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to refuse to believe an article of doctrine, which God has certainly taught, as it is to refuse to observe a moral duty, which God has certainly commanded. · But is not the mind of man as free as air ? If it is to be fixed, by what is it to be fixed but by the evidence of truth? In answer to this, I ask, is the mind more free than the will ? Is not the will of man subject to the supreme will and command of God? Though it be free, is it not under a moral obligation of obeying the divine command, which is a restriction on its liberty ? May notGod, who has a right to command the will to observe the moral precept, which he has given, have also a right to command the understanding to assent to the doctrine he has revealed? But can the mind reasonably assent to a doctrine without evidence of its truth? Certainly not; without either intrinsic evidence, if the doctrine be the object of intrinsic ; or without extrinsic, if the doctrine be the object of extrinsic evidence. Thus the mind assents to the truth of mathematical doctrines, on the intrinsic evidence of mathematical demonstrations; it assents to the truth of historical assertions, on the extrinsic evidence of human testimony; it assents to the truth of revealed doctrines, on the extrinsic evidence of the testimony of God.

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THE CERTITUDE OF THE TRUTH OF THE REVEALED DOCTRINES - OF CHRISTIANITY CAN BE OBTAINED ONLY BY THE MEDIUM 7. OF EXTRINSIC EVIDENCE, OR BY THE TESTIMONY OF GOD,

GIVEN IN THE ACT OF THE DIVINE REVELATION OF THESE DOCTRINES. --Shewn from the nature of the question--from the

reasoning of St. Paulfrom the natural method of coming to - the true and certain knowledge of the will of a Legislator,

Ir bas been shewn that the certitude of the truth of the revealed doctrines of Christianity cannot be obtained by the medium of intrinsic evidence; it follow's, therefore, that it can be obtained only by extrinsic evidence, or by the evidence of the testimony of God. : ...,)? ::.. . sterone

The testimony of God must be, in the nature of things, the only proper medium of ascertaining the truth of these revealed doctrines; because these doctrines have for their objects, either the nature of God or the designs and works of God. To whom is the nature of God perfectly known, but to God himself? To whom are the designs and works of God perfectly known, but to God himself? God only has a perfect and comprehensive knowledge of his own nature, designs, and works; therefore, his manifestation or revelation of them is the proper medium by which the truth of them can be ascertained.

The eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither hath it entered into the heart of man, what things God hath prepared for them that love him. The knowledge of the designs and works of God in favour of man could never have been acquired, either by the testimony of the senses, or by the demonstrations of human reason. But to us God. HATH REVEALED them by his spirit. For the spirit of God searcheth all things, yea the deep things of God. No other can know liis designs or intentions, unless he manifest them. For what man knoweth the

to refuse to believe an article of doctrine, which God has certainly taught, as it is to refuse to observe a moral duty, which God has certainly commanded.

But is not the mind of man as free as air? If it is to be fixed, by what is it to be fixed but by the evidence of truth? In answer to this, I ask, is the mind more free than the will ? Is not the will of man subject to the supreme will and conimand of God? Though it be free, is it not under a moral obligation of obeying the divine command, which is a restriction on its liberty ? May not God, who has a right to command the will to observe the moral precept, which he has given, have also a right to command the understanding to assent to the doctrine he has revealed? But can the mind reasonably assent to a doctrine without evidence of its truth? Certainly not; without either intrinsic evidence, if the doctrine be the object of intrinsic ; or without extrinsic, if the doctrine be the object of extrinsic evidence. Thus the mind assents to the truth of mathematical doctrines, on the intrinsic evidence of mathematical demonstrations; it assents to the truth of historical assertions, on the extrinsic evidence of human testimony; it assents to the truth of revealed doctrines, on the extrinsic evidence of the testimony of God.

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THE CERTITUDE OF THE TRUTH OF THE REVEALED DOCTRINES - OF CHRISTIANITY CAN BE OBTAINED ONLY BY THE MEDIUM 1. OF EXTRINSIC EVIDENCE, OR BY THE TESTIMONY OF GOD, GIVEN IN THE ACT OF THE DIVINE REVELATION OF THESE DOCTRINES.-Shewn from the nature of the question-- from the reasoning of St. Paul-from the natural method of coming to the true and certain knowledge of the will of a Legislator. ,

Ir bas been shewn that the certitude of the truth of the revealed doctrines of Christianity cannot be obtained by the medium of intrinsic evidence; it follows, therefore, that it can be obtained only by extrinsic evidence, or by the evidence of the testimony of God. ? V .."".}? :;.

sti...! The testimony of God must be, in the nature of things, the only proper medium of ascertaining the truth of these revealed doctrines; because these doctrines have for their objects, either the nature of God or the designs and works of God. To whom is the nature of God perfectly known, but to God himself? To whom are the designs and works of God perfectly known, but to God himself? God only has a perfect and comprehensive knowledge of his own nature, designs, and works; therefore, his manifestation or revelation of them is the proper medium by which the truth of them can be ascertained.

The eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither hath it entered into the heart of man, what things God hath prepared for them that love him. The knowledge of the designs and works of God in favour of man could never have been acquired, either by the testimony of the senses, or by the demonstrations of human reason. But to us God HATH REVEALED them by his spirit. For the spirit of God searcheth all things, yea the deep things of God. No other can know his designs or intentions, unless he manifest them. For what man knoweth the things (the dispositions and intentions) of a man, but the spirit of man, that is in him? So the things, also (the will and designs), that are of God, no man knoweth but the spirit of God. Now we have received, not the spirit of this world, but the spirit that is of God; THAT WE MAY KNOW the things that are given us of God.—1 Cor. ii. 9, 10, 11, 12.

No knowledge can be more true than this, which God has of his own nature, designs, and works; because he knows them as they are in themselves. Nothing can be more certain to us than the truth of that which is revealed to us by the God of truth, concerning his nature, designs, and works. If we receive the testimony of men, the testimony of God is greater. 1 John, v. 9. The testimony of God is assuredly the most solid basis of the most absolute certitude of truth.

If, therefore, God, who perfectly knows himself, his own designs and works, positively declares that in his own infinitely perfect nature there are three distinct persons; that in Christ there are, since lris incarnation, two natures united in the person of God the Son; that the posterity of Adam are born in the guilt of original sin ; that atonement has been made for sin by the death of Christ on the cross; that baptism is instituted for the remission of sins; that every man will be judged immediately after his death; that Christ will come from heaven at the last day, to judge all men according to their works; that our bodies shall be raised to life; that the good will be rewarded with eternal bappiness, and the wicked punished with eternal torments : if God declares these things, they are most true and certain ; and this declaration or testimony of God is the proper medium by which the truth of these doctrines can be ascertained. i

The doctrines of Christianity are the law of Christ How is the knowledge of what a legislator freely commands, to be obtained, but by the declaration or manifestation which he himself makes of his will ?

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