History of Civilization in England, Zväzok 2

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Nothing can weaken superstition but knowledge
62
Decline of manufactures and of population and increase
77
Their leader Melville personally insulted the king and they were
106
In 1700 when affairs were at their worst the Austrian dynasty
107
These three causes influenced the policy of Ferdinand and Isabella 1819
133
Who endeavoured to improve the country by weakening
141
The Spaniards have moreover long been celebrated for honour
145
CHAPTER II
157
career
159
The result was that all mirth all innocent gaiety all demonstra
162
CONDITION OF SCOTLAND DURING THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH
169
set
178
They were too feeble and insignificant to elect their own magis
185
CHAPTER III
197
The Crown in its efforts against the nobles was encouraged
206
The nobles revenged themselves by becoming Reformers 212213
212
As the nobles took the opposite side and as the people had no
216
While Knox was abroad the nobles established the Reformation
227
Thereupon the Protestant preachers said that the nobles were
236
The first manifestation of this rebellious spirit was the attack
242
Struggle between the upper classes and the clergy respecting 01249
249
Irish invasion of Scotland
250
episcopacy
261
The injuries which these invasions inflicted upon Scotland stopped
266
Loyalty became united with superstition and each strengthened
285
The only powerful friends of this bad government were
294
Connexion between the rise of the trading spirit and the abolition
302
And their growth was itself assisted by the Union with England
312
CHAPTER V
330
In 1603 the King of Scotland became also King of England
396
Hence the secular philosophy of the eighteenth century though
418
national character than the teaching of a deductive philo
427
In 1637 the reaction declared itself and in 1638 the bishops were
435
His Theory of Moral Sentiments and his Wealth of Nations
437
But it was of no avail because politicians can do nothing when
439
In the nineteenth century political reformers again endeavoured
458
His Natural History of Religion
469
Reids philosophy
477
But this sort of progress depending too much upon individuals
483
In 1688 another reaction in which the Scotch again freed them
485
He derived great aid from poetry
510
For industry was impossible and the commonest arts were
511
In this respect Scotland is similar to Germany but dissimilar
516
The action of fire and water on the crust of the earth may
519
Assuming however for the purposes of classification that
533
In this way general causes always triumph over particular
539
Cullens theory of the solids
542
His nosology
548
But circumstances made him inductive and he collected facts
555
VOL II
556
He recognized the great truth that the sciences of the inorganic
563
But his English contemporaries being eminently inductive so dis
573
Notwithstanding this difference the deductive method was
579
The Scotch literature of the eighteenth century being essentially
584
In physical philosophy the deductive method was equally pre
585
In his mind the inductive and deductive methods struggled
587
The laws of beat
597
The notions countenanced there respecting the origin of epidemics
598

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Strana 446 - By pursuing his own interest he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it.
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