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Probable origin of the Satire, (1 S. vш.) Proscripti Regis
On the succession of the pieces in his books; the separation of

some, the conjunction of others

Canidia traced through all the pieces respecting her

The new stage of Horace's history, when just possessed of the
Sabine estate. 2 S. vi. Hoc erat in votis

Epistles

Publication of the fourth book of Odes

ib.

(Lays the foundation of his Epodes)

66

His happiness and kind reception among his Sabine neighbours . 67 The historical bearing of his Epodes considered

69

Progress from the Epodes to the Odes, from the Odes to the

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Preceded by the Carmen Sæculare.

And marked by peculiar circumstances.

In that book no direct address to Maecenas, and why

Mæcenas Horace's only patron

Horace's temper and disposition, that of contentedness and

BRIEF CHRONOLOGY OF THE Life and WRITINGS OF HORACE

APPENDIX.

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VI. On Horace's obligations to the Greek poets
VII. On Kirchner's QUESTIONES HORATIANÆ

gratitude

By no means without a sense of religion Mæcenas's visit to Horace at Tivoli

Chronological table, in its several particulars, explained

Dates regarding Virgil, Quintilius Varus, and Lucilius, considered 83
In historical facts no real objection to Bentley's chronology
The localities of Horace, as here stated, not affected by the sup-
posed discovery of the Fons Bandusinus near Venusia

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I. Horace's familiar day, and Roman customs connected with
it

II. On the Sabine Valley and the second Epode

III. On Mæcenas and the first Ode of the first book

Page

61

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62

64

ib.

72

73

74

ib.

76

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77

78

79

80

85

95

107

111

IV. On Augustus Cæsar and the second Ode, Jam satis terris 121 V. De Personis Horatianis

128

139

140

87

90

VIII. Some account of the text of this edition, and of the readings different from that of Gesner adopted for its improvement

TREATISE ON THE METRES OF HORACE

INTRODUCTION.

The terms Caupona-Popina-Taberna, explained
No places of reception for a party to dine

Horace's olus omne illustrated

His peculiar nicety as to good water

On the Comites of Horace's day, and the military origin of that character

Page

149

159

xiii

xiv

ib.

ib.

ib.

DISSERTATION

ON

THE CHRONOLOGY OF THE WORKS,

AND ON

THE LOCALITIES

AND LIFE AND CHARACTER

OF

HORACE.

HAVING now, for more than one third of a century, been engaged in reading the works of Horace with my Pupils, and having long witnessed in his commentators the confusion very often attending their neglect of his chronology, (let me add of his localities also,) I have been strongly inclined for some time past to undertake the illustration of Horace, in that department alone. By the light of Bentley's discoveries in his celebrated Præfatio, the question De temporibus librorum Horatii (though the result only of his investigations without any part of the regular process is given) I ventured to consider after all as in the main decisively settled. And therefore if on the strength of Bentley's name I had proceeded to publish a new edition of the works, without any other recommendation than that of their being printed in the very order in which they were originally published in successive books by the author himself;

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it struck my mind very forcibly, that such an edition would be hailed by Scholars as an era in Horatian literature.

That design, however, still hung in suspense, and might yet have been indefinitely delayed. But in the course of last year, (1831,) I was led to expect the appearance of a Second Part of the Fasti Hellenici, &c., by Mr. H. Fynes Clinton, brought down to the death of Augustus: and that expectation inspired me with a strong anxiety to learn what the Master Chronologist had done, under the head of Roman Authors, towards fixing or correcting the calculations of Bentley. My satisfaction of course was very great to find, that all the principal points which had been laid down one hundred and twenty years ago for the foundation of that arrangement, may now be received as determined once for all by the very highest authority.

Mr. Clinton himself on being informed of my intention gives me the kindest encouragement to persevere: he approves of my undertaking so useful a work as an edition of the books of Horace, arranged in chronological order: and he assigns as a reason for his approbation, that the neglect of that order has produced much perplexity to the student not of Horace only, but of many other authors of the Augustan age.

Under all these circumstances, I now am emboldened to proceed in the task; and as the design in the first instance is submitted to the judgement of scholars, which it candidly invites, I shall at once lay before them as preliminary to all other disquisition the following extract from Bentley's Præfatio. The title is copied from the formula adopted by Gesner, who in his edition of Horace gives all this extract except what stands as the first section of it: and the division here made of the whole into parts commodious for reference, will on that account be readily allowed.

DE TEMPORIBUS LIBRORUM

HORATII

ET

POEMATUM ADEO

RICH. BENTLEII SENTENTIA.

1. JAM vero et illud monendum est, editiones principes et recentioris ætatis codices alio ac nunc solemus ordine Artem Poëticam collocare, post carmen nempe Sæculare ante Sermones et Epistolas: vetustiores vero omnes Membranas post Carminum libros Artem Epodis præponere. Si quæris, quisnam ex his ordo recte se habeat, seriemque temporum, quibus singula ab auctore edita sunt, rite conservet, vetustusne ille an medius an hodiernus; nullus profecto omnium.

2. Magno quidem studio et acerrima contentione post Tanaquilli Fabri operam Clarissimi viri Dacerius Massonusque in hanc arenam descenderunt; quorum equidem acumen et eruditionem in partibus laudo; in operis vero summa totoque constituendo rem eos infeliciter admodum gessisse censeo. Horum enim rationibus, et Carminibus et Epodis et Sermonibus Epistolisque scribendis uno ac eodem tempore vacavisse Nostrum necesse est; et singula quæque poëmatia separatim in vulgus edidisse: quorum utrumque a vero alienum esse mihi pro comperto est.

3. Quippe omnibus, qui ejusmodi Poëmatia scripserunt, id in more erat, ut non sparsas Eclogas, sed integros Libellos semel simulque in lucem ederent. Ita Catullus fecit, ut ex Epigrammate 1. constat, Cui dono lepidum novum LIBELLUM: ita Tibullus, quem vide Elegia 1. libri tertii, v. 7. et 17. ita Propertius Eleg. 1. librorum 11. 111. et IV. ut et Libri 11. Elegia x, v. 25. et XIX, v. 39; ita Virgilius

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