The history of civilisation in Scotland, Zväzok 3

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W.P. Nimmo, 1884

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Renewal of the quarrel the Covenanting army cross the Tweed
75
Westminster Assembly of Divines The Westminster Confession
83
CHAPTER XXV
93
Cromwells government of Scotland The state of the nation
101
The state and feeling of the Scotch nobles The Committee
109
The second session of parliament the bishops resumed their seats
116
Meeting of diocesan synods Three hundred ministers ejected from
119
Treatment of the pri
126
Conventicles still increasing description of these meetings Severe
132
Continuance of the persecution the bond and other oppressive
138
Proceedings of the government a reward offered for the apprehen
147
An indemnity offered Two parties of Presbyterians The perse
150
Declarations of the Societymen or Whigs A series of sanguinary
156
Failure of Argyles attempt against the government his execution
165
Meeting of the Presbyterians address to the Prince of Orange
173
An opposition party formed 178180
178
Battle of Killiecrankie The position of the King and the means
184
State of the Highlands Means employed for the pacification
190
The King refused to receive an address from the Darien Company
203
The number of Union Commissioners equal on both sides
210
Mode of electing the Representatives from Scotland to the first par
212
More addresses against the Union The articles touching commerce
216
CHAPTER XXVIII
220
Measures of the government to secure the peace of the Highlands
226
CHAPTER XXIX
238
Modes of treating the Highlanders The social state of the High
247
The poor and vagrant classes numerous in Scotland The man
254
Efforts to introduce improvements in the manufacture of cloth
322
Introduction of glassmaking Progress of glassmaking in
329
Introduction of Tobacco and tobacco spinning Price of tobacco
333
The coinage The use of a mill in minting the coins introduced
339
There was a marked and rapidly growing interest in trading
345
Conclusion of the chapter 351
351
Satirical rhymes and lampoons by the opposing parties in the Cove
357
Satirical rhymes ballads and pasquils relating to the government
364
After the Battle of Culloden the Jacobite songs rose to a higher
370
Baillie character of his writings his Letters and Journals Boyd
376
Dr Forbes Bishop Forbes Leighton Burnet description
382
Legal Literature Sir Thomas Hope Stair Sir George Mackenzie 388389
388
State of Medical Science Incoporation of the Royal College
392
Monopoly of teaching certain branches conferred on the Grammar
399
The course of instruction and subjects taught in the Grammar
410
After the Revolution the Universities were purged 416417
416
His reconstruction of the Universe
422
Principles and method of Descartes philosophy His peculiar views
430
His psychology mind a thinking substance Relation of the mind
439
The affections and the emotions of the mind desire and appetite
454
Leibnitz wrote on many subjects His form of philosophising
463
Motion the prime idea in Hobbes philosophy His psychology
470
Miltons political writings His defence of the Commonwealth
479
Origin of ideas simple and complex ideas abstract ideas no clear
487
Language as the medium of expressing thought The degrees
493
Clarkes moral theory 501502
501
Shipping of Scotland in the Seventeenth Century PAGE 505508
505

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Populárne pasáže

Strana 480 - Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas: How comes it to be furnished ? Whence comes it by that vast store, which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety ? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge ? To this I answer, in one word, From experience. In that all our knowledge is founded, and from that it ultimately derives itself.
Strana 481 - Our observation, employed either about external sensible objects, or about the internal operations of our minds, perceived and reflected on by ourselves, is that which supplies our understandings with all the materials of thinking. These two are the fountains of knowledge, from whence all the ideas we have or can naturally have, do spring.
Strana 95 - Is it therefore infallibly agreeable to the Word of God, all that you say? I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ, think it possible you may be mistaken.
Strana 466 - THAT when a thing lies still, unless somewhat else stir it, it will lie still for ever, is a truth that no man doubts of. But that when a thing is in motion, it will eternally be in motion, unless somewhat else stay it, though the reason be the same, namely, that nothing can change itself, is not so easily assented to. For men measure, not only other men, but all other things, by themselves...
Strana 493 - For whoever thinks there is a God, and pretends formally to believe that he is just and good, must suppose that there is independently such a thing as justice and injustice, truth and falsehood, right and wrong, according to which he pronounces that God is just, righteous, and true.
Strana 466 - For after the object is removed, or the eye shut, we still retain an image of the thing seen, though more obscure than when we see it. And this is it, the Latins call imagination, from the image made in seeing; and apply the same, though improperly, to all the other senses. But the Greeks call it fancy; which signifies appearance, and is as proper to one sense, as to another. IMAGINATION therefore is nothing but decaying sense; and is found in men, and many other living creatures, as well sleeping,...
Strana 504 - A spirit is one simple, undivided, active being: as it perceives ideas, it is called the understanding, and as it produces or otherwise operates about them, it is called the will.
Strana 465 - The original of them all, is that which we call SENSE, for there is no conception in a man's mind, which hath not at first, totally or by parts, been begotten upon the organs of sense.
Strana 467 - This decaying sense, when we would express the thing itself (I mean fancy itself) we call Imagination, as I said before : but when we Would express the decay, and signify that the sense is fading, old and past, it is called Memory.
Strana 484 - The idea then we have, to which we give the general name substance, being nothing but the supposed, but unknown, support of those qualities we find existing, which we imagine cannot subsist sine re substante, without something to support them, we call that support substantia; which, according to the true import of the word, is, in plain English, standing under or upholding.

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