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WITH NOTES, CHIRONOLOGICAL TABLES, ARGUMENTS, &c.

BY

THE REV. LEWIS EVANS, M.A.,

LATE FELLOW OF WADHAM COLLEGE, OXFORD.

TO WIIOIT IS ADDED TIIE

METRICAL VERSION OF JUVENAL AND PERSIUS,

DY TIE LATE

WILLIAM GIFFORD, ESQ.

NEW YORK:
HARPER & BROTIERS, PUBLISHERS

FRANKLIN BQUARE.

1886.

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CASAR.

CICEP.O'S TUSCULAN DISPUTAVIRGIL.

TIONS, THE NATURE OF THE
SALLUST

GODS, AND THE COMMON
HOR: C'S.

WEALTH.
TERENCE.

JUVENAL.
TACITUS. 2 Vols.

XENOPHON. LIVY. 2 Vols.

HOMER'S ILIAD. CICERO'S ORATIONS.

HOMER'S ODYSSEY
CICERO'S OFFICES, LÆLIUS,

HERODOTUS.
CATO MAJOR, PARADOXES,

DEMOSTHENES. 2 Vola.
SCIPIO'S DREAM, LETTER

THUCYDIDES.
TO QUINTUS.

ÆSCHYLUS.
CICERO

ON
ORATORY AND

SOPHOCLES.

EURIPIDES. 9 Vok
PLATO (SELECT DIALOGUES).

OP AZORS.

12mo, Cloth, $100 per Volume.

I send either of the above works by mail, postage prepaid, to ach nited States of Canada, on receipt of the price

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While the poetical versions of Juvenal deservedly hold a very high place in the literature of this country, it is a curious fact that there exists no single prose translation which can stand the test of even ordinary criticism. Whether it be that the temptation to a metrical version of a poetical writer is too great with some, or whether the labor of faithfully representing the genius of confessedly the most difficult writer in the Latin language has deterred others, the fact is undeniable, that there is no prose version from which the unclassical reader can form any adequate idea of the writings of the greatest of Satirists.

Madan, though faithful, is utterly unintelligible to any one who has not the Latin before him. Sheridan is far too free, in every sense of the word, to be either a fair expositor of his original, or to suit the taste of the present day; and without any disparagement of the labors of Sterling, Nuttall, Smart, or Wallace, it was found impossible to adopt any one of them even as the basis of a version which should be worthy of a place in the present series.

The accompanying translation, therefore, is entirely original; and the translator is not aware of having copied a single line from any previous version. How far he has succeeded in giving a faithful transcript of the author, and in, at the same time, infusing some spark of the fire and spirit of the original, must be for others to determine; all that he dares venture to assert is, that he has brought to the task an enthusiastic admiration of his author, and a careful study of many years. The same remarks apply to the translation of Persius.

The notes are to a considerable extent original, and the English, perhaps even the classical, reader may not be displeased at the occasional introduction of passages from metrical versions in which the sense appeared to be the most forcibly given.

A Chronological Table has been added, which the labors of Mr. Clinton have enabled the Translator to present in a far more correct form than heretofore.

The poetical version by Gifford has been annexed, as having the

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