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THE IMPRECATORY PASSAGES

IN THE BOOK OF PSALMS,

AND

THE ATHANASIAN CREED.

TWO SERMONS

BY THE

REV. BEAVER H. BLACKER, M.A.,

ST. MARY'S, DONNYBROOK, DUBLIN.

All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for
doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness."
2 Tim. iii. 16.

“ The three Creeds, Nicene Creed, Athanasius's Creed, and that
which is commonly called the Apostles' Creed, ought throughly to be
received and believed ; for they may be proved by most certain warrants
of Holy Scripture."-Art. viii.

LONDON:

WERTHEIM AND MACINTOSH,

24, PATERNOSTER-ROW.
DUBLIN: W. CURRY AND CO., UPPER SACKVILLE-STREET.

1851.

Price Fourpence.

MACINTOSH, PRINTER, GREAT NEW-STREET, LONDON.

ADVERTISEMENT.

are

The following Sermons, which have appeared in the pages of the “Church of England Magazine," are reprinted, and published in their present form, in compliance with the wishes of several kind friends, who heard them when delivered from the pulpit, and think them suitable for general circulation. They treat, indeed, of subjects upon which there very prevalent misconceptions ; the imprecatory passages in the Psalms, and the “ damnatory” clauses in the Athanasian Creed, frequently perplexing the pious reader of God's Word, and giving some semblance to the cavils of the unbeliever. A plain and faithful statement of essential truths -- not anything very original or striking—they profess to give. God, however, “ without whom nothing is strong, nothing is holy,” is often pleased to make use of a feeble instrument. To Him, therefore, if they prove in any wise serviceable to the cause of truth, be all the praise ! “Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us, but unto thy name give glory, for thy mercy, and for thy truth's sake.” (Ps. cxv. 1.)

11, Pembroke-road, Dublin,

1st July, 1851.

THE IMPRECATORY PASSAGES IN

THE BOOK OF PSALMS.

PSALM XXXV. 4–6.

soul;

“Let them be confounded and put to shame that seek after

my let them be turned back and brought to confusion that devise my hurt. Let them be as chaff before the wind; and let the angel of the Lord chase them. Let their way be dark and slippery; and let the angel of the Lord persecute them.”

The Book of Psalms, I need scarcely remind you, has furnished the pious of every age with devout formularies of prayer, and suitable songs of thanksgiving. It even seems to have been the manual of devotion (if we may so term it) used by Him who left for a season the bright glories of heaven for our instruction and redemption ; since we find it recorded that, after His last supper, He retired with His disciples to sing a hymn—which hymn, it is generally supposed, was selected, according to the custom of the Jews, from the Psalms of David; and it is certain that, when in agony upon the cross, He exclaimed, in the words of Psalm xxii. 1, “My God,

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