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NO XXXI. THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 1754.

X2U, PUERI, NEU TANTA ANIMIS ASSU ESCITE BELLA.

VIRG.

NO MORE, YE BLOODS, ENCOUNTER WITH EACH OTHER,
BUT LACH FINE GENTLEMAN EMBRACE HIS BROTHER.

Y

TO MR. TOWN.

to deep play, but it raises very serious

reflections in me. When I have seen a ste,

young nobleman offer a large stake, I OU must have observed a paragraph have considered him as setting his life

in the news-papers dated from Dub. upon a card, or (like King Richard) lin, which informs us, ' The spirit of Jaying it upon a cast, and standing • Duelling is now become so common, the hazard of the die.' I have even

that scarce a day passes without one imagined, that I heard bullets rattle in • or more being fought in or near that the dice-box, and that I saw challenges • metropolis. I am very much alarmed, written upon every card on the table. left this madness should cross the seas: The ladies also are frequently the to say the truth, I almost begin to think cause of Duels; though it mult be owned, it necessary, that the frequent importa. in justice to the better part of the sex,

tion of Irishmen into this kingdom that where one is fought on account of • fhould, for some time be prohibited; a modest woman, ten are occasioned by

and an embargo laid on those ships that prostitutes. The stout knights-errant, are freighted with contraband Duellifts. who entertain a passion for the faithless It is your duty, Mr. Town, at least to Dulcineas of Drury Lane and Covent do all in your power to prevent the in. Garden, find frequent opportunities of fluence which the conduct of these heroic manifesting their prowess. They not gentlemen, who cannot suffer their swords only encounter with bullies and bra. to fleep quietly in their scabbards, may voes, but sometimes meet with other have on our young fellows: I must there enamoratos as fond and as mad as them. fore beg of you to put together a few selves. I am personally acquainted thoughts on this occasion; and though with two gentlemen of this turn, who the lubject has been often treated be held out pistols at each other across a fore, I cannot but imagine that there is bed at one of these ladies lodgings, and fufficient room left for you to expatiate toffed up which should fire fift. The on it. It is usual among the bishops, pistol however luckily missed fire, and when they find any particular vice pre gave them time to think better of it: so vail, to send orders to the clergy of their they very amicably shook hands, laid respective dioceses to preach against it. down their pistols, and went to bed to In like manner it is your duty, as Сen the lady together. These females are for General, to attack the reigning fol not content, it seems, with the conquests lies: and it is surely as easy for you to commonly made by the fair, but often throw them into a new light, as it is for pass a more cruel sentence on their capthe clergy to preach different sermons tives. Their lovers not only suffer on the farne text.

those metaphorical deaths, which all You will undoubtedly agree with their tribe must endure, but are often me, that gaming is one of the principal really killed in serious truth and sober causes of Duels, and that many a young sadness. They are not only shot through fellow has owed his death to cards and the heart by an accidental glance of the dice. As the gaming-houses are often eyes, but often have a brace of balls filled with rogues in lace, and harpers lodged in their heads: and are not only in erdbroidery, an honeit but rath'ad ' stabbed through the liver' (as Merventurer often loses his temper with his cutio has it)' by the blind bow-boy's money, and begins to fufpe&t that the " butt-haft, but they may perhaps be cards are packed, or the dice loaded; and engaged in a duel with a rival, in which then very wisely risks his life, because they are run through the body. he finds it impossible to recover his cash. A foreign Count was once challenged Upon this account I am never witness by one of these hot-headed gentlemen ;

and

and I shall conclude my letter by re- perhaps they liold their title to the best commending his method to our modern company by the same tenure that the Duellifts. The place of battle appointed Knaves keep their rank among the Ho. was the Count's house; and when the nours in a pack of cards. But the farious challenger came in, breathing grand distinguishing mark of a Fine pothing but revenge, he was surprised Gentleman is the wearing a sword. to find the Count fitting very composed- Gentility displays itself in a well-fancied ly with a candle and a barrel at his side. sword-knot, and honour lies sheathed

This, Sir," said the Count,'is a barrel in the scabbard. All who bear arms of gunpowder; and if you please, we

have a claim to this character: even our « will take our chance who shall set fire common soldiers (like the knights of e to it, you or I.' The gentleman, old) are dubbed Gentlemen on the shoulainazed at so extraordinary a proposal, der; with this only difference, that inmade no answer ; upon which the Count Itead of the sword, the ceremony is perTighted a match, and waving it over the formed by a brown musket. mouth of the barrel, cried out Get Upon thesë and many other weighty • out of the room, Sir, or I will set fire considerations, I have resolved not to • to the powder this inftant.' This disturb the tranquillity of the polite abated our challenger's wrath fo confi. world, by railing at their darling vices. derably, that the Count was rid of him A Cenfor may endeavour to new-cock in a moment, and he was glad to leave an hat, to raise the stays, or write down the room without any satisfaction. I the Mort petticoat, at his pleasure. Perthall expect something from you on this sons of quality will vary fashions of fubject, and am, Sir, your humble themselves, but will always adhere fteafervant,

dily to their vices. I heve besides reEPHRAIM MAKEPEACE. ceived several letters from surgeons and

younger brothers, defiring me to proI Mall not refuse, in compliance with mote as far as lays in my power the mo. the request of my correspondent; to give dern way of life, and especially the my animadversions on this subject; but practice of Duelling. The former open as I am not inclined to measure swords their case in the most pathetic terms, on this occasion with any of my prede. and assure me that if it was not for cessors or cotemporaries, I fall take a Duels, and the amorous rencounters of different course, and appear in the cause Finc Gentlemen with the other sex, their as an advocate for Duelling. The vices profession would scarce support them. and follies of the fashionable world are As to the young gentlemen, they inso connected with each other, that they veigh bitterly against the unequal difalmost form a regular system; and the tribution of property by the laws of practice of them all is absolutely neces- England, and offer me very considerable fary to complete the character of a Fine bribes, if I will espouse the cause of Gentleman. A Fine Gentleman (in Duels and Debauchery; without which the modern sense of the word) is one they scarce have any tolerable chance of that whores, games, and wears a sword. coming in for the family estate. Running after loose women is, indeed, Swift somewhere observes, that these in fome measure common to this exalt. differences very rarely happen among ed part of mankind with the vulgar: men of sense, and he does not see any but to live in bagnios, to be kept in great harm if two worthless fellows send repair by Rock or Ward by the quar- each other out of the world. I shall ter, to be in a continual course of pill therefore humbly propose, the more ef. and electuary, and to make a business fectually to keep up this fpirit, that of fornication, is the peculiar privilege Duels may be included in the Licenceof a Fine Gentleman.' Gaming is also A&t among our other public diverfions, an essential requisite to this character, with a reftraining clause, taking away and is indeed capable of itself to create all power from the Justices to prohibit a perfon a Gentleman, who has no other thele entertainments. I would also propretensions to that title. The greatest pose, for the better accommodation of Icoundrels, provided they were game. the public, that scaffolds be erected befters, have always been permitted to hind Montague House, or in any other asociate with people of fashion; and convenient. place, as there are now at

Tyburn;

Tyburn; and that, whenever any two By this scheme, the public would have gentlemen quarrel, they fall insert their an opportunity t“ being present at these challenges in the daily papers, after fafionable amulernents, and might rethe following manner, in imitation of vive that loft species of gaming, so much the late champions at Broughton's Am- lamented in our lait paper, by laying phitheatre,

bets on the issue of the combat. I, JOHN MAC-Duel, having been

It should also be provided, that if affronted by Richard Flath, hereby chal- bodies be delivered to the furgeons to

either or both are killed, the body or lenge him to meet me behind Montague he anatomized, and placed in their hall; House on the day of through all the exercise of the Small unless the younger brother or next heir Sword; to advance, retire, parry and hall give them an equivalent. thrult, in Carte, Tierce, and Segoon, above-mentioned act, that no person be

It Thould also be provided by the and to take my life, or lose his own. JOHN MAC-Duel. qualified to fight a Duel, who is not worth sool. per ann.

For as it is unI, RICHARD FLASH, who have spit- sportsinan-like to admit dunghill cocks ted many such daftardly fellows on my into the pit, so it would render this infword like larks, promise to meet John estiinable privilege less valuable, if every Mac-Duel, and doubt not, by running mean wretch had a right of being run him through the body, to give him through the body, who could do the Gentleman-like satisfaction.

public no service by his death. RICHARD FLASH,

T

No XXXII. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1754.

EMUNCTÆ NABJS.

Hor.
A PLAIN BLUNT FELLOW, WHO, LIKE SCENTED BEAUX,
WITH VILE PULVILIO NE'ER BEGRIM'D HIS NOSE.

TO MR. TOWN.

to observe almost every one ' drawing

out his pouncet-box, and ever and SIR,

anon giving it to his nose,' he would I

addicted to a filthy practice, which ter than a nation of Hottentots; and is frequent among all ranks of people, that every one was obliged t'; cram his though detestable even among the lowelt. nostrils with a quantity of scented diit, The practice I mean is that of Snuff- to fence them from the disagreeable ef. taking; which I cannot help regarding fuvia of the reit of the company. Inas a national plague, that, like another deed, it might not be absurd in such a epideinical distemper, has taken hold of stranger to imagine, that the person he our noses. You authors may perhaps conversed with fook Snuff, for the same claim it as a privilege, since Snuff is reason that another might press his noffupposed by you to whet the invention, trils together between his finger and and every one is not possessed of Bayes's thumb, to exclude an ill linell. admirable receipt, the Spirit of brains.' It is cuitomary among those polite But give me leave to tell you, that Snuff people the Dutch, to carry with them should no more be administered in pub- every where their short dingy pipes, and lic, than that of Major's medicinal com smoke and spit about a room even in the position at four-pence a pinch, or any presence of ladies. This piece of goodother dose of physic. I know not why breeding, however ridiculous it may people should be allowed to annoy their seein, is surely not more offensive to good friends and acquaintance by mearing manners than the practice of Snuff-taktheir noses with a dirty powder, any ing. A very Dutchman would think more than in using an eye-water, or it odd, that a people, who pretensi to rubbing their teeth with a dentrifice. politenels, showid he continually snuff

If a stranger to this nalty cultom was ing up a parcel of tobacco-dust; nor

can

can I help laughing, when I see a man set a fneezing by the odorous effluvia every minute stealing out a dirty muck- arising from the boxes that surround me. ender, then fneaking it in again, as But it is not only my sense of smelling much ashamed of his pocket-companion, that is offended : you will stare when I as he would be to carry a dishclout about tell you, that I am forced to taste, and bin.

even to eat and drink this abominable It is, indeed, impossible to go into Snuff. If I drink tea with a certain any large company without being dif- lady, I generally perceive what escapes turbed by this abominable practice. The from her fingers swimming at the top of church and the play-house continually my cup; but it is always attributed to echoe with this music of the nose, and the foulness of the milk or dross of the in every corner you may hear them in fugar. I never dine at a particular concert snuffling, freezing, hawking, friend's house, but I am sure to have as and grunt.ng like a drove of hogs. The much rappee as pepper with my turnips ; molt pathetic speech in a tragedy has nor can I drink my table-beer out of been interrupted by the blowing of noses the same mug with him, for fear of in the front and fide hoxes; and I have coughing from his fnuff, if not the liknown a whole congregation suddenly quor, going the wrong way. Such eterrailed from their knees in the middle of nai Snuff takers as my friend, should, a prayer by the violent coughing of an I think, at meal-times, have a screen old lady, who has been almolt choaked flapping down over the nose and mouth, by a pinch of snuff in giving vent to an under which they might convey their ejaculation. A celebrated actor has food, as you may have seen at the marspoiled his voice by this absurd treatment querade : or at least they should be se. of his nose, whiclyhas inade his racu- parated from the rest of the company, lation as dull and drowsy as the hum of and placed by tiremselves at the sidea bag pipe; and the parson of our parish table, like the children. js often forced to break off in the middle This practice of Snuff-taking, howof a period, to snort behind his white ever inexcusable in the men, is still more handkerchief.

abominable in the other fex. Neatness Is it not a wonder, Mr. Town, that and cleanliness ought to be always cul. Snuff, which is certainly an enemy to tivated among the women; but how can dress, should yet gain admittance among any female appear tolerably clean, who those who have no other merit than their so industriously bedaubs herself with cloaths ? I am not to be told, that your Snuff? I have with pain observed the men of fathion take Snuff only to dif- snow white surface of an handkerchief play a white hand perhaps, or the bril or apron sullied with the scatterings from liancy of a diamond ring: and I am the 'Snuff-box; and whenever I fee a confident, that numbers would never lady thus besmeared with Scotch or Hahave defled themselves with the use of vannah, I consider her as no cleanlier Snuff, had they not been seduced by the than the kitchen-wench scouring her charms of a fathionable box. The man brasses, and begrimed with brickduft of talte takes his Strasburg veritable and fuller's earth. Housewifely accom. taboc from a right Paris paper-box; plishments are at present seldom required and the pretty fellovy uses an enamelled in a well-bred woman; or else I should box lined in the infide with polished me little expect to find a wife in the least tal, that by often opening it, he may notable, who keeps up such a constant have the opportunity of stealing a glance correspondence between her fingers and at his own tweet person, reflected in the nose; nor, indeed, would any one think lid of it.

her hands at all fit to be employed in Though I abhor Snuff taking myself, making a pudding. and would as foon be fmothered in a It ihould be remembered by the cloud raifed by smoking tobacco, as I younger part of your fair readers, Mr. would willingly futter the least atom of Town, that Souff is an implacable eneit to tickle my nose, yet am I exposed my to the complexion, which in time is to many disgusting inconveniencies from sure to take a tinge from it: they should the use of it by others. Sometimes I therefore be as ciutious of acquiring a am cloaked by drawing in with my fallow hue from this hane of a fair skin, breath fome of the fineft particles toge- as of being tanned er freckled by exther with the air; and I am frequently posing their delicate faces to the scorch

ing

ing rays of the fun. Besides, as the could be still laves to Snuff, to have nole has been always reckoned a prin- their nostrils bored through as well as cipal ornament of the face, they should their ears; and instead of jewels, to bear' be as careful to preserve the beauty of it rolls of pigtail bobbing over their upperas of any other feature, and not suffer lips. it to be undermined or bloated by co per We cannot otherwise account for this nicious an application as Snuff-taking. fashion among the women, fo unnatural For ny own part, I should as soon ad to their fex, than that they want employmire a celebrated toast with no nose at ment for their hands. It was formerly all, as to see it prostituted to so vile a no disgrace for a young lady to be seen purpose. They'fhould also consider, in the best company bufied with her that the nose is fituated very near the work: but a girl now-a-days would as lips: and what relish can a lover find in soon be surprised in twirling a spinningthe honey of the latter, if at the same wheel, as in handling a thread paper, time he is obliged to come into close con. The fan or the Snuff box are now the tact with the dirt and rubbish of the for- only implements they dare to use in pubmer? Rather than Snuff-taking should lic: yet furely it would be much more prevail among the ladies, I could with becoming to have the fore-finger pricked it were the fashion for them to wear rings and scarified with the point of a needle, in their noses, like the favage nations: than to see it embrowned with squeezing nay, I would even carry it ftill farther, together a filthy pinch of Snuff. I am, and oblige those pretty females, whesit, your humble servant, &c.

T

No XXXII. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1754.

AT TU SUB URBE POSSIDES FAMEM MUNDAM,
ET TURRE AB ALTA PROSPICIS MERAS LAURUS ;
PICTAMQUE PORTAS OTIOSUS AD VILLAM
OLUS, OVA, PULLOS, POMA, CASEUM, MUSTUM.
RUS HOC VOCARI DLBET, AN DOMUS LONGE?

MART

A LITTLE COUNTRY BOX YOU BOAST;
SO NEAT, 'TIS COVER'D ALL WITH DUST;
AND NOUGHT ABOUT IT TO BE SEEN,
EXCEPT A NETTLE-BED, THAT'S GREEN :
YOUR VILLA! RURAL BUT THE NAME IN,
SO DESART, IT WOULD BREED A FAMIXI.
HITHER, ON SUNDAYS, YOU REPAIR,
WHILE HEAPS OF VIANDS LOAD THE CHAIR,
WITH POULTRY BROUGHT TROM LLADENHALL,
AND CABBAGE FROM THE HUCKSTER'S STALL,
'TIS NOT THE COUNTRY, YOU MUST OWN;
'TIS ONLY LORDON OUT OF TOWN.

TO MR. TOWN.

language, wear the same dress, and use

the same customs with himself. He, in,

who had spent all his life within the Remember to have seen a little French 'fight of Pont-Neuf, looked upon every

novel, giving an account of a citizen one, who lived out of Paris, as a toof Paris making an excurfion into the reigner; and though the utmost extent country. He imagines himself about of his travels was not three miles, he was to undertake a long voyage to some as much surprised, as he would have . frange region, where the natives were been to meet with a colony of Frenchas different from the inhabitants of his men on the Terra Incognita. own city, as the most diftant nations. Most of our late novels are, with He accordingly takes boat, and is land- fome little variation of circumstances, ed at a village about a league from the borrowed from the French: but if we capital. When he is set on shore, he is thould endeavour to adapt the novel I amazed to find the people talk the same have been speaking of io a citizen of

London,

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