A Review of the Governments of Sparta and Athens

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W. Bulmer and Company, 1794 - 282 strán (strany)
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Strana 190 - Prima cadunt : ita verborum vetus interit aetas, Et juvenum ritu florent modo nata vigentque. Debemur morti nos nostraque ; sive receptus Terra Neptunus classes aquilonibus arcet, Regis opus ; sterilisve diu palus, aptaque remis, Vicinas urbes alit, et grave sentit aratrum ; Seu cursum mutavit iniquum frugibus amnis, Doctus iter melius ; mortalia facta peribunt : Nedum sermonum stet honos, et gratia vivax.
Strana 273 - ... than it can of any body else : he may indeed annex such conditions to the land, he enjoyed as a subject of any commonwealth, as may oblige his son to be of that community, if he will enjoy those possessions which were his father's ; because that estate being his father's property, he may dispose, or settle it, as he pleases.
Strana 273 - It is true that whatever engagements or promises any one has made for himself, he is under the obligation of them, but cannot by any compact whatsoever bind his children or posterity. For his son, when a man, being altogether as free as the father, any act of the father can no more give away the liberty of the son than it can of anybody else.
Strana 272 - This has been the practice of the world from its first beginning to this day; nor is it now any more hindrance to the freedom of mankind, that they are born under constituted and ancient polities, that have established laws, and set forms of government, than if they were born in the woods, amongst the unconfined inhabitants, that run loose in them: for those, who would persuade us, that by being born under any government, we are naturally subjects to it...
Strana 272 - For those who would persuade us that by being born under any government we are naturally subjects to it, and have no more any title or pretence to the freedom of the state of Nature, have no other reason (bating that of paternal power, which we have already answered) to produce for it, but only because our fathers or progenitors passed away their natural liberty, and thereby bound up themselves and their posterity to a perpetual subjection to the government which they themselves submitted to.
Strana 273 - ... to the freedom of the state of nature, have no other reason (bating that of paternal power, which we have already answered) to produce for it, but only because our fathers or progenitors passed away their natural liberty, and thereby bound up themselves and their posterity to a perpetual subjection to the government which they themselves submitted to. It is true that whatever...
Strana 267 - ... end of the sixth century: they were fondly cherished by the warm imagination of the Greeks and Asiatics : the Pantheon and Vatican were adorned with the emblems of a new superstition; but this semblance of idolatry was more coldly entertained by the rude barbarians and the Arian clergy of the West. The bolder forms of sculpture, in brass or marble, which peopled the temples of antiquity, were offensive to the fancy or conscience of the Christian Greeks; and a smooth surface of...
Strana 49 - Who, that looks upon the checkered scene of life, can fail to remark on each woe-worn visage, the traces left by care-creating avarice. It is this which multiplies grief in the cottage — it is this which imbitters disappointment in the palace. What is that which dries up the tears of filial sorrow: which dissolves the bonds of friendship; and which, while it occupies the sordid heart, shuts out compassion, and leaves no room for mercy? It is gold — that false semblance of happiness — that ideal...
Strana 178 - Law in general is human reason insofar as it governs all the peoples of the earth; and the political and civil laws of each nation should be only the particular cases to which human reason is applied.
Strana 178 - Would it not be extremely difficult to apply to Spain the Code of political, civil and religious liberty of England? It would be even more difficult to adapt to Venezuela the laws of North America. Does not the Spirit of Laws state that they must be suited to the people for whom they are made; that it is a great coincidence when the laws of one nation suit another; that laws must bear relation to the physical features of a country, its climate, its soil, its situation, extension and manner of living...

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