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CONTENTS.

Page Object of the Work ·

1 History of Canada from the Conquest to the Grievances of 1828

2 Note on the Receiver-General's Defalcation

6 Canada Committees of 1828

7 Acceptance of its Report in the Colony

8 Fulfilment of the Report in 1832 Subsequent Disputes

19 Lord Gosford's Administration

25 State of the Question at the Revolt

31 Demands which led to the Revolt examined

32 Pretended Parallels disproved

46 Gross Inaccuracies of Mr. Roebuck's “ Portfolio"

51 Recapitulation

58

11

APPENDIX: Enclosure No. 2. in Lord Aberdeen's Despatch

to Lord Amherst, dated April 2.

63 THE

CANADIAN CONTROVERSY.

inn ia sa forcibly

ERRATA.

Page 41. line 8. for " or township in a county,” read “or a township or

a county'
44. line 18. for “ mutual,” read “ mortal."
53. line 4. for “ 1833," read “ 1831."
53. line 5. for “ 1834,” read “ 1835."
59. line 24. for “ firm,” read “ fice.”

new topics or an Cacing pressed on the public mind, and then leave them with confidence to their own judgment. The facts are not ineloquent, and to give them a voice is all that is necessary. There is no occasion to perplex the statement with questions about this administration and that administration. Party politics have no entrance here; for all parties during many years past have, when in power, shown the utmost spirit of conciliation towards the men who are now in arms. The issue to be tried, there

В

THE

CANADIAN CONTROVERSY.

At a moment when general attention is so forcibly called, and by such distressing events,to the quarrel in Lower Canada, it becomes of importance to supply a correct answer to the question which is in every one's mouth, what it is about, and how it has arisen. This is the object of the present publication. It is not proposed to encumber it with long arguments, but merely to let people know what the controversy really is, to guard them against the misconceptions and hasty views which will naturally arise (perhaps be suggested), when new topics of an exciting kind are so suddenly pressed on the public mind, and then leave them with confidence to their own judgment. The facts are not ineloquent, and to give them a voice is all that is necessary. There is no occasion to perplex the statement with questions about this administration and that administration. Party politics have no entrance here; for all parties during many years past have, when in power, shown the utmost spirit of conciliation towards the men who are now in arms. The issue to be tried, there.

B

fore, is shortly between the statesmen of Great Britain, without distinction of party, on the one hand, and the agitators of Lower Canada on the other. Another preliminary remark is, that with a view to forming a judgment on the rights of the present struggle, it is needless to discuss each stage of the British Government's past policy. Throughout, until the present crisis, that policy has been yielding. Whatever, therefore, may have been its merits in other respects,– whether the concessions that were successively made ought to have been postponed or qualified, or, as some think, altogether withheld,- it is not the less certain that the fit return for them cannot have been rebellion, and that those who most loudly demanded them cannot now plead these as their reasons for plunging their followers into a deadly contest, their church and institutions into danger, and their country at large into the miseries of a civil war.

Immediately after the cession of Canada to Great Britain, the laws of England were introduced by a royal proclamation dated 7th October, 1763. In 1774 an act of parliament was passed restoring the French law in civil causes, securing the most ample toleration to the Roman Catholic Church and laity, and establishing a council with a power to make laws. Another Act of the same year (the 14 Geo. 3. c. 88., a statute much noted in subsequent disputes) repealed various burdensome duties that had been levied under the French Government, and substituted for them more moderate

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