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and at last, sirrah, it should swim in good claret. I think I have made it out.

Footman. [To Ld. Smart.] My lord, Sir John Linger is coming up.

Ld. Smart. God so! I invited him to dine with me to-day, and forgot it: well, desire him to walk in.

Sir John Linger comes in. Sir John. What! you are at it! why, then, I'll be gone.

Lady Smart. Sir John, I beg you will sit down; come, the more the merrier.

Sir John. Ay; but the fewer the better cheer.

Lady Smart. Well, I am the worst in the world at making apologies; it was my lord's fault: I doubt you must kiss the hare's foot.

Sir John. I see you are fast by the teeth.
Col. Faith, Sir John, we are killing that that would

kill us.

Ld. Sparkish. You see, Sir John, we are upon a business of life and death ; come, will you do as we do? you are come in pudding-time.

Sir John. Ay; this would be doing if I were dead. What! you keep court hours, I see: I'll be going, and get a bit of meat at my inn.

Lady Smart. Why, we won't eat you, Sir John.

Sir John. It is my own fault; but I was kept by a fellow, who bought some Derbyshire oxen of me.

Neverout. You see, Sir John, we staid for you as one horse does for another.

Lady Smart. My lord, will you help Sir John to some beef ? Lady Answerall, pray eat, you see your dinner ; I am sure, if we had known we should have such good company, we should have been better provided; but you must take the will for the deed. I'm afraid you are invited to your loss. .

Col. And pray, Sir John, how do you like the town? you have been absent a long time.

Sir John. Why, I find little London stands just where it did when I left it last.

Neverout. What do you think of Hanover-square ? Why, Sir John, London is gone out of town since

you

saw it.

you.

Lady Smart. Sir John, I can only say, you are heartily welcome; and I wish I had something better for

Col. Here's no salt; cuckolds will run away with the meat.

Lady Smart. Pray edge a little, to make more room for Sir John : Sir John, fall to : you know, half an hour is soon lost at dinner.

Sir John. I protest, I can't eat a bit, for I took share of a beefsteak and two mugs of ale with my chapman, besides a tankard of March beer, as soon as I got out of

my bed.

Lady Answ. Not fresh and fasting, I hope ?

Sir John. Yes, faith, madam ; I always wash my kettle before I put the meat in it.

Lady Smart. Poh! Sir John, you have seen nine houses since you eat last : come, you have kept a corner in your stomach for a piece of venison pasty.

Sir John. Well, I'll try what I can do when it comes up.

Lady Answ. Come, Sir John, you may go farther and fare worse.

Miss. [To Neverout.] Pray, Mr Neverout, will you please to send me a piece of tongue ?

1

and at last, sirrah, it should swim in good claret. I think I have made it out.

Footman. [To Ld. Smart.] My lord, Sir John Linger is coming up.

Ld. Smart. God so! I invited him to dine with me to-day, and forgot it : well, desire him to walk in.

Sir John Linger comes in. Sir John. What! you are at it! why, then, I'll be gone.

Lady Smart. Sir John, I beg you will sit down ; come, the more the merrier.

Sir John. Ay; but the fewer the better cheer.

Lady Smart. Well, I am the worst in the world at making apologies; it was my lord's fault: I doubt you must kiss the hare's foot.

Sir John. I see you are fast by the teeth.

Col. Faith, Sir John, we are killing that that would kill us.

Ld. Sparkish. You see, Sir John, we are upon a business of life and death ; come, will you do as we do? you are come in pudding-time.

Sir John. Ay; this would be doing if I were dead. What! you keep court hours, I see: I'll be going, and get a bit of meat at my inn.

Lady Smart. Why, we won't eat you, Sir John.

Sir John. It is my own fault; but I was kept by a fellow, who bought some Derbyshire oxen of me.

Neverout. You see, Sir John, we staid for you as one horse does for another.

Lady Smart. My lord, will you help Sir John to some beef ? Lady Answerall, pray eat, you see your

dinner

; I am sure, if we had known we should have such good

company, we should have been better provided; but you must take the will for the deed. I'm afraid

you are invited to your loss.

Col. And pray, Sir John, how do you like the town? you have been absent a long time.

Sir John. Why, I find little London stands just where it did when I left it last.

Neverout. What do you think of Hanover-square? Why, Sir John, London is gone out of town since you

saw it.

Lady Smart. Sir John, I can only say, you are heartily welcome; and I wish I had something better for you.

Col. Here's no salt; cuckolds will run away with the meat.

Lady Smart. Pray edge a little, to make more room for Sir John : Sir John, fall to : you know, half an hour is soon lost at dinner.

Sir John. I protest, I can't eat a bit, for I took share of a beefsteak and two mugs of ale with my chapman, besides a tankard of March beer, as soon as I got out of

my bed.

Lady Answ. Not fresh and fasting, I hope ?

Sir John. Yes, faith, madam ; I always wash my kettle before I put the meat in it.

Lady Smart. Poh! Sir John, you have seen nine houses since you eat last : come, you have kept a corner in

your stomach for a piece of venison pasty.

Sir John. Well, I'll try what I can do when it comes up.

Lady Answ. Come, Sir John, you may go farther and fare worse.

Miss. [To Neverout.] Pray, Mr Neverout, will you please to send me a piece of tongue ?

Miss. Why, this finger: no, 'tis this: I vow I can't find which it is. :

Neverout. Ay; the fox had a wound, and he could not tell where, &c. Bring some water to throw in her face.

Miss. Pray, Mr Neverout, did you ever draw a sword in anger ? I warrant, you would faint at the sight of

your own blood.

Lady Smart. Mr Neverout, shall I send you some veal ?

Neverout. No, madam ; I don't love it.

Miss. Then pray for them that do. I desire your ladyship will send me a bit.

Ld. Smart. Tom, my service to you.

Neverout. My lord, this moment I did myself the honour to drink to your lordship.

Ld. Smart. Why, then, that's Hertfordshire kind

ness.*

Neverout. Faith, my lord, I pledged myself; for I drank twice together without thinking.

Ld. Sparkish. Why, then, colonel, my humble ser

vice to you.

Neverout. Pray, my lord, don't make a bridge of my

nose.

Ld. Sparkish. Well, a glass of this wine is as comfortable as matrimony to an old woman.

e.

* “ That is, any one drinking back to his right-hand man; i. the person who immediately before drank to him ; perhaps a method practised by some persons of this county. Fuller says, this adage is meant to express a return for a favour or benefit conferred. It rather seems to mean returning a favour at the expense of others, as, by this inversion in the circulation of the glass, some of the company are deprived of their turn.”—GROSE ut supra, sign. N. 4.

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