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TO A LADY.*

So thou 'dst have me always sighing;

See mine eyes for ever wet; Hear me always talk of dying:

GOING TO HEAVEN: THIS HOUSE TO LET.

By my faith, no; I 'm too old now,

Far too old now, so to joke; To the stripling bard I leave it,

In the elegy to croak.

Let the stripling bard who pleases,

Hang with clouds his brightest day, Chaunt his Night Thoughts to the moonlight,

In the haunted forest stray.

Off, ye ghosts! off to your churchyards ! !

Devils blue, I hate ye all:
Spent, my day; I 'll spend my evening

At gay Humour's fancy ball;

* who had written to me that she admired my verses to the Griese (see page 188) written nearly fifty years ago, more than many of my later poems, and asked: “Why dost thou not always give play to thy natural feelings? why indulge in cold satire ?"

There with Satire I 'll quadrille it,

Waltz it there with Epigram,
While the bagpipe and the fiddle

Strike up lively: LIFE 's A SHAM.

Not till after toll of midnight,

Talk to me of rest or sleep;
Once to bed, let no one wake me

Out of slumber sweet as deep. [STRUVESTRASSE, DRESDEN, Febr. 11, 1866.)

SOLDIER AND VIVANDIERA.

“Alternis dicetis, amant alterna Camenae."

SOLDIER.

To sweeten one half of the year,

VIVANDIERA.

Coll' arte e coll' inganno

SOLDIER.
You ’ve but to cheat and drink small beer;

VIVANDIERA.

Si vive' mezzo l' anno;

SOLDIER.
To make the other half as sweet,

VIVANDIERA.
Coll'inganno e coll' arte

SOLDIER.
You've but to drink small beer and cheat.

VIVANDIERA.

Si vive l'altra parte. [STRUVESTRASSE, DRESDEN, Jan. 3, 1866.]

COWPER'S ROSE.

"THE
HE rose had been washed, just washed in a shower

Which Mary to Anna conveyed;"
So Mary and Anna, no less than the flower,

Got a washing which stood them in stead.

And had I been the poet, I had taken my share

Of a washing could do no one harm; Then, to dry the whole four, made a turn in the air,

With a beautiful maid on each arm,

And a red blushing rose in my coat button-hole,

All the four so fresh, shining and gay, There is no one who met us wouldn't say in his soul,

“What a washing they ’ve all got today!" (STRUVESTRASSE, DRESDEN, April 16, 1866.]

WHO keeps a lapdog need seek no excuse;
Its very use is that it is no use.
It 's superfluity that makes genteel;

We cock a feather on buff coat and steel. (CHRISTIANSTRASSE, DRESDEN, Nov. 19, 1865.)

HYPHEN AND HYMEN.

HYPHEN and HYMEN! wizards skilled to couple
Two blessed singles into one curst double.
Hymened one wizard's own self, hy and PHEN,

Hyphened the other wizard, hy and MEN. [STRUVESTRASSE, DRESDEN, April 30, 1866.)

Sub persona: - Mrs. Jane Hopkins, inviting the author to drink

tea with her on her eighty-fifth birthday, Jan. 5, 1844.

Ir it' please God I am alive
Next Friday, I 'll be eighty-five;
Come then, I pray, dear James, and spend
That evening with your poor old friend,
Who, with more joy, another year
Will enter on, if you are here.
Tea and hot cake we 'll have at seven;
You 'll sing or dance until eleven;
And I will sit and hear your song,
Or see you trip the floor along
To the piano's liveliest measure,
Till eye and ear drink-in such pleasure
That I forget my age's pain,
And my old heart grows young again.
Then, when you 've sung and danced your fill,
To the pie we 'll fall, with right good will,

The Christmas pie of well spiced meat,
For bishop or lord mayor, a treat.
The pie discussed, we 'll wash it down
With glass on glass of Stanley's brown
Sherry, or port or calcavella,
Till youth grows warm and age grows mellow,
And then we 'll part, ere peep of light

So don't forget next Friday night. (FITZWILLIAM - SQUARE, DUBLIN, Jan. 2, 1844.)

TO THEIR EXCELLENCIES,

THE LORDS JUSTICES.

My Lords Justices of Ireland, listen to me, rich James Lennox

William Naper; Though you seem to know your business well, there 's no harm

in giving you a flapper; It 's neither to amuse myself nor you, I write this present

letter, * But just by way of practice, and the next, it will be better.

I sat, as you know, on a Commission with his Grace, the

Archbishop of Dublin, Hatching out the reason why the Irish tenantry keep the country

such a trouble in,

* For Mr. Naper's letter to the Lords Justices of Ireland, recommend. ing the building of the Irish workhouses, see Saunders' News - letter, Nov. 7. 1840.

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