The Mill on the Floss

Predný obal
Wordsworth Editions, 1995 - 459 strán (strany)

Introduction and Notes by R.T. Jones, Honorary Fellow of the University of York.

This novel, based on George Eliot's own experiences of provincial life, is a masterpiece of ambiguity in which moral choice is subjected to the hypocrisy of the Victorian age.

As the headstrong Maggie Tulliver grows into womanhood, the deep love which she has for her brother Tom turns into conflict, because she cannot reconcile his bourgeois standards with her own lively intelligence. Maggie is unable to adapt to her community or break free from it, and the result, on more than one level, is tragedy.

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Prehľad pre používateľa  - Rachel Smith - Christianbook.com

While Eliot's work is tedious to some (like Dickens, she must have been paid by the word), this novel paints a charming portrait of life in mid-nineteenth century England. Critics have long noted the ... Čítať celú recenziu

Obsah

Outside Doricote Mill
5
Mr Tulliver of Dorlcote Mill Declares his Resolution about Tom
7
In Mr Riley Gives his Advice Concerning a School for Tom
12
Tom is Expected
23
Tom Comes Home
28
The Aunts and Uncles are coming
36
Enter the Aunts and Uncles
46
Mr Tulliver Shows His Weaker Side
66
A Love Scene
161
The Golden Gates are passed
165
A Variation of Protestantism
243
A Voice from the Past
252
In the Red Deeps
267
Aunt Glegg Learns the Breadth of Bobs Thumb
277
The Wavering Balance
292
A Duet in Paradise
325

To Garum Firs
74
Maggie Bebaves Worse than She Expected
86
Maggie Tries to Run Away From Her Shadow
92
Mr and Mrs Glegg at Home
102
Mr Tulliver Further Entangles the Skein of Life
113
BOOK SECOND SchoolTime
117
Toms First Half
119
The Christmas Holidays
136
The New Schoolfellow
143
The Young Idea
148
Maggies Second Visit
157
First Impressions
332
Confidential Moments
344
Charity in FullDress
384
In the Lane
398
Borne Along by the Tide
409
The Return to the Mill
433
St Oggs Passes Judgement
439
The Last Conflict
458
Conclusion
468
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O tomto autorovi (1995)

George Eliot was born Mary Ann Evans on a Warwickshire farm in England, where she spent almost all of her early life. She received a modest local education and was particularly influenced by one of her teachers, an extremely religious woman whom the novelist would later use as a model for various characters. Eliot read extensively, and was particularly drawn to the romantic poets and German literature. In 1849, after the death of her father, she went to London and became assistant editor of the Westminster Review, a radical magazine. She soon began publishing sketches of country life in London magazines. At about his time Eliot began her lifelong relationship with George Henry Lewes. A married man, Lewes could not marry Eliot, but they lived together until Lewes's death. Eliot's sketches were well received, and soon after she followed with her first novel, Adam Bede (1859). She took the pen name "George Eliot" because she believed the public would take a male author more seriously. Like all of Eliot's best work, The Mill on the Floss (1860), is based in large part on her own life and her relationship with her brother. In it she begins to explore male-female relations and the way people's personalities determine their relationships with others. She returns to this theme in Silas Mariner (1861), in which she examines the changes brought about in life and personality of a miser through the love of a little girl. In 1863, Eliot published Romola. Set against the political intrigue of Florence, Italy, of the 1490's, the book chronicles the spiritual journey of a passionate young woman. Eliot's greatest achievement is almost certainly Middlemarch (1871). Here she paints her most detailed picture of English country life, and explores most deeply the frustrations of an intelligent woman with no outlet for her aspirations. This novel is now regarded as one of the major works of the Victorian era and one of the greatest works of fiction in English. Eliot's last work was Daniel Deronda. In that work, Daniel, the adopted son of an aristocratic Englishman, gradually becomes interested in Jewish culture and then discovers his own Jewish heritage. He eventually goes to live in Palestine. Because of the way in which she explored character and extended the range of subject matter to include simple country life, Eliot is now considered to be a major figure in the development of the novel. She is buried in Highgate Cemetery, North London, England, next to her common-law husband, George Henry Lewes.

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