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Rose's Parkhurst. Robinson, 1834. Robinson, 1850. Suggested. perous, fortunate, Acts 11: 24.

So B) of things, ac- tempers, righteous happy, Isaiah lxiii. Sept. for zin 2 Chr. tions, good, right, words acts, 7. Job xvii. 15. 21: 13. Prov. 13: 2, upright, e. g. kapdía (espec. in the neut., 1 Macc. X. 55. and where åyalóg is op- Luke 8, 15; &vtokú virtue :) Matt. 5: cheerful, Ps. lxxiii. posed to trapávouos. Rom. 7. 12; Cóyos 45; 8: 15; 12: 34, 14. Zach. viii. 19. 15: 3. Is. 63: 7 kpl. 2 Thess. 2, 17; Jé 35 thrice; 19: 16 Esdr. ix. 12. In Tùs åyaðóç for 59 12, 2.

anua toŨ 9. Rom. last clause ; 22:10; Sirach xiii. 25. кар

(Sept. 25: 21, 23; Luke 6: địa ép ủyafo@s is me.–Xen. Mem. Tv qua đY. for 45 thrive; 19: 17; perhaps for Kapdía 3. 4. 8 TOÙS KAKOùs in Neh. 9, 20. 23:50; John 6: 29; αγαθή in this KONAČELV kai tous Psa. 143, 10. Wisd. 7: 12; Acts 11: 24; sense.]

So Hero- αγάθους τιμών. . 8, 19 Lux Gr.) 23: 1; Rom. 2: 7, dotus, lib. iii. cap. b) of things. (a) Hence συνείδησις 10; 3: 8; δ: 7; 7: 135, and ix. 8ì, in a physical sense, åyarn a good con- 12, 13 twice; '18: used not only by e. g. dévopov Matt. science, conscious- 19; 9. 11; 12: 2, the LXX, but like- 7: 17, 18. yñ Luke ness of rectitude, 9; 13: 3; 14: 16; wise by Polybius, 8: 8. So Sept. Acts 23, 1. 1 Tim. 16: 19; 2 Cor. 5: Xenophon, and Jo- ay, for Ex. 3: 1, 5. 19. 1 Pet. 3, 10; Eph. 2: 10; 4: sephus, (cited by 8.-Diod. Sic. 11. 16. 21. Also 28; 6: 8; Col. 1: Kape on Luke xii. 25 xupa ởY. Xen. & pr 0 9 2 y 29 6 9, 10; 2 Thess. 2: 17; 19,) and by the Dec. 16. 7 úy.-ě pya Y Z 9 á, 1 Tim. 1: 5, 19; 2: two latter particu- (6) in a moral good deeds, well-do 10; 5: 10; 2 Tim. larly applied to the sense, good, up- ing, uprightness, 2: 21; 3: 17; Tit. Fruits of the earth. right, virtuous; e.g. Rom. 2, 7. 13, 3. 1: 16; 2: 10; 3: 1: [in which sense it kapdía Luke 8: 15. Eph. 2, 10. Col. 1, Philem. 6; Heb. 13: occurs, Gen. xlv. ÉVTOÀN Rom. 7: 12. 10. 2 Tim. 2, 21. 21; 1 Pet. 3: 11, 13, 20. Wisdom ü. 6. Tóyoc 2 Thess. 2: 17. al. Sept. Tolmuara 16 twice, 21. Sept. Luke xii. 18, 19.] 8éAmua Toũ 6. Rom. tr. for so I Sam. Prov. 13: 2; Wisd.

II. Bountiful,kind, 12: 2, and so Sept. 19, 4. Wisd. 3, 15 8: 19; 1 Sam. 19: benevolent, merciful. for sing with Tò móvol ủy.

4.-Xen. Mem. III, Mat. xx. 15. [Boun- tveŪua Neh. 9: 20. c) Neut as Subst. iv, 8, Toùc đY. Tuu. tiful or liberal, i. e. Psa. 143: 10. Wisd. (ro) uyagóv, () b.Relat., estimable, Does my liberality 8: 19 puxh úy. ủyalú, good, good i. e. prized for parto others provoke Hence ovvednols things, right, virtue, ticular reasons of you to envy? See ủyaon, i. e. con- Matt. 12, 34. 35. an outward chaXenoph. Cyr. iii. sciousness of recti- 19, 16. Luke 6, 45. racter. 3, 4. and D’Orvill. tude, Acts 23: 1. Rom. 2, 10. 7, 18, (1) In a merely ad Charit. p. 722.] 1 Tim. 1: 5, 19. 19. al. Rom. 7, 13 natural sense, valuRom. v.7. [Kind or 1 Pet. 3: 16, 21.- ủyađóv that able, e. g. goods, i. e. benevolent. 1 Thess. So špya yavú, which is in itself moveable property: iii. 6. Good natur- good deeds, virtue, good. 14, 16 yuảv Luke 12: 18, 19. ed. 1 Pet. ii. 18. rectitude, Rom. 2:7. To iyaŭóv your Sept. Gen. 24: 10.Tit. ii. 5. See Ca- 13: 3. Eph. 2: 10. good, sc. liberty of Xen. Cyr. III, iii, saub. Epp. p. 79. Col. 1: 10. 2 Tim. conscience, Chris- 20. Xen. Econ. 11. 6. 2: 21. 3: 17. Tit. 1: tian liberty. Sept. (2) In a moral Hence Tò uyalòv 16. 3: 1. Heb. 13: forains Psa. 53, 2. sense. denotes benevolence. 21. So Sept. for 4.-Arr. Epict. 1. a) Genr., kind, 1 Thess. v. 15. Rom. ing 1 Sam. 19: 4 4. 1. Sen. Mem. 3.. whether of persons, xii. 21. Gal. vi. 10. mohuara úy. Wisd. 10. 5.

dispositions, Phil. i. 5. Philem. 3: 15 móvoi ay. 2. good, in re things conferred, 14. It is put for c) neut. ủyađóv spect to operation, as evincing bene Christianity as the and dyadi, i. e. influence, utility, volence, (espec. in highest instance of virtue, rectitude, love i. e. useful, benefi- the neut, blessings, God's benevolence of virtue, Matt. 12: cial, profitable. either temporal or in Rom. xiv. 16.] 34, 35, 19:16. Luke a) of persons, spiritual:) Matt. 7:

III. Profitable,use- 6: 45. John 5: 29. good, kind," benevo- 11 twice; 20: 15; ful, Eph. iv. 29. Rom. 2: 10.3: 8. lent, doing good, Luke 1: 53; 11: 13;

IV. Fertile, good, 7: 18, 19. 9: 11. 12: Rom. 5, 7. 1 Thess. 16: 25; Acts 9:36; aş land. Luke viii. 9. 13: 3. 16: 19. 3, 6. Tit. 2, 5. Rom. 8: 28; 10: 15; 8. So Plutarch, De 2 Cor. 5: 10, 1 Pet. 1 Pet. 2, 18. Sept. 12: 21; 13: 4; 16:

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Rose's Parkhurst, Robinson, 1834. Robinsoti, 1850. Suggested. lib. educand. p. 2. 3: 11, 13. 3 John for zin 2 Chr. 30, 2; 2 Cor. 9: 8; Gal. 'En rñs yeupyias, 11. Rom. 7: 13 bis 19 8 Jeòs iy. Poram 6: 10; 1 Thess. 3: πρώτον μεν 'ΑΓΑ το αγαθόν

that 73, 1.-Plut. Con- 6; 5: 15; Tit. 2: 5: O‘HN Únápčal del which is in itself sol. ad Apoll. 37. Philem. 14; Heb. 9: TÌv rñv. In agri- good. Rom. 14: 16 Xen. Cyr. 3. 3. 4 11; 10: 1; Jamer culture, first, the where tò ủyadov is cvepyéTNU, Tòv úvopa 1: 17; 3:17; 1 Pet. land must be good. the good cause, i. e. Tòv Nyalóv. 2: 18; 3 John 11.

V. Pure, unpol- the religion of b) of things ; Sept. 2 Chr. 30: luted. Acts xxii. 1. Christ. Sept. for e. g. dóuara Matt. 19; Neh. 9: 13.(comp. Acts xxiv. in Psa. 34: 14. 7, 11. Luke 11, 13; Xen. Cyr. III, iii, 16. 2 Tim. i. 3.) 53: 2, 4.-Xen. dóols James 1, 17; 4,=Evepyétny; ib. I Tim. i. 19. (comp. Mem. 3. 10. 5. åvaorpnoń 1 Pet. 3, IV, ü, 8. 1 Tim. üii. 9.) 3. good, in respect 16; kaproí James b) Specifically.

to operation or in- 3, 17; Miotis Tit. [1] With respect fluence on others, 2, 10.-(Sept. for to a certain purpos i. e. useful, benefi- ging 1 Sam. 12, 23 or relation, servicecial, profitable. đY. 88óc. Neh. 9, 13 able, i. e. suitable

a) of persons, évtonai áy.) Matt. or adapted : Gal. 6: benevolent, benefi- 12, 35 åy. Inoavpós, 6; Eph. 4: 29.-30 cent, Matt. 20: 15. treasure of good Jos. Ant. IV, vi, Rom. 5: 7. 1 Thess. things. Luke 6. 45. l, móhis polvikas 3: 6. Titus 2: 5. 8o špya uyalú, good pépelv åyaon; Parr1 Pet. 2: 18. So deeds, benefits, Acts san. Eliac. post. c. Sept. for zing 2 Chr. 9, 36. 2 Cor. 9, 8. xxvi, 4. 30: 19 ó poc úy. 1 Tim. 2, 10. 5, 10. [2] In view of Psa. 73: 1.-Xen. -Also good for any advantage accruing Cyr. 3. 3. 4 Evepré- purpose,

suitable, to the subject, hap TIIV, Tòv dvopa Tòv adapted to, Eph. 4, py, e. g. a lot or αγαθόν. Τhuc. 1. 29 λόγος αγ. προς process fraught 86.

oikodouñv. Rom. 15, with blissful re b) of things; e. g. 2. So Jos. Ant. 4. sults, a joyful state, douara Matt. 7: 11. 6. 1 nóhis polvikas prosperous

times : Luke 11: 13. dools Pépeiv åyan. Pau; Luke 10: 42; Phil. James 1: 17. čpyov san. Eliac. post. C. 1: 6; 1 Thess. 2: Phil. 1: 6. αναστρο- 26. 4 χώρα ές καρ- 16; 1 Ρet. 3: 10.-on 1 Pet. 3: 16. ToÙS ÉKTPÉDEL ủya- Sept. Psa. 34: 12; kaptol James 3: 17. Un. Plut. Sept. Eccles. 14: 14; HeTlotis Tit. 2: 10. Sap. Conv. 14, p. rod. iii, 135; ix. 81. Sept. forsio 1 Sam. 367.

Plato Rep. (3) Putatively, 12: 23 αγ. οδός. 608. e.

respected, e. g. emiNeb. 9: 13 évtonai c) Neut. as Subst. nent in official chaảy.—Matt. 12: 35 å yao óv, 'racter, revered reliđY Sneappóc, treo- something useful giously: Matt. 19: sure of good things. and profitable, u 16 first clause, 17 Luke 6: 45.-So benefit, Rom. 8, 28. twice ; Mark 10: žpya iyavá, good 12, 21. 13, 4. Gal. 17, 18 twice; Luke deeds, benefits, Acts 6, 10. Eph. 4, 28. 18: 18, 19 twice; 9: 36. 2 Cor. 9: 8. 6, 8. 1 Thess. 5, 16. John 1: 47.- Jos. 1 Tim. 2: 10. 5: 10. Philem. 6.14. (Xen. Ant. IX, V, 2; Xen.

- In the sense of Cyr. 4. 2. 18.) Plur. Ven. i, 14.
suitable, adapted to, uyau á, things
Eph. 4: 29 hóyos good and useful,
ày. após oikodounu benefits, blessings,
Rom. 15: 2.-Jos. Matt. 7, 11. Luke
Ant. 4. 6. 1 mókus 1, 53. 16, 25. Rom.
polvikas pépelv ủya- 3, 8. Gal. 6, 6. Heb.
in. Pausan. Eliac. 9, 11. 10, 1. (Plut.
poster. C. 26. 4 Pericl. 39. Xen.
χώρα ές καρπούς Cyr. 5. 3. 1β τους
εκτρέφειν αγαθή. . ευεργετούντας άγα-

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Robinson, 1834. Robinson, 1850.

c) neut. (α) το θοϊς υπερβαλλόμε-
åyatov, something you.) In the sense
useful and profit- of goods, wealth,
able, benefit, Rom. Luke 12, 18. 19.
8: 28. 12:21. 13:4. Sept. for 377 Gen.
Gal. 6: 10. Eph. 4: 24, 10. Deut. 6, 11.
28. 6: 8. 1 Thess. So Xen. Cyr. 3.
5: 15. Philem. 6: 3. 20.
14.-Xen. Cyr. 4. 3. good, in re-
2. 18.(B) ảya- spect to the feel-
, things good and ings excited, i. e.
useful, benefits, bless- glad, joyful, happy.
ing8. Matt. 7: 11. 1 Pet. 3, 10 nuépas
Luke 1: 53. 16: 25. ay. Rom. 10, 15
Gal. 6: 6. Heb. 9: ảyada happy
11. 10: 1.-Xen. times. 2 Thess. 2,
Cyr. 5. 3. 15 tous 16. Sept. for min
ευεργετούντας άγα- Psa. 34, 12 ημέρας
θούς υπερβαλλόμε- αγ. Zech. 8, 19
vol. In the sense opràc ảy. So Ec-
of goods, wealth, clus. 14, 14.-1 Macc.
Luke 12: 18, 19. 10, 55.
So Sept. for 37
Gen. 24: 10. 45: 18,
20. Deut. 6: 11.-
Xen. Cyr. 3. 3. 20.

4. good, in re-
spect to the feel-
ings excited, i. e.
pleasant, joyful,
happy. 1 Pet. 3: 10
huếpac đY. Rom. 10:
15 τα αγαθά happy
times. Sept. for

in Psa. 34: 12 quépac ủy. Zech. 8: 19 εορτάς αγ.-Ecclus. 14: 14. 1 Macc. 10: 55.

The above will at least illustrate the difficulty of this part of Dr. Robinson's undertaking. It is almost impossible to preserve entirely distinct the different senses which a word takes on, for each meaning assumes almost as many shades as the number of instances in which it occurs. Whatever profound learning, diligent toil, and minute accuracy can accomplish for a work, has evidently been done for this by its author; and the publishers have brought it out in a style that does credit even to their enterprising press. It has no need of our feeble recommendation: it is above our praise; and the wants of students must combine with its intrinsic deserts to render it at once the book for the American, and probably also the English, public.

ART. VIII.-SHORT REVIEWS AND NOTICES OF BOOKS.

(1.) WHEREVER the Divinity of Christ is denied, human depravity is denied also. Our readers who wish to see the full tendency of Socinian doctrine, may find it in “ Discourses on the Rectitude of Human Nature, by GEORGE W. BURNAP, D. D., Pastor of the First Independent. Church of Baltimore:” (Boston: Crosby & Nichol, 1850: 12mo., pp. 409.) Dr. Burnap believes that theology is altogether behind the other sciences; that the modes of reasoning which prevail upon it are such as would be wholly unsatisfactory in any

other branch of human knowledge. His contribution to a “ thorough revision” of theology consists in these twenty-four Discourses, designed to prove that human nature-not as it was originally created, but in its actual, positive, historical presence on the earth—is essentially pure; that Adam was not the federal head, but the symbolic type, of mankind; that the Scripture account of the fall is an Oriental apologue designed to show, not how all men fell in Adam, but how every man falls for himself; that the general sinfulness of mankind is the fruit of human freedom and of human ignorance, aggravated by the law of habit, by the outward circumstances of a state of probation, &c. In short, these lectures give a summary of all the arguments commonly brought against original sin. We do not see that Dr. Burnap has added anything new to the stock, and are inclined to the opinion that the “new revision" of theology will require methods different from his to insure it success.

(2.) THAT “the former times were better than these,” is a cry repeated in every generation. Methodism, of course, bas had its croakers also; signs of degeneracy have been seen in abundance, by acute, fault-finding eyes; and predictions of decay, and even of ruin, have not been wanting. A sufficient answer to all such will be found in “The Present State, Prospects, and Responsibilities of the Methodist Episcopal Church, by NATHAN BANGS, D. D.;" (New-York: Lane & Scott, 1850: 18mo., pp. 326.) The healthful tone of Dr. Bangs' pages—the pages of a veteran, who, according to the usual course of things, might be expected to grumble at the times, or, at least, might be excused for it if any one could-contrasts strongly with the morbid, complaining spirit so often shown in younger men. Not that he is blind to existing defects, or afraid to speak of them; we only wish that every one else, who has the right to be, were as free in speaking out his mind. But with his eyes wide open, and with the experience of his long life of work to aid his vision, he sees the signs of healthful progress, of natural and consistent growth, everywhere manifest in the Church-in her zeal for the education of the people, in her devotion to the cause of missions, and in her love for vital religion. After supporting his hopeful and cheering view of the state of the Church by a great variety of facts and arguments, he sets forth the true means of preserving and increasing this perpetuity--namely, the holiness of the Church ;-that is, the holiness of the individual members of the Church and the spirit of union and activity that holiness necessarily inspires. We trust that the book will be widely read, and will be useful, not merely in strengthening the confidence, but in reviving the zeal, of Methodists.

The Appendix of ecclesiastical statistics, though brief, is very comprehensive and valuable.

(3.) No book of reference has appeared of late years with greater claims to a place on every library-table than “ The World's Progress, a Dictionary of Dates, with Tabular Views of General History, and a Historical Chart, edited by G. P. PUTNAM:" (New-York: G. P. Putnam, 1850.) The work is a large 12mo., of nearly seven hundred pages, full of facts, so arranged and classified as to be always easily found. The first division (illustrated by a chart of history on Priestley's plan) contains tabular views of universal history in parallel columns, bringing the chronology down to 1850. Next follows a dictionary of dates, (more properly of facts,) founded on Haydn's; and after this is given a chronological list of authors. The work concludes with a pretty copious biographical Index. This enumeration of the contents of the book is enough to commend it to all those who, like ourselves, feel the need of every sort of time-saving help in literary labour.

(4.) “ Popular Education, for the Use of Parents and Teachers, by IRA MAYHEW, A. M., late Superintendent of Public Instruction in the State of Michigan:" (New-York: Harper & Brothers, 1850: 12mo., pp. 467.) Well-written books of this class cannot be multiplied too much. The work before us grew out of a series of lectures delivered before the Legislature of Michigan-now collected and published at the request of that body. We are glad to see that several chapters are devoted to physical education, a matter in which the Americans, as a people, are far behind the European world. We commend the work, not merely as a useful manual for teachers and school committees, but as one to be read by the people--every man, woman, and child of whom is interested in the subject of which it treats.

(5.) MESSRS. LANE & Scott have just issued a new edition of “ Mental Discipline, with Reference to the Acquisition and Communication of Knowledge, and to Education generally, by Rev. DAVIS W. CLARK, D. D.:" (18mo., pp. 320.) This book by no means aims to give a theory of the human mind, but simply to unfold some of the laws of its development, and to give simple and practical rules for its cultivation. It has specially in view the wants of students for the Christian ministry--and particularly of those, we suppose, whose means of early education have been limited. To all such, its lessons must be invaluable—and, indeed, it has claims to even a wider sphere of influence. Appended to the work is a topical course of Theological Study, with references to books under each head. The list of names is purposely narrow-too much so, we think, for the present state of culture in our Church.

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