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LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST.

PRELIMINARY REMARKS.

The novel upon which this comedy was founded has hitherto eluded the research of the commentators. Mr.

Douce thinks it will prove to be of French extraction. “ The Dramatis Personæ in a great measure demonstrate this, as well as a palpable Gallicism in Act iv. Sc. 1: viz. the terming a letter a capon.

This is one of Shakspeare's early plays, and the author's youth is certainly perceivable, not only in the style and manner of the versification, but in the lavish superfluity displayed in the execution—the uninterrupted succession of quibbles, equivoques, and sallies of every description. “The sparks of wit fly about in such profusion that they form complete fireworks, and the dialogue for the most part resembles the bustling col lision and banter of passing masks at a carnival.”.* The scene in which the king and his companions detect each other's breach of their mutual vow, is capitally contrived. The discovery of Biron's love-letter while rallying his friends, and the manner in which he extricates himself, by ridiculing the folly of the vow, are admirable.

The grotesque characters, don Adrian de Armado, Nathaniel the curate, and Holofernes, that prince of pedants, with the humors of Costard the clown, are well contrasted with the sprightly wit of the principal characters in the play. It has been observed that “ Biron and Rosaline suffer much in comparison with Benedick and Beatrice,” and it must be confessed that there is some justice in the observation. Yet Biron, “that merry mad-cap lord," is not overrated in Rosaline's admirable character of him

A merrier man,
Within the limit of becoming mirth,
I never spent an hour's talk withal :
His eye begets occasion for his wit;
For every object that the one doth catch,
The other turns to a mirth-moving jest ;-

So sweet and voluble is his discourse." Shakspeare has only shown the inexhaustible powers of his mind, in mm. proving on the admirable originals of his own tion, in a more ma

Malone placed the composition of this play first in 1591, afterwards in 1594. Dr. Drake thinks we may safely assign it to the earlier period The first edition was printed in 1598.

ture age.

* Schlegel.

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