Classical Pasts: The Classical Traditions of Greece and Rome

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James I. Porter
Princeton University Press, 2006 - 450 strán (strany)
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The term "classical" is used to describe everything from the poems of Homer to entire periods of Greek and Roman antiquity. But just how did the concept evolve? This collection of essays by leading classics scholars from the United States and Europe challenges the limits of the current understanding of the term. The book seeks not to arrive at a final definition, but rather to provide a cultural history of the concept by exploring how the meanings of "classical" have been created, recreated, and rejected over time. The book asks questions that have been nearly absent from the scholarly literature. Does "classical" refer to a specific period of history or to the artistic products of that time? How has its definition changed? Did those who lived in classical times have some understanding of what the term "classical" has meant? How coherent, consistent, or even justified is the term?


The book's introduction provides a generous theoretical and historical overview. It is followed by eleven chapters in which the contributors argue for the existence not of a single classical past, but of multiple, competing classical pasts. The essays address a broad range of topics--Homer and early Greek poetry and music, Isocrate, Hellenistic and Roman art, Cicero and Greek philosophy, the history of Latin literature, imperial Greek literature, and more. The most up-to-date and challenging treatment of the topic available, this collection will be of lasting interest to students and scholars of ancient and modern literature, art, and cultural history.

 

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Obsah

Chapter 1
69
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70
100
77
Chapter 2
89
Chapter 3
106
Chapter 4
127
Chapter 5
173
Chapter 6
204
프 프르르르 진진진면
266
Jaś ELSNER
270
Chapter 9
301
Chapter 10
353
Chapter 11
377
BIBLIOGRAPHY
389
CONTRIBUTORS
431
Autorské práva

Chapter 7
237

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Populárne pasáže

Strana 47 - We are talking about characteristic elements of impulse, restraint and tone; specifically affective elements of consciousness and relationships: not feeling against thought, but thought as felt and feeling as thought: practical consciousness of a present kind, in a living and interrelating continuity.
Strana 45 - The body believes in what it plays at: it weeps if it mimes grief. It does not represent what it performs, it does not memorize the past, it enacts the past, bringing it back to life. What is 'learned by body' is not something that one has, like knowledge that can be brandished, but something that one is.
Strana 41 - ... nor beautiful in relation to one thing and ugly in relation to another; nor is it beautiful here but ugly there, as it would be if it were beautiful for some people and ugly for others. Nor will the beautiful appear to him in the guise of a face or hands or anything else that belongs to the body. It will not appear to him as one idea or one kind of knowledge. It is not anywhere in another thing, as in...

O tomto autorovi (2006)

James I. Porter is Professor of Greek, Latin, and Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Nietzsche and the Philology of the Future and The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy.

Bibliografické informácie