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PRELIMINARY MATTER.

I. SOURCES AND PHENOMENA OF GNOSTICISM.

II. LIFE AND WRITINGS OF S. IRENÆUS.

ABSTRACT OF PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS.

GNOSTICISM, a recurrence to ancient principles, i.
Primitive religious belief, ii.—v.; Chaldæa, vi. vii.; ancient Persia, viii.-X.
Zoroastrian modification, xi.; not essentially Dualistic, xii. xiii.; Zoroastrian Word,

xiii. xiv.; evil relative, and absolute, xiv. xv.; certain analogies with a
truer theology accounted for, xvi.; Persian system neither Polytheistic
nor idolatrous, xvii.

Egyptian system, soon degenerated into Polytheism, xviii. xix.; Platonic analo

gies, xx.xxiii.; Valentinian analogies, xxiii.-xxvi.; Egypt the source

of Greek mythology and of Greek civilization, xxvi.xxviii. Greek philosophy eclectic in its principle, xxviii. ; Pythagoras, Plato, Thales, De

mocritus, reverted to Egypt, xxx.-xxxiv.

Greek physical philosophy, XXXV.—xl. ; supplied certain elements of Gnostic

terminology, xl. Philosophical grŵois, xl. xli. ; Alexandrian eclecticism as involving Pythagorean

views, and Præ-Platonic notions, xlii.- xlv.; variously modified by Platonicism, xlvi.lii.; also the incorporation of Oriental modes of thought,

lii.; principal eclectic innovators, liii. Jewish Cabbala, compared with the Zend Avesta, liv. lv. Philo Judæus, lv.; religious element added to philosophy, lvi. Recapitulation, lvii.—lix. yuwois, philosophical, oriental, and mystical, lx.--lxii.; all combined in Philo,

Ixiii.; and to be dealt with as a complex idea, lxiv. Simon Magus, the first Gnostic teacher who adopted a Christology in his Cab.

balistico-Zoroastrian theosophy, lxv. Ixvi.; his own exponent, lxvii.; Valentinian rationale indicated, lxvüi.

Menander, of the same Samaritan school, lxix.

Nicolaitans taught the same theory of creation, lxx.
As did Cerinthus; it may be traced through Philo to Zoroaster, lxxi. ; rationale of

Docetic theory, lxxii.; other notions of Cerinthus, ibid.

Ebionites, neither Jews nor Christians, lxxiii. lxxiv.
Carpocrates, widely syncretic, lxxv.; denied that there was any moral quality in

human actions, lxxvi.; his peculiar metensomatosis of the soul, lxxvii.;
Epiphanes, ibid.

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