Obrázky na stránke
PDF
ePub

THE

SAPPHIC ODES OF HORACE,

TRANSLATED

INTO NEARLY

CORRESPONDING ENGLISH VERSE.

(WITH THE ORIGINAL TEXT.)

BY THE

REV. JOHN PEAT, M.A.

OF ST. PETER'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

“ Here happy Horace tuned the Ausonian lyre

To sweeter sounds, and temper'd Pindar's fire :
Pleased with Alcæus' manly rage to infuse
The softer spirit of the Sapphic muse.”

Pope,

LONDON:
FRANCIS & JOHN RIVINGTON,
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD, AND WATERLOO PLACE.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,

ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.

TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE

WILLIAM PITT,

EARL AMHERST, G.C.H. D.C.L.

&c. &c.

These Translations

(SOME OF WHICH WERE MADE DURING HEALTH-SEEKING

RAMBLES IN KNOLE PARK)

ARE, BY HIS LORDSHIP'S PERMISSION,

MOST RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED.

PREFACE.

THE

prose translation of the works of Horace by Christopher Smart, and that in verse by Dr. Francis, are both faithful and good ; and it is not the aim of the writer of the following pages to interfere with the standard authority of those translations.

It long ago occurred to him that if the Odes were translated into verse corresponding (as nearly as circumstances would allow) with the originals, the reader would be more struck, than at present, with the spirit of the compositions. Thus, for instance, the first Sapphic Ode of Horace (Ode 2, Lib. I.) is translated by Dr. Francis into English Heroic verse; and though the translation is accomplished with great talent and spirit, yet-such is the difference of the styles—the mind of the reader is not vividly impressed with the identity of the two compositions.

In translating the Sapphic Odes into nearly corresponding English verse, the writer wishes not, of course, to allude to the manner in which the task has been accomplished, but merely to the plan of the under

« PredošláPokračovať »