The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Zväzok 159

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A. Constable, 1884
 

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Strana 67 - Doing this, and making the requisite addition, the formula finally stands thus :—Evolution is an integration of matter and concomitant dissipation of motion; during which the matter passes from an indefinite, incoherent homogeneity to a definite, coherent heterogeneity ; and during which the retained motion undergoes a parallel transformation.
Strana 227 - And forasmuch as nothing can be so plainly set forth, but doubts may arise in the use and practice of the same; to appease all such diversity (if any arise) and for the resolution of all doubts, concerning the manner how to understand, do and execute the things contained in this Book...
Strana 190 - In the course of the job I visited Salisbury, and whilst wandering there one mid-summer evening round the purlieus of the cathedral I conceived the story of The Warden — from whence came that series of novels of which Barchester, with its bishops, deans and archdeacons, was the central site.
Strana 199 - episodes in a novel. Every sentence, every word, through all those pages, should tend to the telling of the story. Such episodes distract the attention of the reader, and always do so disagreeably. Who has not felt this to be the case even with The Curious Impertinent and with the History of the Man of the Hill.
Strana 195 - All those I think who have lived as literary men - working daily as literary labourers - will agree with me that three hours a day will produce as much as a man ought to write. But then he should so have trained himself that he shall be able to work continuously during those three hours - so have tutored his mind that it shall not be necessary for him to sit nibbling his pen, and gazing at the wall before him till he shall have found the words with which he wants to express his ideas.
Strana 196 - A novel should give a picture of common life, enlivened by humour and sweetened by pathos. To make that picture worthy of attention, the canvas should be crowded with real portraits, not of individuals known to the world or to the author, but of created personages impregnated with traits of character which are known.
Strana 501 - ... as a piece of matter of measurable dimensions, with shape, motion, and laws of action, intelligible subjects of scientific investigation.
Strana 510 - Now that which can contrive, which can design, must be a person. These capacities constitute personality, for they imply consciousness and thought. They require that which can perceive an end or purpose ; as well as the power of providing means, and of directing them to their end*.
Strana 77 - How this metamorphosis takes place — how a force existing as motion, heat, or light, can become a mode of consciousness — how it is possible for aerial vibrations to generate the sensation we call sound, or for the forces liberated by chemical changes in the brain to give rise to emotion — these are mysteries which it is impossible to fathom. But they are not profounder mysteries than the transformations of the physical forces into each other.
Strana 510 - The acts of a mind prove the existence of a mind ; and in whatever a mind resides, is a person. The seat of intellect is a person.

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