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Τ R Α Ν S L Α Τ Ι Ο Ν

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AT MR. LEWIS's, No 157, SWALLOW-STPELI;

NEAR PICCADILLY,

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ECIMUS Junius Juvenal was born at Aqui

num, a town of the Volsci, a people of Latium: bence, from the place of his birth, he was called Aqui

It is not certain whether he was the son, or foster-child, of a rich freedman. He had a learned education, and, in the time of Claudius Nero, pleaded causes with great reputation. About his middle

age be applied himself to the study of Poetry; and, as he saw a daily increase of vice and folly, he addieted him- Self to writing Satire : but, having said something (Sat. vii. 1. 88–92.) which was deemed a refle£tion on Paris the aftor, a minion of Domitian's, he was banished into Ægypt, at * eighty years of age, under pretence of sending him as captain of a company of Soldiers. This was looked upon as a sort of humorous punishment for what he had said, in making Paris the bestower of posts in the army.

However, Domitian dying very soon after, Juvenal returned to Rome, and is said to have lived there to

• Quanquam Octogenarius.-MARSHALL, in Vit. Juv. VOL. I.

the

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the times * of Nerva and 'Trajan. At last, worne out with old age, he expired in a fit of coughing.

He was a man of excellent morals, of an elegant taste and judgment, a fast friend to Virtue, and an irreconcileable enemy to Vicè in every shape.

As a writer, his style is unrivalled, in point of elegance and beauty, by any Satirist that we are acquainted with, Horace not excepted. The plainness of his expresions are derived from the honesty and integrity of his own mind : his great aim was—" to bold, as it were, the mirror up to nature; to few so Virtue her own feature, Scorn her own image, and " the very age and body of the time his form and

pressure f."-He meant not, therefore, to corrupt the mind, by openly describing the lewd practices of his countrymen, but to remove every veil, even of language itself, which could soften the features, or hide the full deformity of vice from the observation of his readers, and thus to strike the mind with due abborrence of what he censures. All this is done in so mofterly a way, as to render him well worthy Scaliger's encomium, when he styles him-Omnium Satyricorum facilè Princeps. He was much loved and respected by I Martial. Quintilian speaks of him, Inft. Orat. Lib. x. as the chief of Satirijts. || Ammianus

* Ibique ad Nervæ & Trojani tempora supervixiffe dicitur. MARSHALL. Ib. + Hamlet, A&t iii. Scepe 2.

I See Mart. Lib. vii. Epig. 24. || Hift. Lib. xxviii.

Marcellinus

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