William Cowper: Religion, Satire, Society

Predný obal
Bucknell University Press, 2004 - 207 strán (strany)
Following a brief introduction showing the current state of Cowper scholarship, this book first examines eighteenth-century critical theory, showing how theology and literary analysis frequently overlapped. The next chapters examine Cowper's formative relationship with the satirical culture of the early 1760s, continuing with an explanation of how Cowper was drawn into public satirical debate as a result of his cousin's lengthy and controversial defense of polygamy. Cowper's reputation as a satirist is then juxtaposed with his understanding of gardening as an endeavor rich in political and theological metaphors. The final chapters consider Cowper's fascination with frontiers and with marsh maritime imagery, imagery that represents the defining limits of his imagination. The book concludes by asserting that Cowper's contradictions, inhibitions, and honest insecurities render his body of work peculiarly relevant to a twenty-first-century readership. Conrad Brunstrom is Lecturer in English at the National University of Ireland Maynooth.
 

Čo hovoria ostatní - Napísať recenziu

Na obvyklých miestach sme nenašli žiadne recenzie.

Obsah

Introduction
11
Light and Darkness in MidEighteenthCentury Poetry and Criticism
21
The AntiVisionaries of the Nonsense Club The Liberating Effects of Literary Digression
43
Antithelyphthora and the Moral Satires The Enduring Appeal of Common Sense
69
A Gardeners Question Time Topographic Traumas and Impious Politics
99
William Cowpers Satanic Terror A Topographic Poetics of Maritime Extremity
138
Conclusion
167
Notes
176
Select Bibliography
194
Index
203
Autorské práva

Iné vydania - Zobraziť všetky

Časté výrazy a frázy

Populárne pasáže

Strana 13 - My best desires are faint and few, I fain would strive for more ; But when I cry, " My strength renew !

Bibliografické informácie