View of the state of Europe during the Middle ages. 2 vols. [with] Supplemental notes

Predný obal
 

Čo hovoria ostatní - Napísať recenziu

Na obvyklých miestach sme nenašli žiadne recenzie.

Iné vydania - Zobraziť všetky

Časté výrazy a frázy

Populárne pasáže

Strana 140 - Charter and other the laws and statutes of this your realm, no man ought to be adjudged to death, but by the laws established in this your realm...
Strana 251 - ... by the law of the land ; it is accorded, assented, and established, that from henceforth none shall be taken by petition or suggestion made to our lord the king, or to his council, unless it be by indictment or presentment of good and lawful people of the same neighbourhood...
Strana 390 - There are, if I may so say, three powerful spirits which have from time to time moved over the face of the waters and given a predominant impulse to the moral sentiments and energies of mankind : these are the spirits of liberty, of religion and of honor. It was the principal business of chivalry to animate and cherish the last of these three...
Strana 350 - English gentry were lodged in stately or even in well-sized houses. Generally speaking, their dwellings were almost as inferior to those of their descendants in capacity, as they were in convenience. The usual arrangement consisted of an entrance-passage running through the house, with a hall on one side, a parlour beyond, and one or two chambers above, and on the opposite side, a kitchen, pantry and other offices.
Strana 352 - Suger, however, a century before, had adorned his great work, the Abbey of St Denis, with windows, not only glazed but painted ; and I presume that other churches of the same class, both in France and England, especially after the lancetshaped window had yielded to one of ampler dimensions, were generally decorated in a similar manner. Yet glass is said not to have been employed in the domestic architecture of France before the fourteenth century ; and its introduction into England was probably by...
Strana 3 - Moreover we have granted for us and our heirs, as well to archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, and other folk of holy Church, as also to earls, barons, and to all the commonalty of the land, that for no business from henceforth...
Strana 371 - There is one very unpleasing remark which every one who attends to the subject of prices will be induced to make, that the labouring classes, especially those engaged in agriculture, were better provided with the means of subsistence in the reign of Edward III. or of Henry VI. than they are at present. In the fourteenth century...
Strana 147 - ... commons, the acts of the legislature, the testimony of historians and lawyers, before we could assert that England acquiesced in those abuses and oppressions which it must be confessed she was unable fully to prevent. The word prerogative is of a peculiar import, and scarcely understood by those who come from the studies of political philosophy. We cannot define it by any theory of executive functions. All these may be comprehended in it; but also a great deal more. It is best, perhaps, to be...
Strana 292 - A continual intercourse was kept up, in consequence of the first, between Rome and the several nations of Europe; her laws were received by the bishops, her legates presided in councils: so that a common language was as necessary in the Church as it is at present in the diplomatic relations of kingdoms. 2. Throughout the whole course of the Middle Ages there was no learning, and very little regularity of manners, among the parochial clergy. Almost every distinguished man was either the member of...
Strana 309 - Romans. With the northern invaders, however, it was rather a predominant appetite than an amusement ; it was their pride and their ornament, the theme of their songs, the object of their laws, and the business of their lives. Falconry, unknown as a diversion to the ancients, became from the fourth century an equally delightful occupation...

Bibliografické informácie