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νη δ' άρα πάντες καρχήσι’ έχον,

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-κΑΙ "Ελειβον, αρά

σαντο δε πάντες 'Εσλα τα γαμβρώ. Which, when regularly arranged, evidently forms part of two Sapphic stanzas.

But our Editor has been negligent here as well as elsewhere ; and the whole clause, from « Nobis," down to « decurrunt," seems to have been written purposely to introduce the flashing emendation by means of the Æolic digamma; which Brunck knew was necessary here, as well as either our Editor, or Terentianus Maurus. Much better would his time have been employed, if he had turned over the leaves of more useful books than Terentianus Maurus, from which he might have extracted what would have been beneficial to the “ Scriptores Sapphicorum carminum."

Had he favored us with a scale of the metre, showing what syllables are admissible in different places, (the initial ditrochæus by the way, which in one fragment of Sappho occurs eight times within the space of seven stanzas, he never once mentions :) how the pauses should be varied, what forms are peculiar to Sappho, what may be introduced from other authors, under what restrictions the break and elision at the end of the third line should be used, and a few other necessary points, we might have thanked him for the little exertion requisite, and have excused his Latinity, had it not been quite so elegant, so

inops rerum,” provided a certain proportion of beneficial instruction had been blended with it.

At present we have nothing more to say on the subject, except that traces of similar imperfection and inaccuracy may be found in tolerable abundance throughout the whole of the Preface; some of which have been discussed by a learned Reviewer, (Quarterly Review, Art. vii.) We shall content ourselves with wishing, that in case our Editor should have to superintend the publishing of the remaining compositions, as he seems to intimate in p. ii. of his Preface; “ Diu multùmque

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nobis cogitantibus tandem visum est non omnia simul in lucem edere, sed potiùs carminum fasciculum, quem si placidâ fronte exceperit juventus nostra studiosa, reliqua etiam, et, præclara quidem ea, aliquando edi fortè possint ;he will either give us a correct and complete account of what he purposes to serve up as a dessert to the young imitators of Sappho (“quæ Sapphicorum, ut aiunt, carminum scriptoribus fructui sint,” Pref. p. iv.) or will at all events favor us with a total silence.

Such is our creed on the subject, and as such we give it to the public : if, however, the reasons which we have adduced, and the grounds which we have gone upon, should appear censurable, either to the Editor, or to any other person, we shall be very happy to receive any objections to our opinion through the medium of the Journal; when we shall be pleased to admit or applaud them in the same proportion that they are decisive or specious.

M. D.

July 18. 1811.

GREEK INSCRIPTION.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE CLASSICAL JOURNAL.

SIR,

Shall be happy in supplying occasionally the pages of your Journal with some Inscriptions, chiefly Greek, copied by me in Asia Minor and Greece, in the years 1806 and 1807, and which have never yet been printed. I shall subjoin a few explanatory remarks.

ROBERT WALPOLI.

Tilbuster Lodge, Godstone,

Surry, July 30.

NO. 1.

Greek Inscription, in a Turkish Cemetery, close to Guzel

Hissar, the antient Tralles.

Τ ΗΙΓΛΥΚΥΤΑΤΗ ΙΠ Α Τ Ρ ΙΔΙ
Μ ΑΡ.ΑΥΡΑ ΝΑΡ Ε Α Σ ΣΥΝ
Τ Η ΙΓYNAIKI ΚΛ. Θ Ε ΟΔΩΡ
A KAIT OI Σ ΙΙΑΙ ΣΙΝ
ΙΟΥΛ Ι Α Ν Ω Ι Α Ν Δ Ρ Ε Α
Θ Ε Ο Δ Ω Ρ Ω Τ Ο Υ Σ
Ε Π Ι Χ Ρ Υ Σ Ο Υ Σ Ε Ρ Ω
Τ Α Σ Ι Η Κ Α ΙΤ Α Σ Β
Ν Ε Ι Κ Α Σ Σ Υ Ν Τ ΑΙΣ
Β Α Σ Ε Σ Ι Ν Ε Κ Τ Ω Ν
ΙΔΙΩ ΝΑ Ν Ε Θ Η Κ Ε Ν.

« M. Aurelius Andreas, with his wife Theodora, and his

children Julianus, Andreas, Theodorus, has consecrated to his beloved country, at his own expence, the 18 golden

Loves, and 2 Victories, with their bases." I have supplied the first and last letters of the first line, as they are erased from the marble, which now stands, as a tomb stone, in the Cemetery, as you approach Guzel-Hissar from the East. Dr. Chandler thought this place was the antient Magnesia ad Mæandrum : this is not true; it was Tralles.

The basė, as well as what was placed on it, is frequently mentioned in Inscriptions ; thus in Gruter MXviii. 3. « Genium cum basi marmoreâ.” In Gudius, Inscrip. Ant. vi. 5. “ signum æreum cum basi marmoreâ." Dorville has observed, that the

. base and foundation of the building are mentioned sometimes ; as in Vignolius, cum basi et hypobasi ; and in the Marm. Campano, we read, cum basi et epistyl :

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To the Rev. Mr. Maurice, Author of the Indian Antiquities, on

Pagan Trinities, including Remarks on Passages of Pausanias, on Appian, and on the 43d C. of Tacitus's Germany,

LETTER II.

PART I.

Sir,

Since I wrote my last Letter to you, I have met with the following passage in Pausanias (B. 2. c. 22.)': “Beyond the tomb [of Pelasgus] is a small structure of brass, which supports the images of Diana, of Jupiter, and of Minerva, a work of some antiquity : Lyceas has in some verses recorded the fact that this (trinity] is the representation of Jupiter. Machinator.” This passage, which establishes the fact that the Grecians worshipped a trinity in unity, fully justifies the translation, which I gave in my first Letter, of another passage in this valuable antiquary.

Pausanias says in B. 1. c. 28., when he is describing the Areopagite district of Athens : “ Here are the images of Pluto, of Mercury, and of Tellus, to whom all such persons, whether citizens or strangers, as have vindicated their innocence in the Court of Areopagus, are required to sacrifice.” Again, in B. 1. c. 2.3 “ In a temple of Ceres, at the entrance of Athens, there are images of the Goddess herself, of her daughter, and of Bacchus, with a torch in his hand.” Here you see the same doctrine of a trinity in unity: it was the temple of Ceres, but a trinity in unity was worshipped there : thus, in the passage above, the structure, which is there said

1 πέραν δε του τάφου χαλκειόν έστιν ου μέγα, ανέχει δε αυτό αγάλματα αρχαία, 'Αρτέμιδος, και Διός, και 'Αθηνάς Λυκίας δε ούν εποίησε Μηχανέως το άγαλμα είναι Διός, και Αργείων έφη τους επί "Ιλιον στρατεύσαντας, ενταύθα ομόσαι παραμένειν πολεμούντας, έστ' άν ή το "Ιλιον έλωσιν, ή μαχομένους τελευτή σφάς επιλάβη. κ. τ. λ.

* Κείται δε και Πλούτων, και Ερμής, και Γης άγαλμα ενταύθα θύουσι μεν όσοις εν Αρείω Πάγω την αιτίαν εξεγένετο απολύσασθαι· θύουσι τε και άλλως ξένοι τε ομοίως και αστοί.

3 Πλησίον ναός έστι Δήμητρος• αγάλματα δε αυτή τε, και η παίς, και δ"δα έχων "laxxos.

how

2

to have supported three images, is called the image of Jupiter Machinator : thus the temple at Rome, which was consecrated to the joint worship of Jupiter, of Juno, and of Minerva, was called the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. Perhaps, Sir, you may suppose that this trinity, which consisted of Ceres, of Proserpine, and of Bacchus, was an accidental assemblage: these three divine personages, ever, often represented the Grecian trinity: thus Pausanias groups them together in B. 2. c. xi.': these were the three deities, who were worshipped in the Eleusinian mysteries, as the following passage from Pausanias? (B. 8. c. 25.) will prove: “The river Lado then continues its course to the temple of the Eleusinian Ceres, which is situated in the territories of the Thelpusians: the three statues in it are each seven feet high, and all of marble; they represent Ceres, Proserpine, and Bacchus." I shall submit to your consideration, in the present Letter, two other passages of Pausanias (whose work forms a complete summary of the Grecian religion, and should, therefore, be the constant study of all those scholars, who undertake to illustrate this important subject), and shall reserve some other passages for a future Letter. Pausanias says in B. 2. c. 2. that “ by a temple dedicated to all the Gods, there were placed three statues of Jupiter in the open air, of which one had no title, a second was styled the terrestrial, and the third was styled the highest.Here you see another representation of the trinity: Pausanias says that one of these images had no title ; what the title should have been, will immediately occur to you, if you consider that the other titles were the God of the Heaven, and the God of the Earth : the title should have been [Oandcrues] the God of the Sea. The subsequent passage of Pausanias from B. 2. c. 24. will con

3

' 'Εν αριστερά της όδου---Πυραία καλούμενον έστιν άλσος, ιερον δε εν αυτώ Προστασίας Δήμητρος και Κόρης» ενταύθα εφ' εαυτών οι άνδρες εορτήν άγουσι τον δέ νυμφώνα καλούμενον, ταϊς γυναιξίν εορτάζειν παρείχασι και αγάλματα Διονύσου, και Δήμητρος, και Κόρης, τα πρόσωπα εν τω νυμφώνι εστίν.

2 Επί Δήμητρος Γερον κάτεισιν 'Ελευσινιάς το. δε ιερον τούτο έστι μεν Θέλπουσίων εν όροις· αγάλματα δε εν αυτώ, ποδών επτά ουκ αποδεών έκαστον, Δήμητρος έστι τε η παίς, και ο Διόνυσος τα πάντα ομοίως λίθου.

3 Τα δε του Διός και ταύτα όντα εν υπαίθρω, το μεν επίκλησιν ουκ είχε, τον δε αυτών χθόνιος, και τον τρίτον καλούσιν “ΥΨΙΣΤΟΣ.

4 'Ενταύθα δε αναθήματα κείνται και άλλα, και Ζεύς ξόανον, δύο μέν ή πεφύκαμεν έχoν οφθαλμούς, τρίτον δε επί του μετώπου τούτου το Δίο Πριάμω φασίν

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