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MILLEDULCIA.

THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE.

HE undoubted author of the monody on the Burial of Sir John Moore, is the late Rev. Charles Wolfe, a young Irishman, curate of Donoughmore, diocese of

Armagh, who died 1823, in the 32d year of his age. His Life and Remains were edited by the Archdeacon of Clogher; and a fifth edition of the volume, which is an 8vo, was published in 1832 by Hamilton, Adams & Co., Paternoster Row. At the twenty-fifth page of the Memoir there is the narration of an interesting discussion between Lord Byron, Shelley, and others, as to the most perfect ode that had ever been produced, Shelley contended for Coleridge's on Switzerland; others named Campbell's Hohenlinden and Lord Byron's Invocation in Manfred. But Lord Byron left the dinner-table before the cloth was removed, and returned with a magazine, from which he read this monody, which just then appeared anonymously. After he had read it, he repeated the third stanza, and pronounced it perfect, and especially the lines

But he lay like a warrior taking his rest,

With his martial cloak around him.

" I should have taken the whole," said Shelley, "for a rough sketch of Campbell's."

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