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II. “Oh! never,” she cried, “ could I think of enshrining

“ An image, whose looks are so joyless and dim; “But yon little god, upon roses reclining,

We'll make, if you please, Sir, a Friendship of him."

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So the bargain was struck; with the little god laden

She joyfully flew to her shrine in the grove : “ Farewell,” said the sculptor, “ you're not the first

maiden Who came but for Friendship and took away Love."

FLOW ON, THOU SHINING RIVER.

Portuguese Air.

I.

Flow on, thou shining river;

But, ere thou reach the sea,
Seek Ella's bower, and give her

The wreaths I fling o'er thee.
And tell her thus, if she'll be mine,

The current of our lives shall be,
With joys along their course to shine,

Like those sweet flowers on thee.

II.

But if, in wandering thither,

Thou find'st she mocks my prayer, Then leave those wreaths to wither

Upon the cold bank there. And tell her thus, when youth is o'er,

Her lone and loveless charms shall be Thrown by upon life's weedy shore,

Like those sweet flowers from thee.

ALL THAT'S BRIGHT MUST FADE.

Indian Air.

I.
ALL that's bright must fade,

The brightest still the fleetest;
All that's sweet was made,

But to be lost when sweetest.
Stars that shine and fall;-

The flower that drops in springing ;These, alas! are types of all

To which our hearts are clinging.

230

All that's bright must fade,–

The brightest still the fleetest ;
All that's sweet was made

But to be lost when sweetest !

So warm

That

That fir

Or th

To mee

II.
Who would seek or prize

Delights that end in aching?
Who would trust to ties

That every hour are breaking?
Better far to be

In utter darkness lying,
Than be bless'd with light and see

That light for ever flying.
All that's bright must fadė,-

The brightest still the fleetest ;
All that's sweet was made

But to be lost when sweetest !

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SO WARMLY WE MET.

Hungarian Air

1.

So warmly we met and so fondly we parted,

That which was the sweeter even I could not tell That first look of welcome her sunny eyes darted,

Or that tear of passion which bless’d our farewell. To meet was a heaven, and to part thus another,

Our joy and our sorrow seem'd rivals in bliss ; Oh! Cupid's two eyes are not liker each other

In smiles and in tears, than that moment to this.

II. The first was like day-break-new, sudden, delicious,

The dawn of a pleasure scarce kindled up yet-The last was that farewell of daylight, more precious,

More glowing and deep, as 'tis nearer its set. Our meeting, though happy, was tinged by a sorrow

To think that such happiness could not remain While our parting, though sad, gave a hope that to

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morrow

Would bring back the bless'd hour of meeting again.

THOSE EVENING BELLS.

AIR.-The Bells of St. Petersburgh.

1.
THOSE evening bells! those evening bells!
How many a tale their music tells,
Of youth, and home, and that sweet time,
When last I heard their soothing chime!

II.
Those joyous hours are past away!
And many a heart, that then was gay,
Within the tomb now darkly dwells,
And hears no more those evening bells!

III. And so 'twill be when I am gone; That tuneful peal will still ring on, While other bards shall walk these dells, And sing your praise, sweet evening bells !

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