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PHOTOGRAPH BY SOMERS

MISS EMILIE WATTS McVEA
THE NEW PRESIDENT OF SWEET BRIAR COLLEGE, VIRGINIA

AND ITS NEW PRESIDENT this important educational institution

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JOHN J. DILLON, COMMISSIONER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND

MARKETS OF NEW YORK Mr Dillon's endeavors to settle the controversy between milk producers and distributers in New York, with due regard to the interests of the farmer and the consumer as well as of the great companies, have

attracted Nation-wide attention. See editorial comment

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A GREAT EXHIBITION OF PRIZE CATTLE This train of prize Jersey cattle contains 168 bulls and cows, the show herds of ten prominent exhibitors at the National Dairy Congress Show at Waterloo, Iowa. They are being transported to the National Dairy Show at Springfield, Massachusetts. The train will make three stops-at Indianapolis, Columbus, Ohio, and Utica, New York-for exhibition purposes. The cattle on the train are, it is estimated, worth $250,000

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A DRINKING FOUNTAIN OF THE Y. M. C. A. AT LAREDO, TEXAS

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SOLDIERS WRITING IN A TEMPORARY TENT OF THE Y. M. C. A. AT

LEON SPRINGS, TEXAS

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FATHER HARVEY, OF THE ORDER OF THE HOLY CROSS OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH, TALKING WITH A SOLDIER IN THE ARMY Y. M. C. A. AT LAREDO, TEXAS WORK OF THE ARMY AND NAVY DEPARTMENT OF THE

Y. M. C. A. ON THE MEXICAN BORDER

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THE LORD BISHOP OF WORCESTER, ENGLAND, ON A VISIT TO AMERICA The Rt. Rev. Huyshe Wolcott Yeatman-Biggs, Lord Bishop of Worcester, whose portrait appears above, comes to this country as one of two bishops to represent the Church of England at the General Conven

tion of the Protestant Episcopal Church at St. Louis. See editorial comment

THE NANTUCKET SUBMARINE WARFARE

371

Herald” argues that international law per- likely to have any real effect in interfering mits submarines to visit American ports to with commerce. take on sufficient provisions for their home- Newspapers are pointing out that, if a ward voyage “and to reduce the number of submarine campaign could not be waged hostile merchantmen both on their in and out successfully in the North Sea, it certainly voyages.” It adds: “We confidently hope could not be waged four thousand miles from that in the future it will make exceedingly home. It is noted with relief that in the effective use of this right.”

submarine operations so far reported there Among second-generation German-Amer- is evidence of an attempt to comply with the icans admiration for the audacity of the feat requirements of international law. and its success is modified by apprehension The possibilities of a blockade are hardly of unpleasant consequences for this country. seriously considered, for the Middle West is They dislike having the war brought to our so far from the ocean that it is not so keenly doors; they resent the seeming blockade of sensitive as the coast to the war on the sea. American commerce. They fear that some Undoubtedly, if the submarine operations mistake or rashness may revive the whole should begin to affect the price of wheat the. submarine controversy in aggravated form. country's granary would be less placid. It

THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL. is recognized that there is “dynamite” in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin,

situation, yet there is no evidence of grave October 10, 1916.

apprehension. Admiration for the brilliancy of Germany's

It is not to be inferred that the Middle exploit in operating armed submarines so far West is not interested. The novel developfrom home, rather than resentment over a

ment of submarine warfare is everywhere possible blockade of the American coast or the topic of conversation. But as yet there apprehension of breaking off diplomatic rela- is no indication in the comment of Chicago, tions, is the prevailing note in Middle West- St. Louis, Kansas City, Topeka, Lincoln, or ern comment in the two days immediately

Des Moines newspapers of any tense anxiety. following the U-boat raids. The incident is

Kansas City, Missouri,

H. J. HASKELL. considered as a spectacular affair that is not October 10, 1916.

O

?"

THE NANTUCKET SUBMARINE WARFARE

A POLL OF THE INTERNATIONAL PRESS N Oc ber 8, within a radius of thirty In dire straits on land, ooks like a despairmiles of the Nantucket lightship, un- ing attempt on the part of Germany to do

armed merchant vessels were sent to something, goodness knows what." So dethe bottom by one or more German subma- clares the New York “Telegram.” rines. When Americans recovered from the These two quotations may be taken from shock of this news, they began to inquire, the many expressions of disgust and resent" What will the Hughes papers have to say ment of the papers supporting Mr. Hughes and “ What will the Wilson papers reply ?” in the present campaign. But they are not or “ What will the German-American press satisfied with this. Some of them see say?" and " What shall we hear from the dangerous possibilities, as for instance the foreign press ?"

Syracuse “ Post-Standard,” which says :
THE HUGHES PAPERS

If by mistake the commander should attack a “A submarine sinking liners at our harbor

liner or a freighter whose right to traverse our

waters without molestation is undisputed, there mouths is very much like a thug who should

would be an end to the patience of the Amerstand at a store door with a bludgeon to

ican people. attack all citizens who did their trading there." So remarks the Rochester “ Post- Many Hughes papers also point out that Express.” It adds : “Somehow it seems a we are, in some degree at least, responsible little bit too personal in its invidiousness for the event. As to the judicial branch towards us."

of the Government, the Newark “News" “ It is a mad act, an act of desperation. affirms that such destruction as the German

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