The Works of Samuel Johnson: The Rambler

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W. Pickering, London; and Talboys and Wheeler, Oxford, 1825
 

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An authors treatment from six patrons 32
142
The observance of Sunday recommended an allegory
146
The defence of a known mistake highly culpable
150
The vanity of stoicism The necessity of patience
156
An allegorical history of Rest and Labour
161
The uneasiness and disgust of female cowardice
165
A marriage of prudence without affection
171
The reasons why pastorals delight
176
The true principles of pastoral poetry
180
The advantages of mediocrity an eastern fable
185
The unhappiness of women whether single or married
190
The difficulty of giving advice without offending 41 The advantages of memory 09
204
The inconveniences of precipitation and confidence
208
Religion and Superstition a vision
213
The causes of disagreement in marriage
218
The mischiefs of rural faction
222
The proper means of regulating sorrow
227
The miseries of an infirm constitution
231
A disquisition upon the value of fame
235
A virtuous old age always reverenced 51 The employments of a housewife in the country
244
The contemplation of the calamities of others a remedy for grief
250
The folly and misery of a spendthrift
251
A deathbed the true school of wisdom The effects of death upon the survivors
258
The gay widows impatience of the growth of her daughter The his tory of Miss Maypole
263
Thc necessity of complaisance The Ramblers grief for offending his correspondents
268
Sententious rules of frugality
273
The desire of wealth moderated by philosophy
277
An account of Suspirius the human screechowl
281
60 The dignity and usefulness of biography
285
Neme PAGE 61 A Londoners visit to the country
290
The necessity of good humour
338
The lingering expectation of an heir
342
Peevishness equally wretched and offensive The character of Tetrica
347
The world never known but by a change of fortune The history of Melissa
352
The arts by which bad men are reconciled to themselves
357
The learned seldom despised but when they deserve contempt
361
The power of novelty Mortality too familiar to raise apprehensions
366
A suspicious man justly suspected
370
Variety necessary to happiness a winter scene
375
The great rule of action Debts of justice to be distinguished from debts of charity
381
The virtuosos account of his rarities
383
The virtuosos curiosity justified
388
A young ladys impatience of controul
393
The mischiefs of total idleness
398
an introduction to a criti cism on Miltons versification
402
The reasons why advice is generally ineffectual 88 A criticism on Miltons versification Elisions dangerous in English poetry
412
The luxury of vain imagination
417
The pauses in English poetry adjusted
421
The conduct of Patronage an allegory 92 The accommodation of sound to the sense often chimerical
431
The prejudices and caprices of criticism 438
438
An inquiry how far Milton has accommodated the sound to the sense 95 The history of Pertinax the sceptick
449
Truth Falsehood and Fiction an allegory
453
Advice to unmarried ladies
458
The necessity of cultivating politeness
464
The pleasures of private friendship The necessity of similar disposi tions
468
NUMB PAGE 100 Modish pleasures
472
A proper audience necessary to a wit
476
The voyage of life
481
The prevalence of curiosity The character of Nugaculus
486
The original of flattery The meanness of venal praise 40
495

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Strana 440 - His praise, ye Winds, that from four quarters blow, Breathe soft or loud ; and, wave your tops, ye Pines, With every plant, in sign of worship wave. Fountains, and ye that warble, as ye flow, Melodious murmurs, warbling tune his praise.
Strana 198 - Happy the man - and happy he alone He who can call today his own, He who, secure within, can say 'Tomorrow, do thy worst, for I have...
Strana 433 - The sound must seem an echo to the sense : Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar: When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line too labours, and the words move slow : Not so, when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.
Strana 421 - Olympian hill I soar, Above the flight of Pegasean wing ! The meaning, not the name, I call ; for thou Nor of the Muses nine, nor on the top Of old Olympus dwell'st ; but...
Strana 309 - ... yet remains one effort to be made ; that reformation is never hopeless, nor sincere endeavours ever unassisted ; that the wanderer may at length return after all his...
Strana 39 - Evil into the mind of God or man May come and go, so unapproved, and leave No spot or blame behind...
Strana 284 - ... more knowledge may be gained of a man's real character, by a short conversation with one of his servants, than from a formal and studied narrative, begun with his pedigree, and ended with his funeral.
Strana 283 - The business of the biographer is often to pass slightly over those performances and incidents which produce vulgar greatness, to lead the thoughts into domestic privacies, and display the minute details of daily life, where exterior appendages are cast aside, and men excel each other only by prudence and by virtue.
Strana 420 - Urania, and fit audience find, though few. But drive far off the barbarous dissonance Of Bacchus and his revellers, the race Of that wild rout that tore the Thracian bard In Rhodope, where woods and rocks had ears To rapture, till the savage clamour drown'd Both harp and voice ; nor could the muse defend Her son.
Strana 306 - Here Obidah paused for a time, and began to consider whether it were longer safe to forsake the known and common track ; but remembering that the heat was now in its greatest violence, and that the plain was dusty and uneven, he resolved to pursue the new path, which he supposed only to make a few meanders, in compliance with the varieties of the ground, and to end at last in the common road.

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