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Hand in hand, with fairy grace.
Will we sing, and bless this place.

SONG AND DANCE.

1

Obe. Now, until the break of day.
Through this house each fairy stray.
To the best bride-bed will we,
Which by us shall blessed be ;'
And the issue, there create,
Ever shall be fortunate.
So shall all the couples three
Ever true in loving be.
And the blots of nature's hand
Shall not in their issue stand.
Never mole, hare-lip, nor scar,
Nor mark prodigious, such as are
Despised in nativity,
Shall upon their children be.-
With this field-dew consecrate,
Every fairy take his gate; :
And each several chamber bless,
Through this palace with sweet peace
E'er shall it in safety rest,
And the owner of it blest.

Trip away ;

Make no stay;
Meet me all by break of day.

[Exeunt OBERON, TITANIA, and Train Puck. If we shadows have offended,

Think but this, (and all is mended,)
That you have but slumbered here,
While these visions did appear,
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream.
Gentles, do not reprehend;
If you pardon, we will mend.

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I This ceremony was in old times used at all marriages Portentous.

3 Way, course.

1

And, as I'm an honest Puck,
If we have unearned luck,
Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue,
We will make amends, ere long ;
Else the Puck a liar call.
So, good night unto you

all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

[Exit

1 i. e. if we have better fortune than we have deserved. ? i. e. hisses. 3 Clap your hands; give us your applause. VOL. II.

10

Wild and fantastical as this play is, all the parts, in their various modes, are well written, and give the kind of pleasure which the author designed. Fairies in his time were much in fashion; common tradition had made them familiar, and Spenser's poem had made them great.

Johnson.

Johnson's concluding observations on this play are not conceived with his usual judgment. There is no analogy or resemblance between the fairies of Spenser and those of Shakspeare. The fairies of Spenser, as appears from his description of them in the second book of the Faerie Queene, canto X., were a race of mortals created by Prometheus, of the human size, shape, and affections, and subject to death. But those of Shakspeare, and of common tradition, as Johnson calls them, were a diminutive race of sportful beings, endowed with immortality and supernatural powers, totally different from those of Spenser.

M. MASON

And, as I'm an honest Puck,
If we have unearned luck,
Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue, a
We will make amends, ere long ;
Else the Puck a liar call.
So, good night unto you

all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

(Exit

1 i. e. if we have better fortune than we have deserved ? i. e. hisses. 3 Clap your hands; give us your applauna. VOL. 11.

10

Wild and fantastical as this play is, all the parts, in their various modes, are well written, and give the kind of pleasure which the author designed. Fairies in his time were much in fashion; common tradition had made them familiar, and Spenser's poem had made them great.

JOHNSON.

Johnson's concluding observations on this play are not conceived with his usual judgment. There is no analogy or resemblance between the fairies of Spenser and those of Shakspeare. The fairies of Spenser, as appears from his description of them in the second book of the Faerie Queene, canto X., were a race of mortals created by Prometheus, of the human size, shape, and affections, and subject to death. But those of Shakspeare, and of common tradition, as Johnson calls them, were a diminutive race of sportful beings, endowed with immortality and super. natural powers, totally different from those of Spenser.

M. MASON

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