Job the Silent: A Study in Historical Counterpoint

Predný obal
Oxford University Press, 23. 7. 1998 - 304 strán (strany)
Offering an original reading of the book of Job, one of the great literary classics of biblical literature, this book develops a new analogical method for understanding how biblical texts evolve in the process of transmission. Zuckerman argues that the book of Job was intended as a parody protesting the stereotype of the traditional righteous sufferer as patient and silent. He compares the book of Job and its fate to that of a famous Yiddish short story, "Bontsye Shvayg," another covert parody whose protagonist has come to be revered as a paradigm of innocent Jewish suffering. Zuckerman uses the story to prove how a literary text becomes separated from the intention of its author, and takes on quite a different meaning for a specific community of readers.

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Obsah

Introduction
3
The Patience Problem
13
The Case against a Linear Reading
25
SuperJob
34
SuperReality
59
The Sincerely Wrong Approach
77
Barriers to Interpretation
87
The DialogueAppeal
93
The Legal Metaphor
104
The Death Theme
118
The Joban Fugue
175
The Text and Translation of Y L Perets
181
Index of Authors
283
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Populárne pasáže

Strana 60 - I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command...
Strana 126 - Here we may reign secure, and in my choice To reign is worth ambition though in hell: Better to reign in hell, than serve in heaven.
Strana 257 - Fury said to a mouse, That he met in the house, 'Let us both go to law: / will prosecute you. - Come, I'll take no denial; We must have a trial: For really this morning I've nothing to do.
Strana 28 - Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan came also among them. And the Lord said unto Satan, Whence comest thou? Then Satan answered the Lord, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it.
Strana 60 - Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed : And on the pedestal these words appear : 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair !
Strana 28 - And the LORD said unto Satan, From whence comest thou ? And Satan answered the LORD, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it.
Strana 109 - Hammurabi, the exalted prince, the worshiper of the gods, to cause justice to prevail in the land, to destroy the wicked and the evil, • to prevent the strong from oppressing the weak, to go forth like the Sun over the Black Head Race, to enlighten the land and to further the welfare of the people.
Strana 28 - And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil...
Strana 19 - Do not lay your hand on the boy or do anything to him; for now I know that you fear God, since you have not withheld your son, your only son, from me.

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