History in English Words

Predný obal
SteinerBooks, 1967 - 240 strán (strany)

For more than three-quarters of a century, Owen Barfield produced original and thought-provoking works that made him a legendary cult figure. History in English Words is his classic excursion into history through the English language. This popular book provides a brief, brilliant history of the various peoples who have spoken the Indo-European tongues. It is illustrated throughout by current English words whose derivation from other languages, and whose history in use and changes of meaning, record and unlock the larger history.

"In our language alone, not to speak of its many companions, the past history of humanity is spread out in an imperishable map, just as the history of the mineral earth lies embedded in the layers of its outer crust.... Language has preserved for us the inner, living history of our soul. It reveals the evolution of consciousness" --Owen Barfield

CONTENTS:

The English Nation:
∞ Philogy and the Aryans
∞ The Settlement and Europe
∞ England before the Reformation
∞ Modern England

The Western Outlook:
∞ Myth
∞ Philosophy and Religion
∞ Devotion
∞ Experiment
∞ Personality and Reason
∞ Mechanism
∞ Imagination

Afterword
Index

Vyhľadávanie v obsahu knihy

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Obsah

THE ENGLISH NATION
13
Philogy and the Aryans
15
The Settlement and Europe
32
England before the Reformation
48
Modern England
64
PART II
83
Myth
85
Philosophy and Religion
100
Devotion
123
Experiment
144
Personality and Reason
161
Mechanism
183
Imagination
201
Afterword
221
Index
225
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Populárne pasáže

Strana 204 - Only the poet, disdaining to be tied to any such subjection, lifted up with the vigor of his own invention, doth grow in effect into another Nature, in making things either better than Nature bringeth forth, or, quite anew, forms such as never were in Nature...
Strana 20 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Strana 220 - fit audience let me find, though few ! " So prayed, more gaining than he asked, the Bard In holiest mood. Urania, I shall need Thy guidance, or a greater Muse, if such Descend to earth or dwell in highest heaven ! For I must tread on shadowy ground, must sink Deep, and, aloft ascending, breathe in worlds To which the heaven of heavens is but a veil. All strength, all terror, single or in bands, That ever was put forth in personal form — Jehovah, with his thunder, and the choir Of shouting Angels,...
Strana 34 - And snatch'd his rudder, and shook out more sail, And day and night held on indignantly O'er the blue Midland waters with the gale, Betwixt the Syrtes and soft Sicily To where the Atlantic raves Outside the Western Straits...
Strana 123 - The freedom of women produced the poetry of sexual love. Love became a religion, the idols of whose worship were ever present. It was as if the statues of Apollo and the Muses had been endowed with life and motion, and had walked forth among their worshippers; so that earth became peopled by the inhabitants of a diviner world. The familiar appearance and proceedings of life became wonderful and heavenly, and a paradise was created as out of the wrecks of Eden.
Strana 127 - He came all so still There his mother was, As dew in April That falleth on the grass. He came all so still To his mother's bower, As dew in April That falleth on the flower. He came all so still There his mother lay, As dew in April That falleth on the spray.
Strana 206 - For these third be they which most properly do imitate to teach and delight; and to imitate, borrow nothing of what is, hath been, or shall be; but range, only reined with learned discretion, into the divine consideration of what may be, and should be.
Strana 220 - The darkest pit of lowest Erebus, Nor aught of blinder vacancy, scooped out By help of dreams — can breed such fear and awe As fall upon us often when we look Into our Minds, into the Mind of Man — 4o My haunt, and the main region of my song.

O tomto autorovi (1967)

Owen Barfield (1898-1997), British philosopher and critic, has been called the "First and Last Inkling" because of his influential and enduring role in the group known as the Oxford Inklings, which included C.S. lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams. It was Barfield who first advanced the ideas about language, myth, and belief that became identified with the thought and art of the Inklings. The author of numerous books, his history of the evolution of human consciousness, Saving the Appearances: A Study in Idolatry, achieved a place in the list of the '100 Best Spiritual Books of the Century'.

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