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the palm of admiration from me? No, no, my dear girl, youth and beauty are spring flowers, and, as my

admirer says,

“ Il n'y a qu un tems pour vivre

Amis, passons le gaiement ;" and I am determined so to do: nay, more, it shall not be my fault if I do not make a convert of you, and if I do not prevail upon you to quit the frigid zone, where you are frozen up under a non-intercourse with the votaries of pleasure, and visit fashion's most favourite haunts; to wit, la bonne ville de Paris. But now let me treat you with an account of our last ball. I prevailed upon Mamma to give an impromptu two nights ago : our dear countess ordered the music, the decorations, the supper, &c. and I assure you all was magnifique, although Mamma grumbled at the expense, and was out of her element all the night. You would nave been astounded to see the incense which was offered to what was called my charms; to have beheld so many gay flatterers about me; such rivalry for the advantage of dancing with me; such high request as I was in amongst the elegantes. I had written a list of promises made to aspiring partners as long as my arm, and I was not able to fulfil one half of my engagements. The disappoiuted many claim my hand for another ball next week, at the duke de —'s ambigu, a party without form or ceremony, at the duke's hotel, which is given weekly. The voice of scandal breathes a vile report respecting that house, namely, that the lady who does the honours is the duke's chere amie, that the birth of her daughter is doubtful, and that — hotel is a scene of intrigue and a match-making place. Mademoiselle, it is added, is to go off in wedlock to the best bidder, the heaviest purse being the object in view. Eh bien ! What is that to me, or to any one else but the party concerned ? But to return to our soirée : I was dressed in a robe à la vierge of white taffetas, richly trimmed with expensive lace, my hair all in simple ringlets, kept back by a costly comb, which, by the way, is not paid for yet; white satin shoes completed my artless appearance, for which I was idolized by a legion of lovers. Every one with some two or three orders dangling from their button-holes. Dear, delightful creatures ! how well they do understand the art of flattery. I did not dance with one Englishman the whole of the night, for which I gained much praise from the Paris beaux. The fact is, that an Englishman in Paris is a mighty insipid being; he looks like a fish out of water, and a queer fish too. The French militaires eclipse them completely, and place them in darkness visible. I had a pretty scolding from Mamma the next morning for what she terms levity; but, on the other hand, I was les delices of the French for my sprightliness and amiability; and I was assured that I might be mistaken for a French elegante du premier ton; that is just what I aim at; and I trust that if ever I return to Scotland I shall not be recognizable. But far from me be the horrid thought of quitting dear France; I could pass my life in this admirable metropolis ; and, between you and I, I should have no objection to becoming the partner for life of some young colonel, with the title of count or baron tacked to his name. How the Scotch lasses would envy me! A propos, I have had one offer, but of this hereafter, One thing my intended must the palm of admiration from me ? No, no, my dear girl, youth and beauty are spring flowers, and, as my

admirer says,

“ Il n'y a qu un tems pour vivre

Amis, passons le gaiement;" and I am determined so to do: nay, more, it shall not be my fault if I do not make a convert of you,

and if I do not prevail upon you to quit the frigid zone,

where you are frozen up under a non-intercourse with the votaries of pleasure, and visit fashion's most favourite haunts; to wit, la bonne ville de Paris. But now let me treat you with an account of our last ball. I prevailed upon Mamma to give an impromptu two nights ago : our dear countess ordered the music, the decorations, the supper, &c. and I assure you all was magnifique, although Mamma grumbled at the expense, and was out of her element all the night. You would nave been astounded to see the incense which was offered to what was called my charms; to have beheld so many gay flatterers about me; such rivalry for the advantage of dancing with me; such high request as I was in amongst the elegantes. I had written a list of promises made to aspiring partners as long as my arm, and I was not able to fulfil one half of my engagements. The disappoiuted many claim my hand for another ball next week, at the duke de —'s ambigu, a party without form or ceremony, at the duke's hotel, which is given weekly. The voice of scandal breathes a vile report respecting that house, namely, that the lady who does the honours is the duke's chere amie, that the birth of her daughter is doubtful, and that hotel is a scene of intrigue and a match-making place. Mademoiselle, my admirer will, doubtless, find me bien interressante as I am. What a pity it is that the fatigues of pleasure should disfigure the bloom of youth! But n'importe, I hear my admirer taking up my guitar, and playing a romance, I must away; once more farewell—My dear girl, believe me, with all my lightheadedness, as you are pleased to call it, still

Your unalterable friend,

FLIRTILLA. P.S. I send you the Almanac des Modes. We have here an almanack for every thing: one for the Muses, one for gluttons, &c. &c. &c. so that one runs after a new fashion, and another after a new dish or a new sauce. You will, perhaps, say that I am saucy enough without. « Comme vous le voulez, ma bonne amie.”

Encore, adieu.

Impossibility of forming an obscure Conception of a primary Cause until it be perfectly discovered.

Obscure Ideas have no existence.

WHEN I first reflected on the difficulty of explaining how the same sensation should be at once pleasant and painful, I consulted several works on the subject before I discovered that Hume devoted one of his Essays to the resolution of this curious phenomenon. Du Bos, Lord Kaimes, Dr. Johnson, Dr. Blair, Knight, Lessing, Schlegel, Fontenelle, and almost all the wri. ters who have attempted to explain it, may be more properrly considered critics than philosophers; or, if this distinction should appear obscure, as criticism and philosophy sometimes glide into each other, they were better qualified to distinguish between impressions, and to point out the “ rainbow hues" which connect them together, than to trace these impressions, and their voluble, impalpable connectives to their original source. The common observer perceives effects and impressions in the gross, but cannot ascertain their momentum, or the precise point to which they do, and beyond which they cannot, extend. This is the business of the critic: his duty is to point out where propriety ends, and where absurdity begins; and, therefore, the true critic never outsteps the modesty of nature. But the philosopher, not satisfied with marking the proper boundaries that distinguish impressions, and their immediate causes from each other, seeks to trace each of them distinctly to its primary source.

As the resolution of the present problem belongs to philosophy, and not to criticism, I was not much surprised to find tỉie writers whom I have now mentioned, in their attempts to trace the pleasures resulting from Tragic Representation to its original cause, not only contradicting each other, but contradicting those first truths or principles of reasoning, which are admitted by themselves, and by all mankind. He who contradicts first truths, however, will frequently be found to contradict himself, because he is continually admitting these truths where they serve to support his collateral or incidental arguments. That this has been the case with the writers who have treated on the present subject, will manifestly appear from the following pages,

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