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under the broad green oaks, where never again

shall I wander, tossing the ball with my maidens, or wreathing the

altar in garlands, careless, with dances and songs, till the glens rang

loud to our laughter? Too full of death the great earth is already: the

halls full of weepers ; quarried by tombs all cliffs; and the bones gleam

white on the sea-floor, numberless, gnawn by the herds who attend on the

pitiless sea-gods, even as mine will be soon: and yet noble it seems

to me, dying, giving my life for a people, to save to the arms of

their lovers maidens and youths for awhile: thee, fairest of all, shall I slay thee?

C. KINGSLEY

1227

SIR BEDIVERE
AH
H! my Lord Arthur, whither shall I go ?

Where shall I hide my forehead and my eyes?
For now I see the true old times are dead,
when every morning brought a noble chance,
and every chance brought out a noble Knight.
Such timès have not been since the light that led
the holy elders with the gift of myrrh.
But now the whole Round Table is dissolved,
which was an image of the mighty world;
and I, the last, go forth companionless,
and the days darken round me, and the years,
among new men, strange faces, other minds.

A. TENNYSON

1228

CHRIST ON THE MOUNTAIN

Twas a mountain at whose verdant feet

IT wide,

lay pleasant: from his side two rivers flowed,
the one winding, the other straight,' and left between
fair champain with less rivers interveined,
then meeting joined their tribute to the sea;
fertile of corn the glebe, of oil and wine;

with herds the pastures thronged, with flocks the

hills ; huge cities and high-towered, that well might seem the seats of mightiest monarchs; and so large the prospect was, that here and there was room

for barren desert, fountainless and dry.
1229 He looked, and saw what numbers numberless

the city gates outpoured, light-armed troops,
in coats of mail and military pride;
in mail their horses clad, yet fleet and strong,
prancing their riders bore, the flower and choice
of many provinces from bound to bound.
He saw them in their forms of battle ranged,
how quick they wheeled, and flying behind them shot
sharp sleet of arrowy showers against the face
of their pursuers, and overcame by flight;
the field all iron cast a gleaming brown.

J. MILTON

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So the Eagle

that bears the thunder of our grandsire Jove, with joy beholds his hardy youthful offspring forsake the nest, to try his tender pinions in the wide untracked air: till, bolder grown, now, like a whirlwind, on a shepherd's fold he darts precipitate and gripes the prey; or fixing on some dragon's scaly hide, eager of combat and his future feast, bears him aloft reluctant and in vain wreathing his spiry tail.

J. ROWE

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YETE

ET once more, O ye laurels, and once more

ye myrtles brown, with ivy never-sere,
I come to pluck your berries harsh and crude;
and with forced fingers rude
shatter your leaves before the mellowing year:
bitter constraint, and sad occasion dear,
compels me to disturb your season due;
for Lycidas is dead, dead ere his prime,

young Lycidas, and hath not left his peer.
Who would not sing for Lycidas? He knew
himself to sing, and build the lofty rime.
He must not float upon his watery bier
unwept, and welter to the parching wind,

without the meed of some melodious tear. 1232 For we were nursed upon the self-same hill,

fed the same flock by fountain, shade and rill;
together both, ere the high lawns appeared
under the opening eyelids of the morn,
we drove a-field, and both together heard
what time the gray-fly winds her sultry horn,
battening our flocks with the fresh dews of night,
oft till the star that rose at evening, bright,
toward heaven's descent had sloped his westering wheel.
Meanwhile the rural ditties were not mute,
tempered to the oaten Aute;
rough Satyrs danced, and Fauns with cloven heel
from the glad sound would not be absent long,

and old Damætas loved to hear our song. 1233 But O the heavy change, now thou art gone,

now thou art gone, and never must return!
Thee, Shepherd, thee the woods and desert caves
with wild thyme and the gadding vine o'ergrown,
and all their echoes mourn:
the willows, and the hazel-copses green,
shall now no more be seen
fanning their joyous leaves to thy soft lays.
As killing as the canker to the rose,
or taint-worm to the weanling herds that graze,
or frost to flowers, that their gay wardrobe wear,
when first the white-thorn blows;

such, Lycidas, thy loss to shepherds' ear. 1234 Where were ye, Nymphs, when the remorseless deep

closed o'er the head of your loved Lycidas?
for neither were ye playing on the steep,
where your old bards, the famous Druids, lie,
nor on the shaggy top of Mona high,
nor yet where Deva spreads her wizard stream.
Ay me, I fondly dream!
had ye been there...for what could that have done?
what could the Muse herself that Orpheus bore,
the Muse herself for her enchanting son,
whom universal Nature did lament,

when, by the rout that made the hideous roar,
his gory visage down the stream was sent,

down the swift Hebrus to the Lesbian shore? 1235 Weep no more, woful Shepherds, weep no more,

for Lycidas your sorrow is not dead,
sunk though he be beneath the watery floor.
So sinks the day-star in the ocean bed,
and yet anon repairs his drooping head,
and tricks his beams, and with new-spangled ore
flames in the forehead of the morning sky:
so Lycidas sunk slow, but mounted high,
through the dear might of Him that walked the waves,
where, other groves and other streams along,
with nectar pure his oozy locks he laves,
and hears the unexpressive nuptial song,
in the blest kingdoms 'meek of joy and love.
There entertain him all the saints above,
in solemn troops, and sweet societies,
that sing, and singing in their glory move,
and wipe the tears for ever from their eyes.
Now, Lycidas, the shepherds weep no more;
henceforth thou art the Genius of the shore,
in thy large recompence, and shalt be good
to all that wander in that perilous food.

J. MILTON

1236

ADAM'S VISION FROM THE MOUNT

N other part the sceptred heralds call

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gray-headed men and grave, with warriors mix'd
assemble, and harangues are heard; but soon,
in factious opposition; till at last
of middle-age one rising, eminent
in wise deport, spake much of right and wrong,
of justice, of religion, truth and peace,
and judgment from above. Him old and young
exploded, and had seized with violent hands,
had not a cloud descending snatched him thence,
unseen amid the throng. So violence
proceeded, and oppression, and sword-law,
through all the plain, and refuge none was found.

J. MILTON

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LA

AST of this route the savage Phonos went,

whom his dire mother nurst with human blood : and when more age and strength more fierceness

lent,
she taught him in a darke and desart wood
with force and guile poor passengers to slay,

and on their flesh his barking stomach stay,
and with their wretched blood his fiery thirst allay.

Ten thousand furies on his steps awaited,
some sear'd his harden'd soul with Stygian brand:
some with black terrors his faint conscience baited,
that wide he stard, and starched hair did stand ;
the firstborn man still in his mind he bore,

foully array'd in guiltlesse brother's gore,
which for revenge to heaven from earth did loudly

roar.

P. FLETCHER

1238

THE SUPPER OF BASIL
OVER the joyous feast the sudden darkness de-
All was silent without, and illuming the landscape

with silver
fair rose the dewy moon and the myriad stars; but

within doors brighter than these shone the faces of friends in the

glimmering lamplight. Then from his station aloft, at the head of the table,

the herdsman poured forth his heart and his wine together in end

less profusion: thus he spake to his guests, who listened, and smiled

as they listened : 'Welcome once more, my friends, who so long have

been friendless and homeless, welcome once more to a home, that is better per

chance than the old one ! Here no hungry winter congeals our blood like the

rivers;

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