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B.C. 1490.

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Nature of purity of heart.— I would have you attend to the full significance and extent of the term “ holy." It is not abstinence

“The chaste from outward deeds of profligacy alone—it is not a mere recoil mind, from impurity in thought. It is that quick and sensitive polished plane, delicacy to which even the very conception of evil is offensive ; may admit foul it is a virtue which has its residence within, which takes thoughts withguardianship of the heart, as of a citadel or inviolated sanctuary, their tincture."in which no wrong or worthless imagination is permitted to Sterne. dwell. It is not purity of action that we contend for ; it is " The heart of a exalted purity of heart-the ethereal purity of the third heaven ;

wise man should and if it is at once settled in the heart, it brings the peace, the

ror, which retriumph, and the untroubled serenity of heaven along with it-I flects every obhad almost said, the pride of a great moral victory over the ject without infirmities of an earthly and accursed nature : there is a health being sullied by

any."-Confucius. and harmony in the soul; a beauty which, though it effloresces in the countenance, and the outward path, is itself so thoroughly feminine, truth

“Purity is the internal, as to make purity of heart the most distinctive evidence the masculine, of of a work of grace in time, the most distinctive guidance of a honour."Harc. character that is ripening and expanding for the glories of n Chalmers. eternity.

10-13. (10) if.. flocks,a etc., circumstances of offerer con- place of sulted : he who could not afford a bullock might bring a sheep killing the or goat. bring .. blemish, whatever was brought must be

a Is. liii. 7. perfect of its kind. (11) northward, the appointed place, a 6 See Bush. * not eastward, as the heathen sacrifices." (12, 13) See vv. 8, 9. c Mal. 1. 14; Jo.

The offering without blemish (v. 10).—1. To teach self-denial vi. 37. in matters of religion ; the best reserved for holy uses. II. To

d Le: iv. 24, 29,

33, vii. 2. produce feelings of profound reverence for the holiness of God.

e Trapp. If the offering, how much more the offerer to be without blemish. "The III. To lead the thoughts onward to the Perfect Sacrifice.

expositors Symbolic meaning of the north.The north, in Scripture, seems sacrifice was connected with such of the governmental attributes of God as killed the are especially adverse to the dark vapours and corruptions of southward of the earth. Thence He sends forth that clear and purifying wind

was pol

(Maimonbefore which clouds and misty vapours disperse so as for the ides), and they light of heaven to shine in its clear, searching power—a power say that the north welcome to that which can bear inquisition and delight in is the symbol of being made manifest, but terrible to everything besides. Of the in Jer. i. 14, out north it is said : “And now men see not the bright light which of the north an is in the clouds : but the wind passeth, and cleanseth them. Fair evil shall break (golden) weather cometh out of the north : with God is excellent forth;' and that,

these majesty” (Job xxxvii. 21, 22). And again, "The north wind sacrifices driveth away rain” (Pr. xxv. 23). When Ezekiel was commis- offered to avert sioned to testify against the dark corruptions of Israel, and evil

,

they were killed beheld the glory of God in contrast therewith, “Behold, a whirl- northward of the wind came out of the north ” (Ez, i. 4). And when he was altar (R. Menataught the manner in which Israel met these northward attri- chem). The north butes of God, he was brought to the door of the inner gate of the tsaphon, the dark temple that looketh toward the north, and there was the seat of quarter, from the image of jealousy, that provoketh to jealousy, occupying the tsaphan, to hide northward gate of the altar to the exclusion of their God (Ez. and it may be for viii. 3—5). And when the vision of judgment was given, this reason that whereby these iniquities were to be swept away, “Behold six it was regarded men came from the way of the higher gate which lieth toward as the source of the north, and every man a slaughter weapon in his hand" evil"-Words

worth. (Ez. ix. 2).J

f B. W. Newton.

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14–17. (14) if .. fowls, Divine condescension meets the birds for the

case of the poorest. turtle-doves, prob. the common turtle sacrifice (turtur auritus). pigeons, prob. the blue rock pigeon (columba a Ps. xxii. 3, cxlv. schimperi): wild birds, yet selected. (15) wring .. head, 17; 1 Pe. i. 15, 16. rather, pinch it with his nail : not separate it fr. rest of body. “ The sacrifice of (16) pluck .. crop,a etc., to render the sacrifice clean.

(17) birds, Maimon- wood . . fire, etc., see vv. 8, 9.

Symbolic meaning of the east.The east is the quarter that is difficult especially connected with the glory of the God of Israel. “Afterservices of the ward he brought me to the gate, even the gate that looketh sanctuary; and toward the east: and behold the glory of the God of Israel came

on this ac- from the way of the east, and His voice was like a noise of many tion of the priest waters, and the earth shined with His glory” (Ezek. xliii. 1, 2). was not less en- The east wind also is continually mentioned in the Scripture as grossed by the that which withereth and drieth up the powers of nature. than by the most east wind shall come—the wind of the Lord shall come up from splendid, the ne- the wilderness, and his spring shall become dry, and his fountain cessity of attend. shall be dried up” (Hos. xiii. 15). If the north directs our ing to minute thoughts to the searching power of the Divine holiness, which is duties of religion as light, the east directs us to the unearthly glory, in the was strikingly in- presence of which unaided nature cannot stand. Light may

search, but glory withers or consumes. B. W. Newton,

66 An

culcated."--Bush.

CHAPTER THE SECOND.

identical

Harmer,

66

the meat- 1–6. (1) offer . . offering, lit. oblation of a meat-offering. offering fine flour, specification of quality, not quantity. (2) his.. a The Bedouins thereof, as a portion of the gift to be offered. memorial, i.e. use such a plate the handful. (3) remnant.. sons, the meat-offering designed of earthenware, in part for the sustentation of the priesthood. (4) oven, prob. which they call earthenware and portable. unleavened . . oil, usually baked that seems to be on the outside of the oven. (5) pan, or flat plate.« (6) part,

with break.b τήγανον, the word

The meat-offering.-Consider this meat-offering as a type of here used by the LXX. Robinson,

our sanctification by the Spirit. Note I. The sufferings of Christ; Bib. Res. i. 485; as typified by " the fine flour,” which was baked into a cake, and

Obser- then broken and burnt upon the altar. II. The endowments of vations, i. 477.

Christ, foreshadowed by “the oil." He was sanctified by the * The Bedouins Holy Ghost.” III. The perpetuity of the new covenant, salt." are in the habit IV. No corruption or sensuality to be mixed with the covenant, of breaking up “no leaven nor honey." V. The delight which God takes in the warm and mix- services of His upright worshippers, “ frankincense.”'c ing the fragments Eastern ovens.—Mr. Jackson, in his journey overland from with butter, when India, gives an account of an Eastern oven, equally instructive that luxury can

obtain e d. and amusing, as it confirms the statements of ancient travellers, Robinson, ii, 118. and shows the surprising expertness of the Arabian women in

baking their bread. They have a small place built with clay, C C. Simeon, M.A.

between two and three feet high, having a hole at the bottom “No quantity is for the convenience of drawing out the ashes, something similar here prescribed, to a lime-kiln.” The oven (which he thinks the most proper free - will offer- name for this place) is usually about fifteen inches wide at top, ing; only it must and gradually widening to the bottom. It is heated with wood, bo ine, no bran and when sufficiently hot, and perfectly clear from the smoke, the purity of having nothing but clear embers at the bottom, which continue Christ's sacrifice to reflect great heat, they prepare the dough in a large bowl, and

their cakes when

be

66

B.C. 1490.

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Nature of purity of heart.-I would have you attend to the full significance and extent of the term "holy." It is not abstinence from outward deeds of profligacy alone—it is not a mere recoil mind, from impurity in thought. It is that quick and sensitive polished plane, delicacy to which even the very conception of evil is offensive ; may admit foul it is a virtue which has its residence within, which takes thoughts with

receiving guardianship of the heart, as of a citadel or inviolated sanctuary, their tincture." in which no wrong or worthless imagination is permitted to Sterne. dwell. It is not purity of action that we contend for ; it is " The heart of a exalted purity of heart—the ethereal purity of the third heaven ; wise man should and if it is at once settled in the heart, it brings the peace, the

resemble a mir

ror, which triumph, and the untroubled serenity of heaven along with it-I flects every obhad almost said, the pride of a great moral victory over theject without infirmities of an earthly and accursed nature : there is a health being

bullied by and harmony in the soul; a beauty which, though it effloresces

any."-Confucius. in the countenance, and the outward path, is itself so thoroughly feminine, truth

“Purity is the internal, as to make purity of heart the most distinctive evidence the masculine, of of a work of grace in time, the most distinctive guidance of a honour."--Harc. character that is ripening and expanding for the glories of n Chalmers. eternity.

10-13. (10) if . . flocks,a etc., circumstances of offerer con- place of sulted : he who could not afford a bullock might bring a sheep killing the or goat. bring blemish, whatever was brought must be

a Is. liii. 7. perfect of its kind. (11) northward, the appointed place, a 10 See Bush. * not eastward, as the heathen sacrifices.". (12, 13) See vv. 8, 9. c Mal. i. 14; Jo.

The offering without blemish (v. 10).-I. To teach self-denial vi. 37. in matters of religion ; the best reserved for holy uses. II. To

d Le. iv. 24, 29,

33, vii. 2. produce feelings of profound reverence for the holiness of God. e Trapp. If the offering, how much more the offerer to be without blemish. “The Hebrew III. To lead the thoughts onward to the Perfect Sacrifice.

expositors Symbolic meaning of the north.The north, in Scripture, seems sacrifice was connected with such of the governmental attributes of God as killed are especially adverse to the dark vapours and corruptions of southward of the earth. Thence He sends forth that clear and purifying wind

was pol

(Maimonbefore which clouds and misty vapours disperse so as for the ides), and they light of heaven to shine in its clear, searching power—a power say that the north welcome to that which can bear inquisition and delight in is the symbol of

evil; as it is said being made manifest, but terrible to everything besides. Of the in Jer. i. 14, .out north it is said : “And now men see not the bright light which of the north an is in the clouds : but the wind passeth, and cleanseth them. Fair evil shall break (golden) weather cometh out of the north : with God is excellent forth;' and that, majesty” (Job xxxvii. 21, 22). And again, “The north wind sacrifices driveth away rain” (Pr. xxv. 23). When Ezekiel was commis- offered to avert sioned to testify against the dark corruptions of Israel, and

evil, therefore

they were killed beheld the glory of God in contrast therewith, “Behold, a whirl- northward of the wind came out of the north ” (Ez, i. 4). And when he was altar (R. Menataught the manner in which Israel met these northward attri- chem). The north

is in butes of God, he was brought to the door of the inner gate of the tsaphon, the dark temple that looketh tonard the north, and there was the seat of quarter, from the image of jealousy, that provoketh to jealousy, occupying the tsaphan, to hide northward gate of the altar to the exclusion of their God. (Ez. and it may be for

. viii. 3–5). And when the vision of judgment was given, this reason that whereby these iniquities were to be swept away, “Behold six it was regarded men came from the way of the higher gate which lieth toward as the source of

evil."—Words the north, and every man a slaughter weapon in his hand (Ez. ix. 2).J

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Hebrew B.C. 1490.

worth. f B. W. Newton.

ides
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count the atten-

14–17. (14) if .. fowls, Divine condescension meets the birds for the

case of the poorest. turtle-doves, prob. the common turtle sacrifice (turtur auritus). pigeons, prob. the blue rock pigeon (columba a Pg. xxii. 3, cxlv. schimperi): wild birds, yet selected. (15) wring .. head, 17; 1 Pe. i. 15, 16. rather, pinch it with his nail : not separate it fr. rest of body. " The sacrifice of (16) pluck .. crop,a etc., to render the sacrifice clean. (17) birds, Maimon- wood . . fire, etc., see vv. 8, 9. observes,

Symbolic meaning of the east.-The east is the quarter that is difficult especially connected with the glory of the God of Israel. “Afterservices of the ward he brought me to the gate, even the gate that looketh sanctuary; and toward the east : and behold the glory of the God of Israel came

on, this ac- from the way of the east, and His voice was like a noise of many tion of the priest waters, and the earth shined with His glory" (Ezek. xliii. 1, 2). was not less en- The east wind also is continually mentioned in the Scripture as grossed by the that which withereth and drieth up the powers of nature. An poorest sacrifice than by the most east wind shall come—the wind of the Lord shall come up from splendid, the ne- the wilderness, and his spring shall become dry, and his fountain cessity of attend. shall be dried up” (Hos. xiii. 15). If the north directs our ing to

the thoughts to the searching power of the Divine holiness, which is duties of religion as light, the east directs us to the unearthly glory, in the was strikingly in- presence of which unaided nature cannot stand,

Light may search, but glory withers or consumes. B. W. Newton.

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CHAPTER THE SECOND. the meat- 1–6. (1) offer .. offering, lit. oblation of a meat-offering, offering fine flour, specification of quality, not quantity. (2) his .. a The Bedouing thereof, as a portion of the gift to be offered.

memorial, i.e. use such a plate the handful. (3) remnant .. sons, the meat-offering designed of earthenware, in part for the sustentation of the priesthood. (4) oven, prob. which they call earthenware and portable. unleavened . . oil, usually baked tajen, a that seems to be on the outside of the oven. (5) pan, or flat plate.« (6) part, identical with break. τήγανον, the word

The meat-offering. Consider this meat-offering as a type of here used by the LXX.

our sanctification by the Spirit. Note I. The sufferings of Christ; Bib. Res. i. 485; as typified by " the fine flour,” which was baked into a cake, and Harmer, Obser- then broken and burnt upon the altar. II. The endowments of vations, i. 477.

Christ, foreshadowed by “the oil.” He was " sanctified by the 3 The Bedouins Holy Ghost.' III. The perpetuity of the new covenant, are in the habit IV. No corruption or sensuality to be mixed with the covenant, of breaking up " no leaven nor honey.” V. The delight which God takes in the warm and mix- services of His upright worshippers, “ frankincense."' ing the fragments Eastern ovens.- Mr. Jackson, in his journey overland from with butter, when India, gives an account of an Eastern oven, equally instructive that luxury can obtained.

and amusing, as it confirms the statements of ancient travellers, Robinson, ii. 118. and shows the surprising expertness of the Arabian women in

“ They have a small place built with clay, between two and three feet high, having a hole at the bottom “No quantity is for the convenience of drawing out the ashes, something similar here prescribed, to a lime-kiln." The oven (which he thinks the most proper because it was a tree - will offer- name for this place) is usually about fifteen inches wide at top, ing; only it must and gradually widening to the bottom. It is heated with wood, be fine, no bran and when sufficiently hot, and perfectly clear from the smoke, in it; to show the purity of having nothing but clear embers at the bottom, which continue Christ's sacrifice to reflect great heat, they prepare the dough in a large bowl, and

be

C C. Simeon, M.A. baking their bread.

B.C. 1490.

our services

of the oil

His

meat

and

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mould the cakes to the desired size on a board, or stone, placed near the oven. After they have kneaded the cake to a proper (He. vii. 26) and consistence, they pat it a little, then toss it about with great of dexterity in one hand, till it is as thin as they choose to make it through Him They then wet one side of it with water, at the same time wetting (Mal, iii ) by the hand and arm with which they put it into the oven.

The of His Spirit and side of the cake adheres fast to the side of the oven, till it is incense of sufficiently baked, when, if not paid proper attention to, it would intercession." –

Trapp. fall down among the embers. If they were not exceedingly quick at this work, the heat of the oven would burn their arms; but

; they perform it with such amazing dexterity, that one woman a Paxton. will continue keeping three or four cakes in the oven at once, till she has done baking. This mode, he adds, requires not half the fuel that is consumed in Europe.d

7-11. (7) frying pan,“ or pan. (8) he.. altar, to sig. the baked that it is all devoted. (9) memorial, sce v. 2. (10) that..

offering left, etc., see v. 3. (11) honey, wh., like leaven, might pro

a "There is in duce fermentation,

use among the The priest's portion. It was to be—I. The people's gift. In- Bedouins 1. Obedience to the Divine will; 2. Respect for the priest's others a shallow

vessel, office. II. The residue of the offering : “ that which is left.' The priest, as a true servant, to think first of the great Master. sembling a frying Poisonous honey.-It should be mentioned that honey occa- pan, and which is

both for sionally possesses very deleterious properties. Xenophon, in his used

frying and for history of the retreat of the l'en Thousand (Anabasis, bk. iv.), baking one sort describes the honey of Trebizond as having produced the effect of of bread."—Bush. temporary madness, or rather drunkenness, on the whole army 6 Gal. v. 9; Mk. who ate of it. Mr. Abbot, writing from Trebizond, in 1833, to viii, 15; Lu. xii. the Secretary of the Zoological Society, observes that he has him-1; 1 Co. v. 8. self witnessed that the effects of this honey are still precisely the 6, 9, “Signifying same as those which Xenophon describes, and he adopts the viewsibo perpetual

benefits propounded by Tournefort, in 1704, that the poisonous properties Christ's death to are consequent on the bees extracting the honey from the Azalea all believers." Pontica, Many other instances of poisonous honey are on

Trapp. record.

12—16. (12) as .. first-fruits,a ref. to the leaven and honey. the offering but .. savour, see v. 11. (13) salt, the opposite to leaven, as

of first-fruits it preserves fr. putrefaction and corruption. salt .. covenant, le. sxiii. 10; Pr.

a Ex. . ; so called bec. incorruptible. (14) green .. fire, to admit of iii. 9, 10; Ma. vi. their being ground. (15) oil .. frankincense, “sig. the graces 33. of God in Christ and His members, and the sweet odour of His 6 Ac. ii. 27, iii. oblation for us.”c (16) memorial, see v. 2.

15; Mk. ix. 49;

Col. iv. 6. Green ears of corn to be offered.-For the purpose of bringing

"Salt sig. the the ordinance here mentioned before you in the simplest manner, purity and persewe will notice—I. Its distinguishing peculiarities : the ears of vering fidelity necorn were to be green. II. Its special import. The “

green cessary in ears,” we think, are intended to denote the younger converts. worshippers

God" . III. The instruction to be derived from it. It is highly instructive

c Trapp. to-1. Parents ; 2. Ministers ; 3. Young people.d

d C. Simeon, M.d. The sacrifice to be salted. The contrast in which “salt” is

v. 14, “To sig. here set with “honey” (v. 11) sufficiently indicates its meaning. that God should If honey gives to character an earthly sweetness, salt, on the be served with other hand, imparts a heavenly savour. If our characters have the first-fruits of it, they savour of God, not of men. “Let your speech be always rose of our chil

our age, the primwith grace, seasoned with salt." The Holy Ghost, whom Christ dren."-Trapp.

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