History of Civilization in England, Zväzok 1

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John W. Parker, 1864

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Government attempted to remedy this ignorance by calling
98
Nothing can weaken superstition but knowledge
106
The influence of foreigners in Spain was displayed in the expul
108
But it was of no avail because politicians can do nothing when
115
And has possessed great patriots and great legislators
116
For the reasons already stated their efforts were fruitless not
135
The Spaniards have moreover long been celebrated for honour
145
CHAPTER II
157
But are very similar in regard to superstition
169
Black therefore did immense service by giving free scope to
179
They were too feeble and insignificant to elect their own magis
185
The injury which these invasions inflicted upon Scotland stopped
197
The Crown in its efforts against the nobles was encouraged
206
The nobles revenged themselves by becoming Reformers 212213
212
For industry was impossible and the commonest arts were
214
As the nobles took the opposite side and as the people had no
216
In 1546 Cardinal Beaton was assassinated and Knox began
223
In 1559 the queen regent was deposed the nobles became
229
Thereupon the Protestant preachers said that the nobles were
236
The first manifestation of this rebellious spirit was the attack
242
In 1582 James VI was imprisoned and his captivity was jus
249
Their leader Melville personally insulted the king and they were
256
Violent language used by the clergy against the king and against
264
His cruel treatment of them 267269
267
These three causes influenced the policy of Ferdinand and Isabella 1819
274
The Scotch before they would crown Charles II compelled
280
Hutchesons philosophy
288
In 1688 another reaction in which the Scotch again freed them
293
Reasons which induced the Highlanders to rebel in favour of
300
They moreover declared that harmless and even praiseworthy
383
To prevent such imaginary sins the clergy made arbitrary regu
393
Loyalty became united with superstition and each strengthened
398
Hence the national character was mutilated For the pleasures
399
In no Protestant country have the clergy pushed these narrow
405
This is well worthy of notice because the inductive method being
411
Hence the secular philosophy of the eighteenth century though
418
sophy 579583
427
That conclusion was entirely speculative and unsupported by
432
His Theory of Moral Sentiments and his Wealth of Nations
437
His Natural History of Religion
469
Reids philosophy
477
But this sort of progress depending too much upon individuals
483
Opposition between the method of Reid and that of Bacon 485486
485
His method was deductive and does not come under any of
496
He derived great aid from poetry
510
The action of fire and water on the crust of the earth may
519
Sir James Hall afterwards took the matter up and empirically
524
Nature of the evidence of the supposed difference between
532
VOL II
542
The progress of England on the other hand depends upon
546
His natural disposition was towards deduction
554
Hunters inquiries concerning the movements of animals and
560
As a physiologist he was equalled or excelled by Aristotle
566
But his English contemporaries being eminently inductive so dis
573
Notwithstanding this difference the deductive method was
579
Theology forms the only exception to this rule 583584
583
The notions countenanced there respecting the origin of epidemics
590

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Strana 42 - This land of such dear souls, this dear, dear land, Dear for her reputation through the world, Is now leas'd out, I die pronouncing it, Like to a tenement, or pelting farm...
Strana 42 - This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England, This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings, Fear'd by their breed, and famous by their birth, Renowned for their deeds as far from home, (For Christian service, and true chivalry,) As is the sepulchre in stubborn Jewry, Of the world's ransom, blessed Mary's son...
Strana 447 - The uniform, constant, and uninterrupted effort of every man to better his condition, the principle from which public and national, as well as private opulence is originally derived, is frequently powerful enough to maintain the natural progress of things toward improvement, in spite both of the extravagance of government, and of the greatest errors of administration.
Strana 448 - ... led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it.
Strana 464 - Upon the whole, I have always considered him, both in his lifetime and since his death, as approaching as nearly to the idea of a perfectly wise and virtuous man as perhaps the nature of human frailty will permit.
Strana 462 - In opposition to this narrow and malignant opinion, I will venture to assert, that the increase of riches and commerce in any one nation, instead of hurting, commonly promotes the riches and commerce of all its neighbours...
Strana 449 - The late resolution of the quakers in Pennsylvania to set at liberty all their negro slaves, may satisfy us that their number cannot be very great. Had they made any considerable part of their property, such a resolution could never have been agreed to.
Strana 592 - The Maker of the universe established certain laws of nature for the planet in which we live ; and the weal or woe of mankind depends upon the observance or neglect of those laws.
Strana 469 - Here, then, is the only expedient from which we can hope for success in our philosophical researches : to leave the tedious, lingering method, which we have hitherto followed ; and, instead of taking, now and then, a castle or village on the frontier, to march up directly to the capital or centre of these sciences, to human nature itself, which being once masters of, we may everywhere else hope for an easy victory.
Strana 438 - Were it possible that a human creature could grow up to manhood in some solitary place, without any communication with his own species, he could no more think of his own character, of the propriety or demerit of his own sentiments and conduct, of the beauty or deformity of his own mind, than of the beauty or deformity of his own face.

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