Conflict in Nature and Life: A Study of Antagonism in the Constitution of Things. For the Elucidation of the Problem of Good and Evil, and the Reconcilation of Optimism and Pessimism

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D. Appleton, 1883 - 488 strán (strany)
 

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The war between speciesDeCondolle Spencer Darwin 103
66
CHAPTER XI
112
Mental action counteractionLewes Griesinger Schiff Huxley
118
Analogies illustrating mental reflex actionLewes Spencer
124
Passional balance in mind and in societyHobbes Plato Combe
130
Contest determining the incipient form of order
137
The leading element of moralsUtility stress Stephen
147
Virtue founded in the plurality of interest Tacitus Billson
153
The Conflict definition of morality
159
PART THIRD HISTORICAL BREVITIES ILLUSTRATING CONFLICT CHAPTER XIII
169
Warnecessity first unites peopleInfancyShaftesbury Condorcet Fiske Cicero Morgan Mandeville Spencer Tylor
170
Fealty to chiefsTacitus Freeman Lecky McClellanEarly Ameri can confederationsWoolsey
175
Origin of executive and legislative functionsRowley Spencer Maine
180
National integration and disintegration
181
Progress and reactionStagnant ChinaJapanThe Jews
182
The discord of classinterests increases with development 1
186
Athenian culture
187
State autonomy versus nationality
188
Statealliances versus statealliances
191
Greece succumbed for want of nationality
192
The fashion of war too strong for the traditions of kinship
193
Development in Athens with stagnation in Sparta
195
Growing rationality versus tradition
197
CHAPTER XV
199
The plebeian struggle for political rights 117 The binding and explosive forces within Rome
202
Slavery and piracy
204
Social and civil wars and the fall of the commonwealth
205
Debauchery within aggression without
207
Rigidity of virtue necessary to the greatness of peoples
208

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Strana 43 - All Nature is but Art, unknown to thee; All Chance, Direction, which thou canst not see; All Discord, Harmony not understood; All partial Evil, universal Good : And, in spite of Pride, in erring Reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.
Strana 314 - There are parts of Asia Minor, of Northern Africa, of Greece, and even of Alpine Europe, where the operation of causes set in action by man has brought the face of the earth to a desolation almost as complete as that of the moon ; and though, within that brief space of time xvhich we call
Strana 376 - To make the Society happy and People easy under the meanest Circumstances, it is requisite that great Numbers of them should be Ignorant as well as Poor.
Strana 331 - A greater number of people cannot, in any given state of civilization, be collectively so well provided for as a smaller The niggardliness of nature, not the injustice of society, is the cause of the penalty attached to over-population.
Strana 315 - ... would reduce it to such a condition of impoverished productiveness, of shattered surface, of climatic excess, as to threaten the depravation, barbarism, and, perhaps, even extinction of the species.
Strana 11 - And to Thee is nothing whatsoever evil : yea, not only to Thee, but also to Thy creation as a whole, because there is nothing without, which may break in, and corrupt that order which Thou hast appointed it. But in the parts thereof some things, because unharmonizing with other some, are accounted evil : whereas those very things harmonize with others, and are good ; and in themselves are good.
Strana 107 - The jewelled butterflies ; till everywhere Each slew a slayer and in turn was slain, Life living upon death. So the fair show Veiled one vast, savage, grim conspiracy Of mutual murder, from the worm to man, Who himself kills his fellow...
Strana 8 - Two urns by Jove's high throne have ever stood, The source of evil one, and one of good ; From thence the cup of mortal man he fills, Blessings to these, to those distributes ills ; To most, he mingles both : the wretch decreed To taste the bad, unmix'd, is curst indeed ; Pursued by wrongs, by meagre famine driven, He wanders, outcast both of Earth and Heaven.
Strana 465 - It is indisputable that the being whose capacities of enjoyment are low has the greatest chance of having them fully satisfied; and a highly endowed being will always feel that any happiness which he can look for, as the world is constituted, is imperfect.

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