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comfort. The coarse black bailey-bread and muddy wine which had been given them lest death should cheat the mob of their promised delight on the morrow, the venerable priest had consecrated to the Supper of the Lord—the last viaticum to strengthen their souls on their journey to the spirit world. Sitting at his feet, faint and wan, but with a look of utter content upon her face, was his daughter Callirhoë, a heavenly smile flickering about her lips. With an undaunted courage, a heroic resolve beaming from his eyes, stood Adauctus, waiting, like a valiant soldier at his post, the welcomie word of the great Captain of his salvation : "Well done! good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Loru.”

Ever and anon the deep-mouthed roar of a lungry lion rent the air, his fierce bound shook the walls of his cage, and his hot breath came tirough the bars as he keenly suffed the smell of human flesì. But though it caused at times a tremor of the quivering nerves of the wan and wasted girl, it shook not her uufaltering soul. Listen to the holy words calmly spoken by the venerable Demetrius: “Non turvetur cor restrum -Let not your heart be troubled. In my Father's house are many mansions. I go to prepare a place for you.' Yes, daughter. Yes, brave friend; before another sun shall set we shall see the King in His beauty, and the land that is very far off. Mine aged eyes shall see, too, the beloved Rachel of my youth, to behold whom they have ached these many years.

And thou, child, shalt see the mother after whom thy heart hath yearned."

“If only, dear father, my brother Ezra were with us,” whispered Callirhoë, “we soon would be an unbroken family in the city of the great King."

“God's will be done, my child," answered the patriarch. “He doeth all things well. He could bid His angels fly swiftly, and shut the lions' mouths, or better still, convoy our spirits to the marriage supper of the Lamb—to the repose of Abraham's bosom. Your brother is a child of the covenant, an heir of the promises, the son of many prayers. God will count him also in the day when He maketh up His jewels.” Then, as if gifted with the spirit of prophecy, he exclaimed: “Not always shall the servants of the Most High be persecuted unto death. But this very structure, now dedicated to slaughter and cruelty, shall hereafter be cousecrated to the service of the true God”-a prediction which, after long centuries, has been literally fulfilled.

Thus in holy converse wore the hours away. And then through the rocky vaults of the Coliseum stole the sweet accents of their last evening hymn before they should sing the song of Moses and the Lamb on high :

“ He that dwelleth in the secret place of the Most High, shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

“I will say of the Lord, He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in Him will I trust.

“He shall give His angels charge over thee, to keep thee in all thy ways.

“Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder; the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under foot."

As this pæan of triumph swelled into louder strain, the gladiators, awed by its strange power, paused amid their ribald jests, and even the lion hushed his hungry roar. and the tiger his angry

growl

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ARLY next morning the army of slaves who

had charge of the Coliseum, under the direction of Fulvus, the freedman, were hard at work. Some at the very summit of the building, with much shouting and pulling of ropes, were stretching the great velarium or awuing, as a protection from the rays of the sun. Others were sweeping the sand of the arena to a smooth and even surface. Many cart loads of fresh sand were heaped around the base of the podium, for the ghastly purpose of being spread upon the bloodstained surface after each act of the sanguinary drama of the day. Others were decorating with garlands of flowers, and with gold and purple bannerets, the seats of the Emperors Diocletian and Galerius, and those of the senators and other persons of distinction. The great structure seemed even more striking in its vastness, as a few score figures crawled like flies over its empty seats, than when filled with its tumultuous throng of spectators. It was an immense oval six hundred and fifteen feet in its longer diameter, and five hundred and ten feet in the shorter. The circling seats rose tier op tier to the giddy height of one hundred and fifty feet.

As the present writer climbed those cliff-like walls, now crumbling into ruin, he tried to repeople those long-deserted seats with the eager and excited throngs which had often filled them to overflowing, when twice eighty thousand cruel eyes were wont to gloat upon the dying martyr's pang," butchered to make a Roman holiday."* Then he wandered through the vast vaulted corridors and stairways, eighty in number, and bearing still the old Roman numerals by which access was gained to the different galleries. These were so capacious that the whole multitude could in a few minutes disperse, and were thence called vomitoriu. He then explored the dens and caves for the wild beasts, and the rocky chambers in

* On this very arena perished the venerable Ignatius, linked by tradition with the Saviour Himself as one of the children whom He took in His arms and blessed. “ Sutser me to be the food of wild beasts,” he exclaimed, " by wnom I shall attain unto God. For I am the wheat of God, and I shall be ground by the teeth of wild beasts, that I may become the pure bread of Christ.”

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