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that were most precious to me.—Did heaven look on,
and would not take their part? Sinful Macduff,
they were all struck for thee! naught that I am,
not for thine own demerits, but for mine,

fell slaughter on their souls: heaven rest them now! Val. Be this the whetstone of your sword : let grief

convert to anger ; blunt not the heart, enrage it. Macd. O, I could play the woman with mine eyes,

and braggart with my tongue !-But, gentle heavens,
cut short all intermission ; front to front
bring thou this fiend of Scotland and myself;
within my sword's length set him; if he scape,

heaven forgive him too! Mal,

This tune goes manly.
Come, go we to the king; our power is ready;
our lack is nothing but our leave: Macbeth
is ripe for shaking, and the powers above
put on their instruments. Receive what cheer you

may ;
the night is long that never finds the day.

W. SHAKESPEARE

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YOUNG Lochinvar is come out of the west, through all the wide border his steed was the

best; and save his good broad-sword he weapon had none, he rode all unarmed, and he rode all alone. So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war, there never was knight like the young Lochinvar. He staid not for brake, and he stopped not for stone, he swam the Eske river where ford there was none; but ere he alighted at Netherby gate, the bride had consented, the gallant came late: for a laggard in love, and a dastard in war, was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar. So boldly he entered the Netherby Hall among bride's-men and kinsmen and brothers and all; then spoke the bride's father, his hand on his sword, (for the poor craven bridegroom said never a word,) 'O come ye in peace here, or come ye in war, or to dance at our bridal, young lord Lochinvar?'

'I long wooed your daughter, my suit you denied ;love swells like the Solway, but ebbs like its tideand now I am come, with this lost love of mine, to lead but one measure, drink one cup of wine. There are maidens in Scotland more lovely by far, that would gladly be bride to the young Lochinvar.' The bride kissed the goblet; the knight took it up, he quaffed off the wine, and he threw down the cup; she looked down to blush, and she looked up to sigh, with a smile on her lips, and a tear in her eye. He took her soft hand, ere her mother could bar,'Now tread we a measure!' said young Lochinvar. So stately his form, and so lovely her face, that never a hall such a galliard did grace; while her mother did fret, and her father did fume, and the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and

plume; and the bride-maidens whispered, “'Twere better by far to have matched our fair cousin with young Loch

invar. One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear, when they reached the halldoor, and the charger

stood near; so light to the croupe the fair lady he swung, so light to the saddle before her he sprung! ‘She is won! we are gone, over bank, bush and

scaur ; they'll have fleet steeds that follow,' quoth young

Lochinvar.

SIR W. SCOTT

PASSAGES FOR TRANSLATION

INTO GREEK TRAGIC ANAPÆSTIC VERSE

H

1113

HAPPINESS
E who would happy live to-day

must laugh the present ills away,

nor think of woes to come; for come they will or soon or late; since mixed at best is man's estate

by Heaven's eternal doom.

W. HASTINGS

1114 What though we shroud in savage den

from day's all-piercing eye?
Yet have we joys, as other men:

our watchful fears,

our perils, cares,
we sweeten still with liberty.

WHO

1115

KNOWLEDGE
HO loves not knowledge? who shall rail

against her beauty? may she mix

with men and prosper! who shall fix
her pillars? Let her work prevail.
But on her forehead sits a fire:

she sets her forward countenance

and leaps into the future chance, submitting all things to desire.

A. TENNYSON

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1116

THE BRITONS SONG OF TRIUMPH

COME

‘OME, if you dare, our trumpets sound;
come,

if

you dare, the foes rebound: we come, we come, we come, we come, says the double, double, double beat of the thundering drum.

Now they charge on amain,

now they rally again;
the gods from above the mad labour behold,
and pity mankind, that will perish for gold.

J. DRYDEN

SEE

1117

SONG IN ALBION AND ALBANIUS
EE the god of seas attend thee,

nymphs divine, a beauteous train;
all the calmer gales befriend thee
in thy passage o'er the main :
every maid her locks is binding,
every Triton's horn is winding,
welcome to the watery plain.

J. DRYDEN

1118

MATERNAL LOVE

H! little doth the young one dream

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what power is in his wildest scream

eard by his mother unawares !
He knows it not, he cannot guess;
years to a mother bring distress;
but do not make her love the less.

W. WORDSWORTH 1119

WAR
WAR, if thou wert subject but to death,

and by desert might'st fall to Phlegethon,
the torment that Ixion suffereth,

or his whose soul the vulture seizeth on,
were all too little to reward thy wrath;

nor all the plagues that fiery Pluto hath
the most outrageous sinners laid upon.

T. KYD

O

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DESIR

ESIRE that is of things ungot

see what travaile it procureth, and how much the minde endureth, to gaine what yet it gaineth not:

for never was it paide

the charge defraide
According to the price of thought.

S. DANIEL

II21

PLEASURE
OH righteous doom, that they who make
ordering the whole life for its sake,

miss that whereto they tend :
while they who bid stern duty lead,

content to follow, they,
of duty only taking heed,
find pleasure by the way.

R. C. TRENCH

2E ;

I 122

barns and garners never empty ;
vines with clustering bunches growing;
plants, with goodly burden bowing ;
spring come to you, at the farthest,
in the very end of harvest !
scarcity and want shall shun you ;
Ceres' blessing so is on you.

W. SHAKESPEARE

H

1123

THE ENTRANCE OF NILUS
ERE comes the agéd river now,

with garlands of great pearl his brow
begirt and rounded. In his flow
all things take life and all things grow:
a thousand wealthy treasures still,
to do him service at his will,
follow his rising flood, and pour
perpetual blessings in our store.
Now the plants and flowers shall spring

and the merry ploughman sing. F. S.

III

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