A Guide to Lancaster and the Neighbourhood

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C. Barwick, 1843 - 84 strán (strany)
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Strana 1 - There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet; Oh! the last rays of feeling and life must depart, Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart. Yet it was not that nature had shed o'er the scene Her purest of crystal and brightest of green; 'twas not her soft magic of streamlet or hill, Oh! no — it was something more exquisite still. Twas that friends, the beloved of my bosom, were near, Who made every dear scene of enchantment more...
Strana 1 - Twas that friends, the beloved of my bosom, were near, Who made every dear scene of enchantment more dear, And who felt how the best charms of nature improve, When we see them reflected from looks that we love. Sweet vale of Avoca ! how calm could I rest In thy bosom of shade with the friends I love best, Where the storms that we feel in this cold world should cease, And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace ! ST SENANUS AND THE LADY.
Strana 8 - Ulverston and Lancaster Sands, is seen at the feet of an amphitheatre formed by nearly all the mountains of the Lakes ; an exhibition of alpine grandeur, both in form and colouring, which, with the extent of water below, composeg £ scenery perhaps faintly rivalling that of the Lake of Geneva. To the south and west the Irish channel finishes the view...
Strana 17 - ... rivalled in stately splendour and stirring events. To detail more minutely the Lancastrian edifice's historic and architectural greatness, we recur, with satisfaction, to a very able description, published at Lancaster by Mr. Barwick, and here acknowledge the assistance it affords us. " Lancaster Castle occupies, with the church, a commanding position on a hill to the west of the town. The Roman Castrum was commenced on the site of the present castle, the outline of the camp being an ellipsis,...
Strana 37 - Overlooking the Lune and its green slopes, the eye ranges to the bay of the sea beyond, and to the Cumberland and Lancashire mountains. On an island near the extremity of the peninsula of Furness, the double point of Peel Castle stands up from the sea, but is so distant that it resembles a forked rock. This peninsula, which separates the bay of Ulverstone from the Irish channel, swells gradually into a pointed mountain called Black Combe, thirty miles from Lancaster, the first in the amphitheatre...
Strana 6 - Lune serpentizes for many a mile, and comes forth ample and clear, through a well-wooded and richly pastured foreground. Every feature which constitutes a perfect landscape of the extensive sort, is here not only boldly marked, but also in its best position.
Strana 24 - I was put into a tower, where the smoke of the other prisoners came up so thick that it stood as dew upon the walls, and sometimes it was so thick that I could hardly see the candle when it burned ; and I being locked under three locks, the...
Strana 1 - As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet ; Oh ! the last rays of feeling and life must depart, Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart. Yet it was not that Nature had shed o'er the scene Her purest of crystal and brightest of green ; 'Twas not her soft magic of streamlet or hill, Oh ! no,—it was something more exquisite still.
Strana 18 - Wery wall might be seen in many places less than a hundred years ago, together with the ditch outside of it. This wall, when described by Stukely, ran west of the castle and church, towards Bridge-lane, pointing directly on the river. At Bridge-lane it made an angle, and ran along the brow of the hill, to Church-street. " The Gateway tower, though of less vast proportions than the Norman keep, is the most picturesque part of the building. It was built by John o'Gaunt, whose statue occupies a niche...
Strana 65 - Lancaster in the 1 830s was climbing out of the recession left by the demise of its eighteenth-century trade that does not mean it -was partaking in the massive industrialisation of most other towns in the county. Edward Baines observed in 1836: The parish of Lancaster, though inferior in wealth and population to several of the southern parishes, is superior to them all in the dignity of its ancient family, and in the station it holds as the capital of the county. From a variety of causes this place...

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