Principles of design in architecture, a series of letters to a friend

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1809
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Strana 158 - Ask where's the North? at York, 'tis on the Tweed; In Scotland, at the Orcades; and there, At Greenland, Zembla, or the Lord knows where.
Strana 134 - CAITI.I. called the Queen's Oriel is remarkable for the fancy, luxuriance, and elegance of the workmanship. Nor is the contrivance of the little terraced garden below, considering the history of the times, a matter of small curiosity, where, though all the surrounding country were hostile, fresh air might be safely enjoyed ; and the commanding view of the singularly beautiful landscape around, from both that little herbary or garden, and the bay window or oriel, is so managed as to leave no doubt...
Strana 197 - Jungere si velit, et varias inducere plumas Undique collatis membris, ut turpiter atrum Desinat in piscem mulier formosa superne, Spectatum admissi risum teneatis, amici...
Strana 271 - I venture to deliver it as . my opinion that there are only two characters of buildings: the one may be called perpendicular, and the other horizontal. Under the first, I class all buildings erected in England before and during the early part of Queen Elizabeth's reign, whether deemed Saracenic, Saxon, Norman, or the Gothic of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries ; and even that peculiar kind called Queen Elizabeth's Gothic, in which turrets prevailed, though battlements were discarded and Grecian...
Strana 133 - Conway," observes an anonymous author, "what is called the Queen's Oriel is remarkable for the fancy, luxuriance, and elegance of the workmanship. Nor is the contrivance of the little terraced garden below, considering the history of the times, a matter of small curiosity, where, though all the surrounding country were hostile, fresh air might be safely enjoyed; and the commanding view of the singularly beautiful landscape around, from both that little herbary or garden, and the bay window or oriel...
Strana 258 - ... above may be increased, or must be diminished, according to circumstances. If a greater width of foundation be thought necessary, it must be gained by increasing the number of the footings, and not their width. The height of abutment, and span, and rise of arch, I suppose prescribed for the engineer.
Strana 86 - Instead of a mere sacristy for the priests, the term at which the pomp of processions ended, and in front of which, under the vault of the sky...
Strana 44 - Tis with our judgements as our watches, none Co just alike, but each believes his own.

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