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would be found peculiarly useful, it is well known that many of our nobility and gentlemen are in the habit of rearing great numbers of pheasants annually, by means of the common domestic hen, from eggs laid by tame pheasants, in aviaries arranged for the purpose, and it frequently happens that where the number of pheasants is large, more egys are laid than hens can be procured to cover.

This apparatus is the invention of Monsieur Lemare of Paris, and has been introduced to this country by Mr. Appleyard, of No. 9, Montague-Street, Russel Square, where it may be seen by any of our readers who take an interest in the subject.

A Correspondent from Oundle writes :-“ Although the weather is severe enough for anything, we have had very little wild fowl up as yet. We have had a fair sprinkling of snipes about the springs and osiers. The Aoods have been higher this last autumn than I remember for many years, and we may expect another as soon as the frost

At one time, about the middle of December, an unusual quantity of woodcocks were found in

A party in the forest klled eleven couples and a half in one day (a very rare occurrence in our woods.) I was told by one of the beaters that they must have seen nearly fifty couple. Nothing at all rare has been shot in our neighbourhood this winter. I have not observed so many of the wintry migratory birds as usual.

We have had a very

fair show of game, taking the aggregate of our manors, but in some places it lias been very thin. More hares than I remember for years I think. We have a fair sprinkle of birds left sor breeding, and if we can preserve the game through the snow, and the breeding season should turn our favourable we need not despair.

breaks up

our covers.

REVIEW OF NEW PUBLICATIONS. The FLY-Fisher's EntOMOLOGY : with coloured representations of

the Natural and Artificial Insect, and Observations on Trout and Grayling Fishing. By Alfred Ronalds. Second edition. Longman and Co. This is a new edition of Mr. Ronalds' book on fly-fishing and flymaking, to which we have already given our meed of praise in the number of the N. S. M. for September, 1836. The favour with which it was received at its first publication, the concurrent testimony of its worth by the generality of anglers, and above all, by that prince of the rod, Christopher North, added to the still more pleasing fact of the first edition being cleared off the bookseller's shelf, is the reason of the Fly-fisher's Eutomology coming a second time before us. We cannot imagine a better.

The most novel and useful feature of the volume is that it offers us, upon the same leaf, representations (faithfully coloured) of the living and artificial flies; so that the angler need not corfine himself to the imitation of an imitation, but has the natural figure to work up to ; a very important point in all productions of art. Another distinguishing feature of the book before us is the original remarks on the nature and habits of fishes, as ascertained by personal observation on the banks of the Blythe, where Mr. Ronalds built a fishing hut, and passed many days in watching the practices of the trout and grayling of the stream, and in trying experiments on their senses of hearing, sight, &c. The originality and usefulness of those remarks cannot be too highly estimated. The best proof that they have been so to a considerable extent is the call for a second edition of the book : that their value may be still further extended, we soon hope to see testified by the appearance of edition No. 3. The Farmer's EncYCLOPEDIA, AND DICTIONARY OF RURAL AF

By Cuthbert W. Johnson, Esq. Longman and Co. Part V. This standard work pursues its career of usefulness, and realises the promise of its first numbers, in proving a most valuable acquisition to our“ practical literature."

FAIRS.

FINE ARTS.

CHANGING Horses, and All Right. Engraved by J, Harris, from

Pictures by C. Henderson. Fores, Piccadilly.

These are two most characteristic pictures of what our sons will know very little about from their own experience, if things progress in the same way, and as rapidly, in the next twenty years as they have done in the last ten. “Changing horses," indeed! It is a change they never dreamt of, to drag omnibuses with thirteen inside, and as many as you please out, AND NO MORE to feed the monster Rail. · These two plates are perfect in their style, and will prove an ornament to the sporting boudoirs of our readers.

Last Quar. 2 day 10 hour 26 min, morn,
New Moon 10 day 11 hour 54 min. morn.
First Quar. 18 day 11 hour 41 min. morn.
Full Moon 25 day 4 hour 15 min. morn.

Sun

High Water
rises & D

Drises London Bridge
OCCURRENCES.

sets.

A and sets. morn. altern.

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MW
D D

m.

m. h.

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Ib.
b.

m.b.
1 TU NEWMARK. C. M, ABYRYST Sr.C 17 27 21 morn. 5 49 6

6 2 w S. LANC. (Chats) C. M. ABYRs. 54 35 22 1 15 6 27 6 51 3ITH

(STEEPLE-CHASE. 17 23 23 2 34 7 15 7 40 4 F Fair on the Thames, 1814 34 38/24 3 44 8 13 8 53 5 s WINSTONE C. M.

r7 20 25 4 45 9 3710 22 6 s Shrobe Sunday.

54 42 26 5 34 11 711 49 7 M Shrove Monday

117 17 27 6 11

0 23 8 Tu Shrove Tues. ASIDown C. M. 54 45128 6 400 51 1 14 9 w Ash Wednesday

177 13 29 7 0 1 35 1 55 10 Tu MorPC.M. FleeTWC.M. Lan'kS54 49 N sets. 2 14 2 32 11 F OsterLEY C.M. [& RENF. C.M.17 9 16 a 29 2 48 3 3 12 s Newton Fair

s4 53 2 7 37 3 19 3 31 13 s First Sunday in Lent.

17 6 3 8 46 344 3 57 14 M St. Valentine's Day

s4 56 4 9 56 4 121 4 25 15 Tu Burton-on-HUMB.C.M. Sr. Al-r7 2 511 9 4 411 4 55 16 W S. Lanc. C.M. (Ban's St.Ch.s5 06 morn.

5 10 5 24 17 TH WORCESTER STEEP. Chase 1r6 58 7 0 24 5 42 6 1 18 F

s5 4 8 1 39 6 25 6 50 19 s

1r6 55 9 2 52 7 15 7 43 20 S Second Sunday in Lent.

s5 710 3 57 8 239 6 21 M Tarleton C. M.

16 5111! 4 49 9 54 10 40 22 Tu Altcar C. M.

s5 11 12 5 29 11 24

rh 47 13 5 58 0 2 0 35 24TH Morreth C.M. LYTHAM C.M.35 15 14 6 22 1 7 1 34 25 F Oundle Fair | Belfast Sr. Ch.16 43 F rises. 1 581 2 19 26 S Eclipse died, 1789

s5 1916 7 a 58 2 41 3 1 27 S Third Sunday in Lent.

r6 39 17 9 26 3 23 3 42 28 M Chesterfield Fair.

1s5 23 18 10 52 4 2 4 24 COURSING MEETINGS IN FEBRUARY Newmarket

Mr Watson

2, 3, 4, & 5 South Lancasbire (Chatsworth).

.Mr M George..

2&s Winstone

..Mr M George Ashdown Park..

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Mr Kimber.... 8, 9, 10, & 11 Morpeth (Linden)

Mr Nightingale..

10 & 11 Fleetwood Champion

..Mr M.George

10 & 11 Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire.

. Mr Dunlop..

10 & 12 Osterley Club (Osterley)..

11 & 12 Barton-upon-Humber

15, 16, & 18 South Lancasbire (Broughton Yorksbire) Mr Nightingale.

. 16 & 17 Tarleton

Mr M.George. Altcar (Lord Sefton’s)..

Mr M.George.

22 & 23 Manchester, &c. (Lytham)

Mr M.George..

24 & 25 Morpeth (Tallyho)

. Mr Nigbatingale...

24 Closing Of STAKES IN FEBRUARY.-Bath and Bristol, Chester, Croxton Park, Feb, 1 ; Coventry, Feb. 14; Croxton Park, Feb. 20.

..21

Last Quar. 4 day 1 hour 22 min. morn.
New Moon 12 day 6 hour 29 min. moin.
First Quar. 19 day 10 hour 42 min. aft,
Full Moon 26 day 1 hour 57 min. aft.

Sun

High Water
OCCURRENCES.

rises & ) rises London Bridge
sets.
A & sets.

morn. / aftern.

M
D

m.

m.b.

b.
h.

m. h. m. I TU WATERLOO C. M.

r6 35 19 morn.

4 42 5 0 2W Livp. Gr. Sreep. Ch. Spel.C.M.55 27 20 0 14 5 19 5 40 3 TH HANPTON SPR.M. Pemb.Steep.C 16 31 21 1 311 6 11 6 25 4 F Wem. Fair

s5 30 22 2 371 6 47 7 12 5 S MORPETH C, M.

r6 28 23 3 321 7 43 8 21 6 S Fourth Sunday in Lent

s5 34 24 4 12 9 7 9 52 7 M North UMBERLAND C. M. 116 24 25 4 4310 3411 14 8. TU OXFORD Steep. Ch. [C. M. s5 38 26 5 611 50 9 w Covent.R Gt. Driffield S.C. Lyth.r6 20 27 5 23 O 24 O 52 10 Tu RUGBY St. C. ARDROSSAN C.M. s5 4228 5 38) 1 12 1 32 11 F HORNCASTIE STEEP. CHace 1r6 16 29 5 53 1 481 2 5 12 s Südbury Fair

s5 47 N sets 2 21 2 36 13 s Fifth Sunday in Lent.

Ir6 11 17 a 46 2 49 3 3 14 M WORCESTER Steep. Ch.

s5 51 2 8 59 3 14 3 31 15 TU FINCULEY STEEP. Ch. [C.M.r6 71 310 13 3 44 4 0 16 W WARW.S.M. FLEETWOOD CHAMP. s5 55 411 27 4 14 4 32 17 T: R. LEAM.S.C. HURWORTEH.S.C.16

3 5 morn.

4 49 5 6 18 F Cam. Term ends

Is5 59 6 0 41 5 25 5 45 19 s Ox. Term ends

r5 59 7 1 48 6 7 6 32 19 $ Palm Sunday.

s6 3 8 2 43 6 591 7 30 21 M Derby Fair

r5 55 93 26 8 11 8 59 22 Tu

s6 710 3 58 9 4810 34 23 W Cottisfond R.

r5 51111 4 2211 1611 52 24TH Boston STEEP. C.

Is6 11 12 4 43

0 22 25 F Lady Day-Good Friday 15 47 13 5 1 0 47 1 13 126 S Easter Eve.

s6 15 F rises. 1 34 1 55 27 $ Easter Sunday.

r5 43 15 8 a 19 2 17 2 40 28 M E. Sussex H. R.

s6 1916 9 45 2 59 3 19 29 Tu CANTERBURY S. R. Epsom Sp. R.'r5 39 17 11 7 3 39 4 1 30W Abergav.R.Cat.BR.R.Nor.s Cs6 23 18 morn. 4 21 4 42 31 TH CROXTON Park R.

15 35 19 0 20 5 0 5 20

RACES IN MARCH. Hampton Spring 3 | Cottisford ... 23 | Canterbury Sprg.29 Catterick Bridge .30 Coventry...... East Sussex Hunt28 Epsom Spring..30 | Croxton Park, ..31 Warwick Spring.16 | Pytchley Hunt...29 | Abergavenny ...30

STEEPLE CHASES IN MARCH. 2. Liverpool (2 ch.&a b.r.) | 17. Hurworth Hunt. | 10. Carrick-on-Suir 3. Pembrokesbire. 24. Boston

14. Castleconnell 8. Oxford RI.Pr.ofW.Hcp 30. Northampton,

16. Kildare Hunt [lingar) 9. Great Driffield.

Bottesdale, Suffolk(mid. 16 & 17. Westmeath (Mul10. Rugby (two.)

dle of the montb) 17. Drogheda 11. Horncastle.

Cheltenham Annual 17. Rathcroghan (co.Rosc.) 11. Worcester (two)

IRISH STEEPLE Chases. 28. Wexford 15. Finchley (two)

1. Castlepollard (co. Wsti. ( 29. Limerick 17. Royal Leamington. 8 and 9. Castlebellingham, 30. Haggardstown(co.Lth)

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