Recenzie
Was the fall of Rome a great catastrophe that cast the West into darkness for centuries to come? Or, as scholars argue today, was there no crisis at all, but simply a peaceful blending of barbarians into Roman culture, an essentially positive transformation?
In The Fall of Rome, eminent historian Bryan Ward-Perkins argues that the "peaceful" theory of Rome's "transformation" is badly in error. Indeed, he sees the fall of Rome as a time of horror and dislocation that destroyed a great civilization, throwing the inhabitants of the West back to a standard of living typical of prehistoric times. Attacking contemporary theories with relish and making use of modern archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of everyday Romans, who were caught in a world of economic collapse, marauding barbarians, and the rise of a new religious orthodoxy. The book recaptures the drama and violence of the last days of the Roman world, and reminds us of the very real terrors of barbarian occupation. Equally important, Ward-Perkins contends that a key problem with the new way of looking at the end of the ancient world is that all difficulty and awkwardness is smoothed out into a steady and positive transformation of society. Nothing ever goes badly wrong in this vision of the past. The evidence shows otherwise.
Up to date and brilliantly written, combining a lively narrative with the latest research and thirty illustrations, this superb volume reclaims the drama, the violence, and the tragedy of the fall of Rome.

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Prehľad pre používateľa  - jerry-book - LibraryThing

Does the absence of pottery, roof tiles, coinage, and the lack of literacy prove the fall of Rome was also the fall of civilization. This author makes a convincing case that the Dark Ages were in fact a miserable time to be alive. It was not a simple bucolic existence that some have claimed. Čítať celú recenziu

LibraryThing Review

Prehľad pre používateľa  - nandadevi - LibraryThing

The author appears to be quite at ease (and persuasive) arguing against the notion that the end of the Western Roman Empire was a gentle affair. He uses quite specific examples from every part of that ... Čítať celú recenziu

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O tomto autorovi (2005)

Bryan Ward-Perkins is a lecturer in Modern History at the University of Oxford, and Fellow and Tutor in History at Trinity College. His research concentrates on the period of transition from the Roman world to that of the Middle Ages (circa 300-700 A.D.), above all in the Mediterranean region.He has published widely on the subject and is a co-editor of The Cambridge Ancient History.

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