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Juvenalia Oreime. Janine Latin,

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DECIMI JUNII JUVENALIS

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SATIRAE XIII

THIRTEEN SATIRES OF JUVENAL

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WITH NOTES AND INTRODUCTION

BY

G. A. SIMCOX, M.A.

FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE OXFORD

SECOND EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED

JOHN ALLYN
BROMFIELD STREET, BOSTON

1873

A a 1873c

GIFT OF

Honold wherler

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In the first edition I confined myself almost exclu-
śively to such annotations as a reader of Juvenal's
own day might have required, if very stupid and not
very ignorant. Even from this point of view the
commentary should have been fuller than it was then,
perhaps than it is now. In the present edition I have
tried to give just enough information about the proper
names mentioned in Juvenal (when anything is known)
to save beginners the trouble of a search in Dr Smith's
valuable dictionaries, which every schoolboy can hardly
be expected to possess, though they ought to be in
every school library. It was beyond both my ambition
and my power to add anything to the illustrative
materials which have been accumulated already. For-
tunately it lay more within the scope of the Catena
Classicorum to try to disengage the exegetical results
on which Mr Mayor's magnificent series of parallel
passages seem to converge.

His edition would leave no room for mine if schoolboys and undergraduates liked their work well enough to linger over it. The personal and subjective character of Mr Macleane's edition seems at first obtrusive; in tine his manliness becomes attractive; at last his independence becomes suggestive. Second thoughts have convinced me that he 968301

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vi PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION,

was right in more than one passage, especially on questions of punctuation where in the first instance I had followed Mayor. Wherever the text was simply a matter of manuscript authority, I have been glad to give Jahn's without discussion; where the various readings affected the sense or had a character of their own, it seemed better to choose for myself and to give my reasons: there is always something irritating about an edition which indicates a variety of reading without giving a clue to the editor's principle of selection.

Juvenal is a writer in whom every attentive reader may hope to discover something fresh, while every reader whose vigilance has not been chastened into sagacity must expect sometimes to discover more than is there; but in dealing with Juvenal it is safest to err on the side of

excess. In a highly literary age artificial connexions and effects occur more readily than natural; a writer can hardly employ an expression which does not imply a train of half-forgotten thought. The chronology of Juvenal's life and writings suggested in the Introduction, which has been materially expanded, is of course very precarious; but it seems to rest upon facts which have still to find their place in a really adequate conception of his system of satirical allusion.

Three satires have been altogether omitted as not required in University Examinations, which proceed on the creditable hypothesis that all candidates for a pass or honours either possess or cultivate the temper to which such reading is as painful as it ought to be.

INTRODUCTION.

ABOUT the life of Juvenal only three things can be said to be known;—that he was the heir of a wealtžy freedman; that he practised declamation till middle Kfe, when he fonnd out his talent for declamatory satire; and, lastly; that he was bañished to a frontier command, as a punishment for affronting an actor. Cf. vir. 88–92.

It is more than probable, from the Fifteenth Satire, that Egypt was the scene of his banishment, in which case the Scotti, mentioned in the fifth and sixth of the seven lives, printed by Jahn, must either be a copyist's blunder, founded on Coptos, or a false inference from xiv. 193. Some have conjectured, from the great variety of emperors specified as having sacrificed the poet to the vanity of a discreditable favourite, that the whole story is a fiction, based on the satirical allusion to Paris, in the Seventh Satire, and the expressions in the Fifteenth, which imply a personal acquaintance with Egypt. This is supported by the observation, that Paris was put to death by Domitian, A. D. 83, while no Junius was consul till A. D. 84. We have no right to reject the story of the exile, supported as it is by Sidonius Apollinaris, who refers to it (1x. 266) as the established belief of the fifth century; and the chronological difficulty about its cause may perhaps be removed by observing, that all the lives but one treat the emperor as the offended party, and that three state expressly that it was only on their republication that the lines on Paris

gave offence. Domitian was quite capable of resent

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