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IV.-PUBLIC EXPENDITURE OF IRELAND,

IN THE YEAR ENDED FIFTH JANUARY 1817.

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J. For Interest on the Funded Debt of

$. d.
Ireland, including Annuities for
Lives ind Terans of Yer's also
£.I per Ceat. for the Reduction
of the Capital, cr-ared by Loan:
since 1797

6,766,299 6 41
For Charge of Management thereon
There was applied towards the Re-
duction of ihe National Debt... 67,649 1 0

6,833,888 7 43 Whereof was applied towards the

Reduction o' The National Debt. 2,434,427 13 13 Total on account of Interest .. 4,399,460 14 231 Ditto for Charge of Management, .

30,305 5 8 Ditto on account of the Reduction of the National Debt

2,434,427 13 14

6,864,193 13 05

II. For Interest on Exchequer Bills

126,500 0 0

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III. Issues for the separate Service of Ireland
IV. Issues from Appropriated Funds for Local Purposes..

Sivil List
V. Pensions to the 25th March 1813

Other Permanent Charges
VI. Payments in Anticipation of Exchequer Receipes ; viz.
Boun:ies from Customs

27,625 13
Bounties from Excise

465 16

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8

Militia, Deserters' Warrants, &c. from Excise

28,091 10 5
7,432 5 21

VII. Ordnance

95,529 15 73 140,000

VII. Army - Ordinary Services, viz.

Regulars, Militia, and Volunteer Corps, &c.
Commissariat Establishment
Barracks
Staff Officers and Officers of Garrisons
Half.pay Supernumerary, and Retired Officers.
Officers' Widows
Royal Hospital, Kilmaioham
Public Officers, their Deputies, Clerks, and con

tingent Expenses
Superannuated Officers
Disembodied Militia

1,398,681

3 11 206,052 8 341 193,577 15 55 71,205 4 14 41,135 17 8

16,723 5 13 121,043 4 5

10,785 19/

5,306 15 11 108,:30 0 0 2,172 640 16 94

196,186 18 77

Extraordinary Services

IX. Miscellaneous Services

2,368,827 15 44

592,626 8 61

Lastly, Vote of Credit, Arrear of 1815

20,261 991

14,612,560 6 44

V.PUBLIC FUNDED DEBT OF IRELAND,
AS THE SAME STOOD ON THE FIFTH JANUARY 1817.

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£.

....

15,149,058 17 1

835,600 0 0 11,944,296 15 9

£. s. d SUM Raised

100,639,833 9 7 PAYABLE IN DUBLIN. £.8. 10s. per Cent. per Annum 4

per Cent per Annum 5 per Cent. per Annum

PAYABLE IN LONDON. 5 per cent. per Annum 3 per Cent. Consolidated Annuities

42,087,625 0 0 S per Cent. Reduced Annuities

52,768,750 0 0 4 per Cent. Consolidated Annuities

5,954,375 0 5 per cent. Navy Annuities

2,220,000 ANNUAL CHARGE. Annual Interest

4,716,599 19 01 Annuities on Lives or Terms of Years

188,049 18 10 Pursuant to Act 37 Geo. 3. for Redemption of Debt then existing

139,816 14 8 By Acts providing £.1 per cent. for redemption of Debts created since 1797

1,409,124 2 11

1,873.412 4 11 45,594,927 1 8 57,160, 45 16 8 6,450,572 18 4 2,107,166 13 4

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Total Principal:

Total of Annual Expense

6,459,530 15 54 141,441,180 79

An Account of the Progress made in the RedEMPTION of the Public Debt of

IRELANI), at the 5th January 1817.

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£.

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5-per Cents. 4 per Cents. Si per Cents.

£.
£. 3. d.

d.
....115,569,797 18 4 1,862,472 18 11 1,665,649 7 4
1,097,100 0 0 471,450 0 0

417,759 2 10 17,380,972 17 1 6,478,739 13 84,893,114 1

£. $. 89 8 7 S8 19 2 75 10 6

9793

Deduct capitals cancelled 34,047,870 15 5 8,812,662 12 76,976,521 11

per 56 Geo. 3, cap. 89,
for defraying the Gross 4,378,486 0 0 4,378,486 0 0
Charge of £.3,041,666.
135. 4d. Treasury Bills
raised in 1816..

Actual State of Debt.. 29,669,384 15 54,434, 176 12

7

Sums Annually applicable to the REDUCTION of the Debt, funded in Irish Securities.

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Annual Charge, per Act 37 Geo. 3, for Redemption of £.5,829,156. 135. 4d, the

Debt then existing Annuities for Years, which have expired £.1 per cent. on £28,218,714, 2s. id. Capitals created from 1797 to 1815, in

clusive £.1 per cent. on £ 2,705,000 Treasury Bills, outstanding 5th January 1816. Annual Interest on £.1,862,472, 18s. ild. Redeemed Capital at 5 per cent. ....Ditto.... on £.471,450.

Ditto....Ditto,... at 4 per Cent ...Ditto.... on £.6,478,739. 13s. 8d. Ditto....Ditto.... at 34 per Cent.

282,187 2 9 27,050 0 0 93,123 12 11 18,858 0 0 226,755 17 9

787,791 8

S.

Chargeable on Sinking Fund, per 56 Geo. 3, cap. 89, for

£.3,041,666 135. 4d Treasury Bills, raised in 1816 Deduct £. 1 per cent. for Sinking Fund for said Bills

L. d. 182,500 11 93 30,416 13 4

152,083 18 54

Actual Sinking Fund, at 5th January 1817

635,707 9 75

VI.-UNFUNDED DEBT OF IRELAND.

An Account of the UNFUNDED Debt of IRELAND, and DEMANDS OUTSTANDING

on the 5th of Day January 1817.

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Loan DeBENTURES.
Residue of Debentures bearing £.4 per Cent. Interest, to

the Year 1788, provided for by the 27 and 28 Geo. 3,
but unclaimed by the Proprietors; viz.
Old Loan

Loan by Lottery 1780 ' Loan by Lottery 1781

TREASURY Bills. = Outstanding Treasury Bills provided for by several Acts

of Parliament, but unclaimed by the Proprietors; viz. Payable 24 June 1783

24 June 1790
24 June 1791
24 June 1801
25 March 1803
25 March 1816

2,225 00

8 6 8 50) 0 0 100 0

50 0 0 100 0 0 100 0 0

(406 6 8

0
0

TREASURY BILLs not in course of Payment. Issued pursuant to 53 Geo.3, c.61. payable 25 March 1817 235,000 0

payable 24 Dec.

1817 1,000,000 0 56 Geo. 3, c. 41, payable 25 March 1818

300,000 0 0 payable 9 Oct. 1818 574,166 13 4 payable 4 Jan. 1817 595,835 6 payable 4 July 1817 1,033,533 6

1817 758,333 6

1818 325,000 0 0 56 Geo. 3, c.47, Şpayable 4 Jan.

payable 24 June 1818 875,000 0 0

56 Geo. 3, c. 42, { payable 9 Oct.

8 8 8

5,746,666 13 4

LOTTERY Prizes.
Outstanding Lottery Prizes of the several Lotteries from 1782 to 1801.

25,583 00

5,774,883 0 0

REPORT FROM THE SELECT COMMIT

TEE ON THE POOR LAWS.

charitable, and to the suppression of vagrancy and idleness ; for while permission to solicit support from

private benevolence was given to The select committee appointed to those who were disabled by age or

consider of the poor laws, and to infirmity, it became probably exreport their observations there. tremely difficult to repress the same upon from time to time to the practice in others, who " as long as house,--have, pursuant to the they might live by begging, did reorder of the house, considered fuse to labour, giving themselves to the same accordingly, and agreed idleness and vice,” (23 Ed.3.) Ento the following report:

actments, the most harsh were there.

fure provided against "strong beg. Your committee have forborne gars, persons whole and mighty in to avail themselves of the permis- body," and the relentless rigour of sion to report their observations these laws, which was consummated from time to time to the house, in the first year of Edw.VI. visited from the persuasion that they could the offence of vagrancy with the bar not do justice to so extensive and in- barous penalties of slavery, mutila. tricate a subject, by presenting it in tion, and death. And although these detached parts, before they had the severities were somewhat relaxed, means of taking a deliberate view even before the expiration of that of the whole ; and not seeing it pro- short reign, yet they did not wholly bable that they could recommend give way to a milder system till any such alteration of the existing the beginning of the last century, laws, as would afford immediate (12 Ann. st. 2. c. 23.) relief in those cases of severe and The impotent peor, on the other urgent pressure, which can scarcely hand, were permitted to beg within be deemed to have arisen out of the certain districts, and no means of ordinary operation of this system, exhortation were spared to excite they could not feel themselves jus. the people “to be liberal, and bountified in offering any suggestions tifully to extend their good and chahastily to the house, on questions of ritable alms towards the comfort acknowledged difficulty, enhanced and relief of the poor, impotent, in a high degree by the circum- decrepit, indigent and needy peostances of the times, and on which ple,” (12 Ann. st. 2. c. 7. 11 H. 7. they cannot but recollect, that the c. 2. `19 H. 7. c. 12. 22 H, S. remedial efforts of he most able 27 H. 8. c. 25. 1 Ed. 6. c. 3. 3 & and enlightened men have practi. 4 Ed. 6. c. 16. 5 & 6 Ed. 6. c. 2. cally failed.

5 Eliz. c. S.) Subsequent statutes In bringing under the view of the in the reign of Edw. VI. were house the whole of this system of directed to the same object, till at laws, they feel it unnecessary to re. length, by the 5 Eliz. c. 3. upon fer minutely to the statutes which the exhortation of the priest, bishop, passed antecedent to the reign of and justices in sessions, having been queen Elizabeth. It may be suffi- directed in vain to those who were cient to state, that they were gene- unwilling to contribute, the justices, rally directed to the relief of the after repeated admonition, were em. impotent poor, by the contributions powered with the churchwardens to of the church and the alms of the assess such persons according to their discretion, for a weekly contribution. ing classes, on which, according to Thus gradually was established a the nature of things, the happiness general and compulsory provision and welfare of mankind has been for the maintenance of the impotent made to rest. By diminishing this poor; it was modified and extended natural impulse by which men are by various successive enactments, instigated to industry and good conand at length matured and consoli- duct, by superseding the necessity dated by the statute of the 4:3d of of providing in the season of health the same reign, which continues to and vigour for the wants of sickness this day the fundamental and opera- and old a re, and by making pover. tive law on this important subject, ty and misery the conditions on (14 Eliz. c. 5. 18 Eliz. c. 9.39 Eliz. which relief is to be obtained, your c. 3.)

committee cannot but fear, from a Tiis statute enacts, that “the reference to the increased numbers church wardens and overseers” shall of the poor, and increased and intake order from time to time (with creasing amount of the sums raised the consent of two or more justices) for their relief, that this system is for setting to work the children of perpetually encouraging and inall such whose parents shall not be creasing the amount of misery it thought able to keep and maintain was designed to alleviate, creating their children; and also for setting at the same time an unlimited de to work all such persons, married or mand on funds which it cannot aug. unmarried, having no means to ment; and as every system of relief maintain them, and using no ordi- founded on compulsory enactments nary or daily trade of life to get their must be divested of the character of living by; and also to raise by taxa- benevolence, so it is without its betion, &c. “a convenient stock of neficial effects : as it proceeds from fax, &c. to set the poor on work ;' ro impulse of charity; it creates no and also competent sums of money feelings of gratitude, and not une for and towards the necessary relief frequently engenders dispositions of the lame, impotent, old, blind, and habits calculated to separate and such other among them, being rather than unite the interests of the poor and not able to work." higher and lower orders of the com

This new and important principle munity; even the obligations of na. of compulsory provision for the im- tural affection are no longer left to potent, and for setting to work the their own impulse, but the mutual able, originated withont doubt in support of the nearest relations has motives of the porest humanity, and been actually enjoined by a positive was directed to the cquitable pur- law, which the authority of magise pose of preventing this burthen fall- trates is continually required to ening exclusively upon the charitable. force. The progress of these evils, But such a compulsory contribution which are inherent in the system ile for the indigent, from the funds self, appears to have been favoured originally accumulated from the la- by the circumstances of moderu bour and industry of others, could times, by an extension of the law in not fail in process of time, with the practice, and by some deviations increase of population which it was from its most important provisions. calculated to foster, to produce the How much of the complaints which unfortunate effect of abating those have been referred to your commisexertions on the part of the labour. tee may be attributable to one cause

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