The Search for Roots: A Personal Anthology

Predný obal
Ivan R. Dee, 2002 - 233 strán (strany)
It is not my job to explain why...the reader who wishes can enter the passage and cast an eye on the ecosystem that lodges unsuspected in my depths, saprophytes, birds of day and night, creepers, butterflies, crickets, and fungi. Primo Levi emerged not only as one of the most profound and haunting commentators on the Holocaust but also as a great writer on many twentieth-century themes. Here is an anthology of writings that he considered to be essential reading. As Peter Forbes says in his Introduction, In the context of the twenty-first century, all of Levi’s choices are striking; they exhibit a kind of chastened curiosity rare in our time, and an undiminished sense of wonder and horror at a universe that has such things in it. Most of the pieces, as Levi comments, reflect the fundamental dichotomies that face us all. Many have their roots in Levi’s experience of Auschwitz, and in their startling juxtaposition they give the impression of a world turned upside down. One of the most important Italian writers.—Umberto Eco.

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Prehľad pre používateľa  - suesbooks - LibraryThing

This book disappointed me because I have so much liked his other writings more than what he chooses to read. I appreciated the introduction to a variety of writing, and re-reading some that I read, but I found many to be tedious and boring. Čítať celú recenziu

LibraryThing Review

Prehľad pre používateľa  - ChrisWarren - LibraryThing

An ecclectic collection full of despair and inspiration. Themes of pride as a sin, pride as a virtue, stoicism, patience and humour pepper this book. Čítať celú recenziu

Obsah

Preface
3
The Book of Job Bible
11
Homer New Coasts and Poseidons Son
22
Autorské práva

22 zvyšných častí nezobrazených

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O tomto autorovi (2002)

Born in 1919 in Turin, Italy, Primo Levi was the son of an educated middle-class Jewish family. He became a research chemist and in December 1943 was arrested as part of the anti-fascist resistance and deported to Auschwitz. After the war, Levi resumed his career as a chemist, retiring only in 1975. His graphic account of his time in Auschwitz, If This Is a Man, was published in 1957, and he went on to write many other books, including If Not Now, When? and The Periodic Table, emerging not only as one of the most profound and haunting commentators on the Holocaust but also as a great writer on many twentieth-century themes. In 1987 he died in a fall that is widely believed to have been suicide.

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