Obrázky na stránke
PDF
ePub

Page

[ocr errors]

Do.

From LALLA ROOKH.-
From 111. The Fire-worshippers,

70 Hinda's Love,

89 *The Peri's Song,

94 From iv. From the Light of the Harem : Cashmere,

95 Light Causes may create Dissension,

96 *Song of the Arab Maid,

97 NATIONAL AIRS.— *Hark! the Vesper Hymn is Stealing-Russian, 99 Do.

* Reason, Folly, and Beauty- Italian, 99 Do. *Oh, Come to Me when Daylight SetsVenetian,

100 Do. *All that's Bright must Fade-Indian, 101 Do. *Oft in the Stilly Night—Scotch,

102 SACRED MELODIES.—*Miriam's Song-Sound the Loud Timbrel, 103 *This World is all a Fleeting Show,

103 THE FUDGE FAMILY IN PARIS.—*Miss Biddy's Last Epistle, 104 RHYMES ON THE ROAD.—Different Attitudes in which Authors Compose,

119 Do. *Extract I.,

120 Do. *Extract IX.,

122 Do. *Extract X.,

124 FABLES FROM THE HOLY ALLIANCE.—A Dream,

125 LOVES OF THE ANGELS.—Song of Lilis, from the Second Angel's Story,

127 Do.

Nama and Zaraph's Love, from
the Third Angel's Story,

128 Moore's Verse Described by Himself, in Lalla Rookh,

133 Evening Described by Milton and Moore,

133-4 Irish MELODIES.—*Sublime was the Warning,

140 Do. *Go where Glory waits thee,

141 Do. *Oh! Breathe not his Name,

142 Do. *When He who Adores Thee,

142 Do. *At the Mid Hour of Night,

143 Do. *Oh the Shamrock,

143 *The Young May Moon,

144 Do. *The Harp that Once through Tara's Halls, 145 Do. *The Meeting of the Waters,

145

Do.

.

[ocr errors]

[ocr errors]

Page IRISH MELODIES.—*The Origin of the Harp,

146 Do. *Sing Sweet Harp,

146 Do. *Love's Young Dream,

147 Do.

*Oh Arranmore, loved Arranmore, 148 Do. *Sweet. Innisfallen,

149 Do.

*Oh, Could we Do with this World of Ours, 150 Do. *I Saw thy Form in Youthful Prime, 151 Do. *She is Far from the Land,

152 Do. *'Tis the Last Rose of Summer,

152 Do. *The Minstrel Boy,

153 Do. *I Saw from the Beach,

153 Do. * Come Rest in this Bosom,

154 Do. *As Slow our Ship,

154 Do. *Dear Harp of my Country,

155 BALLADS, SONGS, &c.--*When Midst the Gay I Meet,

156 Do. *When Twilight Dews,

157 Do. *The Dream of Home,

157 Do.

*They tell me Thou’rt the Favoured
Guest,

158
Do.
*The Fancy Fair,

158 Do. * Beauty and Song,

159 Do.

*Oh, do not Look so Bright and Blest, 160 FROM EVENINGS IN GREECE.—*Song,

166 The Temple of the Moon (Prose extract), from THE EPICUREAN, 169 ALCIPHRON,

173 *THE PERIWINKLES AND THE LOCUSTS, A SALMAGUNDIAN HYMN,

179 THE SUMMER FETE-Descriptive,

186 Do.

*Song-Bring hither, bring thy Lute,
while Day is Dying,

188 Do.

*Song—Who'll Buy? ’tis Folly's Shop,
Who'll Buy?

188 *Thoughts on Editors: a Squib,

193 *Epigram,

197 *Translation from the Gull Language: a Political Squib, 198 From THE FUDGES IN ENGLAND.—*Larry O'Branigan's Letter, 203

219 *Letter in Rhyme to Sydney Smith, *There was a Little Man: a Ballad,

234

[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]

PORTICAL TRIBUTES TO THE WEMIXT OF MOCHE

T. 1). Hullivan'> Moore Centenary Odle
*Huwarid's Tribute to Moore,
*Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes on Thomas Mocce,
Denis l'orence Mac Carthy's Ode to Moore,

Page 242 243 244 246

THOMAS MOORE:

HIS LIFE

AND WRITING S.

CHAPTER I.

EARLY AND COLLEGE DAYS IN DUBLIN.

THOMAS MOORE was born in Dublin, in the year 1780, of humble but respectable parents, both of whom were Roman Catholics. His father, John Moore, was a grocer and keeper of a small wine store in Aungier Street, where his dwelling-house was over the shop. The usual date assigned for Moore's birth is 1779; but, although the latter date appears upon his tomb-stone, the baptismal register, which has been published by Earl Russell, is still in existence, and proves that he was born in 1780. To his mother's judicious home-training, Moore was indebted for his future success in society.

He was first sent to school, at a very early age, to a Mr. Malone, in the same street—"a wild, odd fellow," he says, “of whose cocked hat I have still a clear remembrance, and who used to pass the greater part of his nights in drinking at public houses, and was hardly ever able to make his appearance in the school before noon. He would then generally whip the boys all round for disturbing his slumbers."

He afterwards attended the grammar-school of Mr. Samuel White, eminent as an elocutionist, but more

[ocr errors]

widely known as the teacher of Richard Brinsley Sheridan, and Thomas Moore.

His youth was spent in a troubled political period. The French Revolution was regarded as a hopeful event by the Ultramontane party in Ireland, and the poet used to tell how he remembered, at a great public dinner, sitting on the chairman's knee, while the toast, “May the breezes from France fan the Irish oak into verdure,” went round amidst triumphant cheering.

In 1794 Moore entered Trinity College, Dublin, with a view to study for law. His career there was more than an ordinary success, although, hating Latin hexameters, he often substituted English for Latin verse, when he conveniently could do so. From his childhood he had exhibited a genius for lyric verse and music; and two of his productions, dropped into the letter-box of a Dublin magazine called The Anthologia, appeared in its pages, bearing the initials “T. M.,” when he was only fourteen years of age. He was fond of recitation, and was Mr. White's favourite show-scholar. “I attained the honour," says Moore, "of being singled out by him on days of public examination as one of his most successful and popular exhibitors to the no small jealousy, as may be supposed, of all other mammas, and the great glory of my own. As I looked particularly infantine for my age, the wonder was,

of course, still more wonderful. "Oh, he's an old little crab,' said one of the rival Cornelias, on an occasion of this kind; 'he can't be less than eleven or twelve years of age.' Then, madam,' said a gentleman sitting next to her, who was slightly acquainted with our family, if that is the case he must have been four years old before he was born. This answer, which was reported to my mother, won her warm heart towards that gentleman for ever after.

6

« PredošláPokračovať »