Obrázky na stránke
PDF
ePub

Peruke.makers, Taylors, and Darc- Husband. - The Wanton Wife. ing-masters, '&c. Being the Sum of The Innocent Adultery. -COMEa Gentleman's Experience during his Dies; as they are now acting with

Tour through France and Italy. un verfal Applause. Honour, or the Fashionable Combat - The True Patriot, a Farce.

Hounslow Hea·h, or the Dernier Re- Handeli, Geminiani, Degiardini, Cha. fort.--The Suicide, or the Coup de brani, Pasqualini, Pasqualini, PaffeGrace. TRAGEDIES.

rini, Baumgarteni, Guadagni, Fral, The Virgin Unmalk'..--Miss in her Galli, item aliorum Harmoniotili.

Teens. -The Debauchees. She moruin Signororum et Signorarum
Would, if the Could.---The Careless OPERA.

T

No XXV. THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1754.

VIVIMUS AMBITIOSA

PAUPERT: Tt.

Jur.
A LAC'D, EMEROIDER'Q, POWDZR'D, BLOĠAR-CROWD;
HAUGHTY, YET EVEN POORER THAN THEY'RE PROUD.

A

Little Frenchman, commonly it sometimes appears as a Major. Of

known in town by the name of this sort of men are composed the nuCount, and whole figure has been long merous fraternity of the shabby-genteel, fuck up in the windows of print- shops, who are the chief support of the clothiers was always remarkable for thie mean. in Monmouth Street, and the barbers Nels, and at the same time the foppery in Middle Row. of his appearance. His hoes, though Women are naturally so fond of or. , perhaps capped at the toe, had red heeis nament, that it is no wonder we should to them; and his stockings, though meet with so many fecond-hand gentry often full of holes, were eonltantly roll. in that sex. Hence arile the red-armei ed up over his knees. By good luck Belles that appear in the Park every Sun. he was once master of half a guinea; and day; hence it is, that facks and peten. having a grcat longing for a feather to lairs may be seen at Moorfields and his hat, and a very presling necessity for Whitechapel; and that those wlio are a pair of breeches, he debated with him. ambitious to thine in diamonds, glirter felf about the disposal of his money. in paste and Scotch pebbles. When I However, his vanity got the better of see the wives and daughters of trader. his necessity; and the next time the Count men and mechanics make such attempts appeared in the Mall, by the ornaments at finery, I cannot help pilying their of his head, you would have imagined poor fathers and husbands; and at the him a Beau; and by the nether part of same time am apt to consider their dress his dress, you would have taken him for as a robbery on the shop. Thus, when a Heathen Philosopher.

I observe the tawdry gentility of a tal. The conduct of this Frenchman, how- low-chandler's daughter, I look upon ever ridiculous, is copied by a multitude her as hung round with long sixes, Thort of people in this town. To the same eights, and rush-lights; and when I little pride of defiring to appear finer - contemplate the aukward pride of dress than they can afford, are owing the in a butcher's wife, I suppose her carrymany ruity suits of black, the tyes that ing about her furloins of beef, fillets of feem taken from the basket of a shoeboy, veal, and shoulders of mutton. It was and the smart waistcoats edged with a vaftly diverted with a discovery I made narrow cord, which serves as an apo- a few days fince. Going upon some logy for lace. I know a man of this business to a tradesman's houle, I lurcait, who has but one coat; but by now prised in a very-extraordinary dishabille and then turning the cuffs, and change two females, whom I had been frequenting the cape, it passes for two. Heules ly used to see frangely dizened out in the same artifice with his peruke, which the Mall. The fine ladies, it seems, • is naturally a kind of Aowing Bob; but were no other than my honest friend's

by the occasional addition of two tails, daughters; and one, who always dresses

the family dinner, was genteelly em- of the gallery, as usual. Mem. To ployed in winding up the jack, while go to no more plays this year. the other was up to the elbows in foap. Invited Sir Charles Courtly and Major suds.

Standard to dinner.-Treated with A defire of grandeur and magnificence claret, and two courses, in order to is often absurd in those who can support appear handsome. Mem. To be deit; but when it takes hold of those who nied to every body before dinner-time can scarce furnith themselves with ne- for these next three weeks. cessaries, their poverty, instead of de- Sunday-My wife had a rout-Loit at manding our pity, becomes an object of whist thirty guineas-Card-money ridicule. Many families ainong those received, fifty shillings. N. B. My who are called middling people, are not

wife must be ill again. content without living elegantly as well Gave at church to a brief for a terrible as comfortably, and often involve them- fire, fix-pence.-Charity begins at felves in very comical distresses. When home. they aim at appearing grand in the eye of the world, they grow proportionably I should be sorry to have this method mean and fordid in private. ' I went the of balancing accounts become general. ether day to dine with an old friend; True æconomy does not merely consist and as he used to keep a remarkable in not exceeding our income, but in good table, I was surprised that I could such a judicious management of it, as scarce make a meal with him. After renders our whole appearance equal and dinner herung the bell, and ordered the consistent. We should laugh at a noblechariot to be got ready at fix; and then man, who, to support the expence of turning to me with an air of fuperiority, running horses, should abridge his set asked if he should set ine down. Here to a pair ; and, that his jockies might the riddle was out; and I found that his come in first for the plate, be content to equipage had eat up his table, and that have his family dragged to his countryhe was obliged to starve his family to seat, like fervant-maids, in the caravan. feed his horses.

There are many well-meaning people, I am acquainted at another house, who have the pride of living in a polite where the matter keeps an account against quarter of the town, though they are himself. This account is exactly stated distressed even to pay the taxes; and no. in a large ledger-hook. What he faves thing is more common than to see one from his ordinary expences he places particular room in an house furnished under the title of Debtor, and what like a palace, while the rest have scarce he runsout is ranged under CREDITOR. the neceffary accommodations of an inn. I had lately an opportunity of turning Such a conduct appears to me equally over this curious account, and could not ridiculous with that of the Frenchman, help smiling at many of the articles. who, (according to the jeft) for the Among the rest, I remember the fol- sake of wearing ruffles, is contented to lowing, with which I shall prefent the go without a thirt. reader.

This endeavour to appear grander

than our circumstances will allow, is no Dined abroad all this week-My wife where fo contemptible as among those ill-Saw no company-Saved seven

men of pleasure about town, who have dinners, &c.

not fortunes in any proportion to their Kept Lent, and saved in table-charges spirit. Men of quality have wifely conthe expence of four weeks.

trived, that their fins should be expenBated from the baker's bill half a crown. five: for which reason those, who wirta Saved in apparel, by my family conti- equal taste have lets money, are obliged

puing to wear mourning three months to be æconomists in their fins, and are longer than was requisite for the death put to many litzle shifts to appear toleof an aunt.

rably profligate and debauched. They Received 11. 105. of the undertaker, in get a knowledge of the names and faces lieu of a scarf, hátband, and gloves.

of the most noted women upon town,

and pretend an intimate acquaintance CREDITOR.

with them; though they know none of Went to the play with my wife and that order of ladies above the draggledaughters-Sat in the boxes, instead tailed profticuses who walk the Strand.

H

They

DEBTOR.

They talk very familiarly of the King's regulates her expences with the nicest Arms, and are in raptures with Mrs. economy, employs every morning in Allan's claret; though they always dine fetting down what is laid out upon her, snugly at a chop. house, and spend their and very seriously takes an account of evening at an ale-house or cyder-celiar. rolls and butter, two-pence--for ribThe most ridiculous charaéter I know band, one fhilling and four-penceof this fort, is a young fellow, the son pins, an halfpenny, &c. &c. Thus of a rich tobacconilt in the city, who does he reconcile his extravagance and (because it is the fashion) has taken a rugality to each other; and is as penugirl into keeping. He knows the world rious and exact as an ufurer, that he better than to let her up a chariot, or let may be as genteel and wicked as a lord. her have money at her own disposal. He

O

No XXVI. THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1754.

[blocks in formation]

A

Gentleman of my acquaintance The substantial tradesman is wheeled

lately laid before me an eltimate down to his fnug box; which has no. of the consumption of bread and cheese, thing rural about it except the ivy that cakes, ale, &c. in all the little towns over-runs the front, and is placed as near London every Sunday. It is in- near to the road-side as possible, where credible how many thousand buns are the pleasure of seeing carriages pass undevoured in that one day at Chelsea and der his window, amply compensates for Paddington, and how nuuch beer is his being almost sinothered with duit. swallowed at lington and Mile End. The few smart prentices, who are able Upon the whole, I was vaftly entertained to fit an horse, may be seen spurring with a review of this estimate; and could their broken-winded lacks op the hills: not help approving the obfervation of and the good-natured husband, together Tom Brown, that the Sabbath is a very with his mate, is dragged along the road • fine institution, since the very breaking to the envy and admiration of the foot . it is the support of half the villages pallenger, who (to compleat the Sun• about our metropolis."

day pieture) trudges patiently with a Our common people are very obser- child in one arm, while his beloved vant of that part of the commandment, doxy leans on the other, and waddles at which enjoins them to do no manner of his side sweltering beneath the unulual work on that day; and which they also weight of an hoop-petticoat. feem to understand as a licence to devote It is not to be supposed, that the it to plealure. They take this oppore country has in itself any peculiar attunity of thrutting their heads into the tractive charms to those who think pillory at Georgia, being sworn at High- themselves out of the world, if they are gate, and rolling down Flamstead Hill, not within the sound of Bow Bell. To in the park at Greenwich. As they all most of our cockneys it serves only as aim at going into the country, nothing an excuse for eating and drinking; and can be a greater risfortune to the meaner they get out of town, merely because part of the inhabitants of London and they have nothing to do at home. A Weft:nontier, than a rainy Sunday: and brick-kiln smells as sweet to them as a how many honeft people woull be baulk- farm-yard; they would pass by a barn ed of a ride once a week, if the legislature or an hay.itack without notice; but was to limit the hired one-horle chaises they rejoice at the right of every hedge working on that day to a certain num. ale-ho'ite, that promiles good home. ber, as well as the backney coaches ? brewed. As the rest of a cit's life is

regular

regular and uniform, his Sunday diver- Going to church may, indeed, be fions have as little variety; and if he reckoned among our Sunday amule. was to take a journal of them, we might ments, as it is made a mere matter of fuppose that it would run much in the diversion among many well-meaning following manner.

people, who are induced to appear in a

place of worship fiom the same motives SUNDAY.--Overslept myself - Did that they frequent other public places. not rise till nincs Was a full hour in To fome' it aniwers all the purposes of a pulling on my new double-channelled rout or affembly—to see and be seen by pumps—Could get no breakfast, my their acquaintance; and from their bows, wife being busy in dressing herself for nods, curises, and loud conversations, church.

one might conclude, that they imagined At ten-Family at church-Self themselves in a drawing room. To walked to Mother Red Cap's-Smok- others it affords the cheap opportunity ed half a pipe, and drank a pint of the of thewing their taste for dress. Not a Alderman's. N. B. The beer not so few, I believe, are drawn together in our good as at the Adam and Eve at Pan- cathedrals and larger churches by the cras.

influence of the music rather than the Dined at one-Pudding not boiled prayers ; and are kept awake by a jig enough, suet musty--Wife was to drive from the organ-loft, though they are me in an one-horfe chair to see Mother lulled to sleep by the harangue from the Wells at Enfield Wash, but it looked pulpit. A well-disposed Christian will likely to r:in-Took a nap and posted go a mile from bis' own house to the seven pages from my day-book till Temple Church, not because a Sherlock five. Mem. Colonel Promise has loft is to preach, but to hear a Solo from his ele&tion, and is turned out of his Stanley, place-To arreft him to-morrow. But though going to church may be

At fix-Mrs. Deputy to drink tea deenied a kind of amusement, yet upon with my wife-I hate their flip-flops modern principles it appears such a very -Called on my neighbour the Com- odd one, that I am at a loss to account mon-council-man, and took a walk for the reasons which induced our anwith him to Islington.

cestors to give into that method of pairFrom seven to eight-Smoked a ing their Sunday. At leatt it is so pipe at the Castle, eat an heart.cake, wholly incompatible with the polite lyfand drank two pints of cyder. N. B. tem of life, that a person of fashion (as To drink cyder often, because neigh- affairs are now managed) finds it ablobour tells me it is good for the stone lutely impossible to comply with this and gravel.

practice. Then again, the service alAt nine-Got to town again, very ways begins at such unfashionable hours, much fatigued with the journey-Pulls that in the morning a man must huddle ed off my claret. coloured coat, and blue on his cloaths, like a boy to run to school, fattin waistcoat-Went to club, smoke and in an afternoon muft inevitably go ed three pipes, came home at twelve, without his dinner. In order to remove and slept very foundly, till the prentice all these objections, and that some Ritual called me to go and take out a writ may be eitablished in this kingdom, againt Colonel Promise.

agreeable to our inclinations, and conAs to persons of quality, like Lady Scheme has been lately sent me, in or

fiftent with our practice, the following Loverule in the farce, they cannot see der to submit it to the serious confiderawhy one day should he more holy than tion of the public. another: therefore Sunday wears the fame face with them as the rest of the Imprimis, It is humbly proposed, that week. Accordingly, for some part of Christianity be entirely abolished by act this summer, Ranelagh was opened on of parliament, and that no other reliSunday evenings; and I cannot help gion be imposed on us in it's stead; but wondering that the custom did not con- as the age grows daily more and more tinue. It must have been very conve. enlightened, we may at last be quite denient to pass away the time there, till livered from the influence of superstition the hour of meeting at the card-table; and bigotry, and it was certainly more decent to fix Secondly, That in order to prevent aflignations there than at church. our ever relapsing into pious errors, and

H 2

that more.

that the common people may not lose day, Trinity Sunday, &c. be still pretheir holiday, every Sunday be set apart lerved; but that on those days discourses to commemorate our victory over all re- be delivered suitable to the occasion, ligion; that the Churches be turned into containing a refutation of the Nativity, Free thinking Meeting houses, and dif- the Refurrection, the Trinity, &c. courses read in them to confute the doc. Fifthly, That instead of the vile me. trine of a future ftate, the immortality lody of a clerk bawling out two staves of the foul, and other absurd notions, of Sternhold and Hopkins, or a cathewhich some people now regard as ob- dral choir singing anthems from the jects of helief.

psalter, some of the most fashionable Thirdly, That a Ritual be compiled cantatas, opera airs, fongs, or catches, exactly opposite to our present Liturgy; be performed by the best voices for the and that, instead of reading portions of entertainment of the company. Scripture, the first and second lessons Lastly, That the whole service be Shall consist of a section of the Poithu- conducted with such taste and elegance, mous Works of Lord Bolingbroke, or as may render these Free-thinking Meet. of a few pages from the writings of ing-houses as agreeable as the Theatres; Spinoza, Chubb, Maundeville, Hobbs, and that they may be even more judiCollins, Tindal, &c. from which writ. cioully calculated for the propagation of ers the preachers shall also take their atheism and infidelity, than the Robin text.

Hood Society, or the Oratory in Clare Fourthly, That the usual Feasts and Market, Faits, viz. Christmas Day, Easter Sun.

N° XXVII. THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1754.

EARBARA, CELARENT, DARII, FERIO, BARALIPTON.

WORDS FULL OF SOUND, BUT QUITE DE VOID OF SENSE.

IT
Tis a heavy tax upon authors, that the ear, are the best fuccedaneum for

they should always be expected to sense. Nothing so effcctually answers write fense. Some few indeed, who are Mr. Bayes's endeavour to elevate and rich in sentiment, pay this tax very surprise; and the reader, though he sees chearfully; but the generality endeavour nothing but straws foat on the surface, one way or another to elude it. For this candidly supposes, that there are pearls purpo.e some have moulded their pieces and diamonds at the bottom. Several into the form of wings, axes, eggs, and dull authors, by availing themselves of altars; while others have laced down this secret, have passed for very deep the side of a copy of verses with the let.' writers; and arrant nonsense has as ofters of their mistress's name, and called ten laid snugly beneath hard words, as it an acroftic: not to mention the curi- a shallow pate beneath the solemn apous inventions of rebuses and anagrams, pearance of a full-bottomed periwig. For the same reasons, the modern song- Those who are employed in what writers for our public gardens, who are they call abstract speculations, most our principal love-poers at present, en- commonly have recourse to this method. tertain us with sonnets and madrigals in Their dissertations are naturally expect. Crambo. Authors, who promise wit, ed to illustrate and explain; but this is pay us off with puns and quibbles; and sometimes a talk above their abilities: with our writers of comedy, long swords, and when they have led the reader into Thort jerkins, and tables with carpets a maze, from which they cannot deliver over them, pass for incident and hu- him, they very wisely bewilder him the

This is the case with those proBut no artifice of this fort has been found writers, who have treated con. so often and so successfully practiled, cerning the essence of matter, who talk as the immoderate use of uncouth terms very gravely of cuppeity), tableity, íal. and expressions. Words that mean no. low-candleily, and twenty other things thing, provided they found big, and fill with as much found and as little signifi

cations

nour.

« PredošláPokračovať »