Aristotle's Philosophy of Friendship

Predný obal
SUNY Press, 1. 1. 1995 - 233 strán (strany)
Presents the major issues in Aristotle's writings on Friendship.

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Zvolené strany

Obsah

SELFHOOD
11
SELVES AND OTHER SELVES
37
FOR THE SAKE OF THE OTHER
59
SELFLOVE
79
SELFLOVE AND EGOISM
103
SELFSUFFICIENCY
123
FRIENDSHIP JUSTICE AND THE STATE
147
CONCLUSION
171
NOTES
179
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
211
AUTHOR INDEX
221
SUBJECT INDEX
223
INDEX LOCORUM
227
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Populárne pasáže

Strana 97 - I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends...
Strana 147 - When several villages are united in a single complete community, large enough to be nearly or quite self-sufficing, the state comes into existence, originating in the bare needs of life, and continuing in existence for the sake of a good life. And therefore, if the earlier forms of society are natural, so is the state, for it is the end of them, and the nature of a thing is its end. For what each thing is when fully developed, we call its nature, whether we arc speaking of a man, a horse, or a family.
Strana 24 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Strana 204 - ... learn, even at school, the habit of obedience. On the other hand, the very poor, who are in the opposite extreme, are too degraded. So that the one class cannot obey, and can only rule despotically; the other knows not how to command and must be ruled like slaves. Thus arises a city, not of freemen, but of masters and slaves, the one despising, the other envying; and nothing can be more fatal to friendship and good fellowship in states than this...
Strana 128 - The proof that the state is a creation of nature and prior to the individual is that the individual, when isolated, is not selfsufficing; and therefore he is like a part in relation to the whole. But he who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god: he is no part of a state.
Strana 160 - The community is a fictitious body, composed of the individual persons who are considered as constituting as it were its members. The interest of the community then is— what? The sum of the interests of the several members who compose it.
Strana 77 - Hence poetry is something more philosophic and of graver import than history, since its statements are of the nature rather of universals, whereas those of history are singulars.
Strana 155 - ... which he may use for the worst ends. Wherefore, if he have not virtue, he is the most unholy and the most savage of animals, and the most full of lust and gluttony. But justice is the bond of men in states, for the administration of justice, which is the determination of what is just, is the principle of order in political society.
Strana 127 - Moreover, we think happiness is most choiceworthy of all goods, since it is not counted as one good among many. If it were counted as one among many, then, clearly, we think that the addition of the smallest of goods would make it more choiceworthy...
Strana 59 - We may describe friendly feeling towards any one as wishing for him what you believe to be good things, not for your own sake but for his, and being inclined, so far as you can, to bring these things about.

O tomto autorovi (1995)

Suzanne Stern-Gillet is Professor of Philosophy at the Bolton Institute of Higher Education, England.

Bibliografické informácie