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BY THE WAY The elevator boy of the New York G apartment house is often weary and indi posed to answer questions. A woman, a cording to “Harper's,” said to one of the little potentates : " If any one calls, Lou while I am out, tell him to wait. I shall | right back.” There was no answer. “D you hear me? Why don't you answer asked the woman, with some indignatio “I never answers, ma'am,” he responde wearily, “unless I doesn't hear, and then

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1917

PATENTED

The Refill Shaving Stick

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You needn't buy a
new razor every time
your blade gets dull

That beneficent insect the ladybu otherwise known as “ladybird, “lad

• clock,” and, in Ireland, as

« God's cow was mentioned in this column lately. subscriber writes :

You may be interested to know that the cottony cushion scale, one of our orange pests here in California, is absolutely controlled by ladybird beetles, and that the young of other scales are also eaten by them. We find the ladsbirds in great masses in our mountain canyons where they breed, and whence they migrate to the valley. I got about $50 worth from a colony which I found, scooping most of them up by double handfuls. I am told they ship them into Imperial Valley in carloads to pro tect the cantaloups from the aphis.

Nor do you have to buy a new metal
“Handy Grip" when your Shaving Stick is
used up. Buy a Colgate “Refill"-screw it
into your old “Handy Grip”-and continue
to enjoy shaving economy.
And remove and moisten the stub, press
it upon the tip of the new stick, and thus
use all the soap.
Avoid mussy rubbing in with the fingers by shaving
with Colgate's. The lather works up quickly, soft.
ening the toughest beard, without the necessity of
making a ading board of your face.
The Shaving Stick is the economical way to
make a satisfactory lather. We can give you
this impartial advice because we make Shaving
Sticks, Powder and Cream. Send 4c for trial size
of any of these

COLGATE & CO.
Dept. Z
199 Fulton St.

New York

“NO NIGHT THERE”

One Book for Sunday School and Church.

(The “City Four-Square") A beautiful Sacred song for Church or Home

50c per copy postpaid The Biglow & Main Co., 156 5th Ave., N. Y.

For the preventing of automobile acc dents a writer in the New York “ Evenin Post” makes this novel suggestion : “L our traffic laws forbid the use of the hoi or signal in city streets.” This, he claim would put the burden of not hitting pede

trians entirely on drivers. “The presen COLGATE&CO

practice of the average driver is to rely o the horn for scattering people-worse la

to him or her who doesn't jump quic STICK

enough. I can drive an automobile from

one end of New York City to the othe TI!

without using my horn once and witho
jeopardizing any one. Of course this pre
cludes my making fire-engine speed, bu
is this necessary ? The most the driver ca

lose is time, but the pedestrian may los
HYMNS for TODAY his life.”
Forward Looking Music and Orders of Service.
Sample sent for Examination.

Among modern inventions that mak
Fillmore Music House, 530 Elm St., Cincinnati, O.

for comfort a subscriber lists as two of th

most important the capsules now used fo HONOR ROLLS

disagreeable medicines, and the wire scree

used to protect our houses from disagree HISTORICAL TABLETS able insects. Quinine, he says, was in th

days of the Civil War the great medicin 20 POT BULBS 25c

of the Army, and it was taken by the tea

spoonful with nothing to disguise its bitter Purity Freesia, 2 Double Rose

All that is past.” The well-screene bud, 3 Buttercup, 2 Bowi and 6 Grand Duchess Oxalis. These house, with its freedom from mosquitoe

20 bulbs and Catalog MAILED FOR 25 CENTS

and flies, was unknown to “the good ol Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcis. days,” and it alone is enough to mak Phloxes, Hardy Plants,

modern life worth the living. Shrubs, Vines, Berries, in window plants for winter. Seeds for Fall sowing, etc, Bargaining in the East is well described Large beautiful Catalog free in “When I was a Boy in Persia.” A cus John Lewis Chiids, Inc.

tomer will ask the price of an article. The Floral Park, N.Y.

merchant will say, "Five dollars," adding

* ” 66 Allah! the article is free.” The cus tomer says, “I die! What is the real

price?” “In Allah's name," the dealer Established 1310 110 Years of Making

replies, “I cannot give it to you for any Good Brushes

less." “My father and grandfather!' Replaced foreign brushes in the

pleads the customer; can you not be reaU.S. in 1812, and became soon the

sonable? Your price is too high.” “I am leading manufacturers of Brushes in the United States. Later, and now,

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your sacrifice,” says the dealer ; the largest manufacturers of Brushes in the world. Excellent quality; in

will you give me for it?” “Two dollars, and finite variety of all kinds of Brushes.

that is more than it is worth.” “What!!' shouts the merchant; “do you think I

found it? Feel it, feel it, see how fine it John L. Whiting-J. J. Adams Co., Boston, U.S.A.

is! Now what will you give me for it?" “No, no,” says the customer; “I see I

66 what

>

Send for Illustrated Literature

Brush Manufacturers for Over 110 Years and

the Largest in the World

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Dit do business with you; I must try edzie one else.” He drops the goods and ter 18 to leave. Before he has gone

far the 5. jpkeeper shouts, "I will give it to you aid three dollars—no less." The customer

THE SHOE THAT HOLDS ITS SHAPE irns and after some further dickering $7.00 $8.00 $9.00 & $10.00 SHOES

$ article is sold at about half the asked e. If the sale is not effected the mer

FOR MEN AND WOMEN nt in his wrath will sometimes seize a **k and drive his patron from his door, YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY WEARING

$9.00 W. L. DOUGLAS SHOES

SHOE "Ling, “ Away with you, kopak (dog)!” be

hebest known The passing of the bibulous night-war

shoes in the r is thus hit off by a Southern

BOYS paper:

world. They are

SHOES rohibition has at least reduced the num

sold in 107 W.L.

$4.50 $5.00 Asbe of men who think they can sing.”

Douglas stores,

and $5.50

direct from the factory to you at un Chis unusual advertisement clipped from hicago paper tells quite as much about the

only one profit, which guarantees vertiser as about the subject advertised :

to you the best shoes that can be

produced, at the lowest possible LOCAL AND PERSONAL A child for sale. Beautiful girl, 4 years of

cost. W. L. Douglas name and 3dge; blue eyes and auburn hair; excellent

the retail price are stamped on sealth and charming disposition. Legitimate

the bottom of all shoes before mparentage. The high cost of living reason for

they leave the factory, which is helling. Address etc.

your protection against unreasongefurther contributions to “topsy-turvy

able profits. thonunciations :

W. L. Douglas $9.00 and $10.00 shoes are A colored woman told me her brother

absolutely the best shoe values for the d suffered so dreadfully, from a broken

money in this country. They are made of

the best and finest leathers that money ne that they had to give him an epiEmic injunction every night.''

can buy. They combine quality, style,

workmanship and wearing qualities equal " A patient in the hospital here attrib

to other makes selling at higher prices. ed her condition to nervous breakdown

They are the leaders in the fashion centers d insumonia.'

of America. The stamped price is W.L.

Douglas personal guarantee that the shoes From The Copper Kettle :",

are always worth the price paid for them. » Physician—" This man's condition is not

The prices are the same everywhere; they nie to drink. He's been drugged.”

cost no more in San Francisco than they

do in New York. Policeman (turning pale and speaking -nidly- “ I'm afraid ye're right, sir. I

W. L. Douglas shoes are made by the ugged him all the way—a matter of a

highest paid, skilled shoemakers, under mindred yards or more.'

the direction and supervision of experi

enced men, all working with an honest 1"Our Irish domestic spoke of the sec

determination to make the best shoes for On' (sexton) of the church, said of a snub

G

the price that money can buy. osed baby that it had a 'plug' (pug) nose,

W. L. Douglas shoes are for sale by over 9000 shoe dealer ad referred proudly to her Cansistors

besides ourown stores. If your local dealer cannot supply iccent on sis).”

you, take no other make. Order direct from factory. Send

for booklet telling how to order shoes by mail, postagefree. "The following are examples of mis

President CAUTION.—Insist upon having W.L.Doug. rints doubtless due to hurried pronuncialas shoes. The name and price is plainly

W.L.Douglas Shoe Co., on of words by editors or copyholders : stamped on the sole. Be careful to see

167. Spark Street, that it has not been changed or mutilated.

Brockton, Mass. a Mackenzie King's book Industry and lumanity, Cynicalism (Syndicalism), ocialism, Anarchism.'In house rgan 'Govmnor. Strong, in his forceful, inimical yle.' In Wages in Wartime,'' A comlication of budgetary studies. In an Illi

Cash payment, from $1 to $5, will promptly be made to our readers who ois sociological journal, “The immortality send us a cartoon or photograph accepted by The Outlook. f several women was questioned.'”

We want to see the best cartoons published in your local papers, and Here are a few samples of movie fun, the most interesting and newsy pictures you may own. Read carefully rom “ Screen Smiles :"

the coupons below for conditions governing payment. Then fill in the “Does bigamy mean that a man has one

coupon, paste it on the back of the cartoon or print, and mail to us. "No, not necessarily; a man can have THE EDITORS OF THE OUTLOOK, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York mne wife too many and not be a bigamist.” - Mistress—“ Did you water the ferns in To the Cartoon Editor of The Outlook :

To the Photograph Editor of The Outlook : he drawing-room, Norah ?”

The attached cartoon is clipped from the

The attached photograph is the property of Maid—“ Yes, mum. Don't you hear the

the undersigned and is submitted for publicavater drippin' on the carpet?”

of the following

tion in The Outlook, Postage is enclosed for

its return if unavailable. It is my underMaggie_" The garbage man is here, sor.”

standing that The Outlook agrees to pay $3 date

If this particular

for this photograph if reproduced as a halfclipping is selected for reproduction in The Professor (from deep thought)—“ Tell Outlook, I will accept One Dollar as payment

page cut, or smaller, and $5 if reproduced in him we don't want any to-day.” in full for my service in bringing it to your

larger size than a half page. The ei losed

brief account of the object or event depicted attention. I agree that if it is not used it will not be returned nor its receipt acknowledged.

you may use as you see fit. From “ Lustige Blaetter,” of Berlin: At the Railway Station.-She—“ Have Name.

Name.. ve everything here? What is in the small box?” He—« The wardrobe.” “And in Address..

Address.... che large one?” “Our paper money.”

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team of the Federal Regerve BankA Cash Offer for Cartoons and Photographs

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" The Most-Quoted Magazine in America

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Im'lzcrazy wit my work and other aunoyances at this muuta.

Yours always tarly

My dear Panizza.

my

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The Outlook was last month probably the mostquoted magazine in America.

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CARTER

INX PRODUCTS

Excerpt from letter to Sir Anthony Panizzi from W.M. Thackeray

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WOULD Thackeray's "other annoyances" have in

cluded the persistent irritation of poor ink? We know that ink can be extremely annoying. Make this experiment. Have the ink-well washed cleanto clear away any old sediment, which would otherwise affect the new ink. Then fill the clean well with Carter's Writing Fluid. In no other way can you so fully realize the helpfullness of good ink-the clear, rich blue and free, even Aow which makes writing a pleasure. Try this before you sign to-day's mail, or take in hand your personal correspondence--and see how much better the letter looks.

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No sooner had the August. 18th issue appeared than newspapers began wiring us for permission to reprint the notable interview with Senator Harding on labor.

The Chicago Tribune reprinted the interview in full, featuring it in front-page first-column position, in its issue of August 17th.

The New York Times, New York Tribune, New York Sun and Herald, Springfield Republican, Detroit Free Press, Omaha Bee, and many other leading dailies promptly passed this Outlook interview on to their readers in whole or in large part.

The aggressive timeliness of The Outlook is just one of the

many

characteristics that make it necessary to business executives and professional men, and that place it first on the list of many of the most careful national advertis

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The Outlook Company 381 Fourth Ave., New York City

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The Outlook

Copyright, 1920, by The Outlook Company

THE SHOE THAT HOLDS ITS SHAPE $7.00 $8.00 $9.00 & $10.00 SHOES

FOR MEN AND WOMEN 'YO YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY WEARING

W. L. DOUGLAS SHOES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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THE OUTLOOK 18 PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE OUTLOOK COMPANY, 381 FOURTH AVENUE, NEW YORK. LAWRENCE P. ABBOTT, PRESIDENT. N. T. PULSIFER, VICE-PRESIDENT. FRANK C. HOYT, TREASURER. ERNEST II. ABBOTT, SECNETARY. TRAVERS D. CARMAN, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

he bestknown
shoes in the

BOYS world. They are

SHOES sold in 107 W.L.

$450 $5.00 Douglas stores,

and $5.50 direct from the factory to you at only one profit, which guarantees to you the best shoes that can be produced, at the lowest possible cost. W. L. Douglas name and the retail price are stamped on the bottom of all shoes before they leave the factory, which is your protection against unreason. able profits. W. L. Douglas $9.00 and $10.00 shoes are absolutely the best shoe values for the money in this country. They are made of the best and finest leathers that money can buy. They combine quality, style, workmanship and wearing qualities equal to other makes selling at higher prices. They are the leaders in the fashion centers of America. The stamped price is W. L. Douglas personal guarantee that the shoes are always worth the price paid for them. The prices are the same everywhere; they cost no more in San Francisco than they do in New York. W. L. Douglas shoes are made by the highest paid, skilled shoemakers, under the direction and supervision of experienced men, all working with an honest determination to make the best shoes for the price that money can buy.

Co-Responsibility versus Syndicalism. 175 A Bon Marcheur'

175 The Aaland Islands ..

176 Murder by Wholesale..

176 The Five Socialists Return and Depart 176 The Primary Battle in Illinois....... 177 The Nominations in New York and Connecticut..

177 A Safety Margin for Suffrage.... 178 American Ships for American Goods 178 We Say a Good Word for the Post Office Department..

178 Cartoons of the Week..

-179 The Jenny Lind Centenary...

180 An Accounting with the Steward. 180 Talking Red and Seeing Red..

181 Three Plays.

182 For New York Dyspeptics Only..... 183 Parliament and Treasury on Trial: Soviets in England ......

184 Special Correspondence by Frank Dilnot 11-Britain's Credit...

185 Special Correspondence by P. W. Wilson A New Lincoln Statue and a Lincoln Story

186 By M. C. de K. Knoll Papers : God's Way of Doing Things'

187 By Lyman Abbott Current Events Jllustrated ...

188 Painless Taxation : Is an “ Employer's Privilege Tax” Practicable ?....... 190

By Theodore H. Price
Harding and Cox as Seen by Associates :

A First-Hand Study of the Presiden-
tial Candidates in Their Relations to
Their Fellows...

193
By Richard Barry
What's the Matter with the Eastern
Farmer? The Agricultural Revolution 196

By J. Madison Gathany Pictures from Outlook Readers.... 200 The Book Table : The Story of Opal..

201 The New Books..

201 This Week's Outlook : A Weekly Outline Study of Current History..... 204

By J, Madison Gatbany By the Way.

204

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W. L. Douglas shoes are for sale by over 9000 shoe dealers besides ourown stores. If your local dealer cannot supply you, take no other make. Order direct from factory. Send

for booklet telling how to order shoes bymail,postagefree. CAUTION.-Insist upon having W.L.Doug

President las shoes. The name and price is plainly

W.L.Douglas Shoe Co., stamped on the sole. Be careful to see

167 Spark Street, that it has not been changed or mutilated.

Brockton, Mass.

We foreglos

A Cash Offer for Cartoons and Photographs

Cash payment, from $1 to $5, will promptly be made to our readers who send us a cartoon or photograph accepted by The Outlook.

We want to see the best cartoons published in your local papers, and the most interesting and newsy pictures you may own. Read carefully the coupons below for conditions governing payment. Then fill in the coupon, paste it on the back of the cartoon or print, and mail to us.

THE EDITORS OF THE OUTLOOK, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York

BY SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 A YEAR. Single copies

15 cents. For foreign subscription to countries in the Postal Union, $6.56.

Address all communications to

THE OUTLOOK COMPANY 381 Fourth Avenue

New York City

THE OUTLOOK. September 29, 1920. Volume 126, Number 5. Published weekly by The Outlook Company at 381 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Subscription price $5.00 a year.

To the Cartoon Editor of The Outlook :

The attached cartoon is clipped from the

of the following

To the Photograph Editor of The Outlook :

The attached photograplı is the property of the undersigner and is submitted for publication in The Outlook. Postage is enclosed for its return if unavailable. It is my understanding that The Outlook agrees to pay $3 for this photograph if reproduced as a halfpage cut, or smaller, and $5 if reproduced in larger size than a half page. The enclosed brief account of the object or event depicted you may use as you see fit.

date

If this particular clipping is selected for reproduction in The Outlook, I will accept One Dollar as paymenti in full for my service in bringing it to your attention. I agree that if it is not used it will not be returned nor its receipt acknowledged.

Name..

Name....

Address...

Address..

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CONTRIBUTORS'

GALLERY SOON OON after Frank A. Vanderlip, the banker, founded the famous Scar

borough School J.

MADISON GATHANY appointed head of the Department of History and American Citizenship. The author of " What's the Matter with

the Eastern Farmer ?” began his contact with the soil on a farm in the hills of Pennsylvania, where he was appropriately born in a log cabin. This contact he kept throughout his boyhood, as this bit of autobiography, which we have elicited from him, reveals :

After spending fourteen years on the old home farm, I was hired out to a farmer for $7 per month and my board. I had to get up at four o'clock in the morning, go fully a mile for the cows through the wet grass, and help milk them. After breakfast I went out into the fields and worked until seven o'clock in the evening. Frequently we went out to do a little extra work

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To Insure Christmas Delivery Monogrammed Handkerchiefs

Should be ordered now

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He went to Brown University, where he earned not only his way but his A.M. in English and History. HEODORE H. PRICE brings to bis

discussion of taxation a very necessary commodity for one who writes on this subject. He brings the good will of his readers, for he has earned it by his many articles in The Outlook. He brings also experience in finance, expe rience as an editor and writer (he is editor of " Commerce and Finance"), and the open-mindedness that enables à man to change his opinion in the presence of new evidence. In connection with his article we have a story to tell that may interest our readers. Mr. Price mentions in his article a cartoon. We were interested in it and wanted to find it to show it to our readers, so Mr. Moore, the Art Manager of The Outlook, turned to his friend Mr. Foss, of the Brooklyn Library, who promptly discovered the cartoon as reproduced in the columns of the “Literary Digesti", We had not access to the old age of the New York “ World,” in which it orig. inally appeared. We therefore applied to the “Digest," and were accorded the courtesy of access to the “Digest's file, from which the cartoon as it appears in The Outlook was re-reproduced. R

ICHARD BARRY contrasted the char

acters of Cox and Harding as news paper men in his article last week. The article this week is a mate to that one. In obtaining his information at first hand Mr. Barry visited both Dayton and Marion, meeting and talking not only with the candidates themselves. but with their friends and neighbors.

Send for Fall and Winter Catalogue No. 35

mailed free on request.

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