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prayer in regard to it, is, that it may be the means of doing some good: my next, that it may be received by those whom I have so much reason to respect and love, as a well intended effort to benefit the Church of God.

I am aware that some of my Brethren do not concur with me in maintaining the Divine au · thority of the office of the Ruling Elder; and, probably, in several other opinions respecting this office advanced in the following pages. In reference to these points, I can only say, that, as the original publication, of which this is an enlargement, was made without the remotest thought of controversy, and even without adverting, in my own mind, to the fact, that I differed materially froin any

Brethren, so nothing is more foreign from my wishes, in the republication, than to assail the opinions or feelings of any Brother. I have carefully reexamined the whole subject And, although, in doing this, I have been led to modify some of my former opinions, in relation to a few minor points ; yet in reference to the Divine warrant and the great importance of the Office for which I plead, my convictions have become stronger than ever. The following sheets exhịbit those views, and that testimony in support

of my

V.

of them, which at present, satisfy my own mind, and which I feel confident may be firmly sustained. How far, however, the considerations which have satisfied me, may impress more impartial judges, I cannot venture to foretel. All that I dare to ask in their behalf is, that they may be seriously and candidly weighed.

But there is one point in regard to which I anticipate no diversity of opinion. If the statement given in the following Essay, concerning the duties incumbent on Ruling Elders, be correct, it is certain that very inadequate views of those duties, have been too often · taken, both by those who conferred, and those who sustained the office; and that there is a manifest and loud call for an attempt to raise the standard of public sentiment in reference to the whole subject. That we make so little of this Office, compared with what we might do, and ought to do, does really appear to me one of the deepest deficiencies of our beloved Church. That a reform in this respect is desirable, is to express but half the truth It is necessary; it is vital. It has pleased the sovereign Disposer, to cast our lot in a period of mighty plans, and of high moral effort, for the benefit of the world. In the subject of this volume, I am inclined to think, is wrapped up ONE of those means which are destined, under His blessing, to be richly productive of moral energy in the enterprises of Christian benevolence, which appear to be every day gathering strength. When the Rulers of the Church shall, in the genuine spirit of the humble, faithful and laborious Paul, “magnify their office;" when they shall be found cordially and diligently co-operating with those who “ labor in the word and doctrine," in inspecting, counselling and watching over the “flocks” respectively committed to their “oversight in the Lord;" and when they shall be suitably honored and employed, in their various appropriate functions, both by Pastors and People; this change will, I believe, be, at once, one of the surest precursors, and one of the most efficient means, of the introduction of brighter days in the Church of God.

So far as we can anticipate events, this important change must begin with the Teachers and Rulers of the Church themselves. On every one of you, therefore, if my estimate of the subject be correct, devolves a high and most interesting responsibility. That you may have grace given you to acquit yourselves of this

responsibility, in a manner acceptable to our
common Master, and conducive to the signal
advancement of his kingdom ; and that future
generations, both in the Church and out of it,
may have reason to "rise up and call you
blessed,” is the fervent prayer of,
Reverend and Respected Brethren,

Your friend and fellow-servant
in the house of God,

SAMUEL MILLER.
Princeton,
April 20, 1831.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

Introductory Remarks-Nature of the Church-Visible
and Invisible Church-Unity of the Church-A form of gov-
ernment for the Church appointed by Christ-Nature and
limits of ecclesiastical power-Summary of the doctrine of
Presbyterians on this subject- The proper classes of officers
in a Church completely organized-Positions intended to be
established, as affording a warrant for the office of Ruling
Elders.-page 12-30.

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CHAPTER IV.

Testimony of the Christian Fathers--Clemens Romanus-1g-
natiusPolycarp-Cyprian-Origen--Gesta Purgationis, &c.,

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