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DAVID BRAINERD.

303

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culty in the way:

As to my affairs here-I took a journey last October to Susquehannah, and continued there some time, preaching to the Indians frequently in a place called Opehollaupung about fifteen or twenty miles down the river from the place you formerly visited. I supposed I had some encouragement among them, and I propose to visit them again about the middle of next month, with leave of Divine providence, and think to spend most of the summer in those parts, if a door opens for it. There is one peculiar diffiThe land these Indians live upon, belong to the Six Nations; that is, the Mohawks; and 'tis something doubtful whether they will suffer a missionary to come among their tributaries, and on to their lands. Yet this difficulty we hope may be removed by the influence of the Governor of Pennsylvania, who maintains a strict friendship with the Six Nations, whose assistance the correspondents have endeavored to engage in this affair. May he who has the hearts of all men in his hands, open their hearts to receive the Gospel.

I have this winter past had more encouragement among the Indians of Delaware than ever before. A spirit of seriousness and concern has seemed to spread among them, and many of them have been very attentive and desirous of instruction, but I have also met with so many discouragements, that I scarce know what to say. Yet I'm not discouraged, but still hope that the day of divine power will come, wherein they shall become a willing people.

"I long to hear of your affairs, and especially how things are like to turn with regard to your scheme of a free boarding School, which is an affair much upon my heart amidst all my heavy Concerns; and I can hear nothing whether 'tis likely to succeed or not.

"I fully designed to have given Something Considerable for promoting the Good Design;

but whether I shall be able to give anything, or whether 'twill be Duty for me so to do, under present Circumstances, I know not. I have met with sundry losses lately, to the value of 60 or 70 pounds, New England Money. In particular, I broke my Mare's leg last fall in my Journey to Susquehannah, and was obliged to kill her on the road, and prosecute my Journey on foot; and I can't get her place Supplied for 50 pounds. And I have lately moved to have a Colleague or Companion with me, for my Spirits sink with my Solitary Circumstances. And I expect to contribute Considerable to his Maintenance, Seeing his Salary must be gathered wholly in this Country and can't be expected from Scotland.

"I Sold my Tea Kettle to Mr. Jo. Woodbridge, and an Iron Kettle to Mr. Tem. Woodbridge, both which amounted to Something more than four pounds, which I ordered them to pay to you for the school. If that Succeeds, I hope you will use the money that way, if not, you are welcome to it yourself. I desire my Teapot and Bed Ticken may be improved to the same purpose.

"As to my blankets, I desired Mr. Woodbridge to take the trouble of turning them into Deer Skins. If he has not done it, I wish he would, and send the Skins to Mr. Hopkins, or if it might be, to Mr. Bellamy.

"Please to remember me to Maddam, and all friends.

I am, Sir, in greatest haste,

"Your obedient humble servant,
DAVID BRAINERD "

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The spelling, capitals, &c., as they appear in the original MS. have all been preserved, as they will be in letters that may hereafter be published in a similar connection.

THE WILD COLUMBINE.

BY E. G. WHEELER, M. D.

(SEE ENGRAVING.)

CLASS, Polyandria-order, Pentagynia. Natural order of Linnæus, Multisiliquæ-of Jussieu, Helleborinæ.

The systematic name of the wild Columbine, a representation of which embellishes our present number, is Aquilegia Canadensis. Aquilegia is from the Latin aquila, an eagle—its horns or nectaries resembling eagles' claws. Some authors think it more naturally derived from aqua, water, and lego, I gather, the edges of the leaves being slightly rolled upward and inward, so that they retain water.

Generic Description.-Calyx none: petals five, caducous: nectaries five, alternating with the petals, extending a considerable distance beyond the receptacle and terminating in a spur : capsules five, many-seeded; styles permanent. This is according to Prof. Eaton's description, but it would be more proper, perhaps, to consider the corol as a colored calyx, and the nectaries as petals.

Specific Description.-Horns strait; stamens of different length, extending beyond the corol: leaves decompound. The plant is about fifteen inches high, growing in a dry, shallow soil, often in the crevices of rocks. It is found throughout the Northern and Southern States-blossoms in April-flowers red and yellow-nodding.

Medicinal Properties.-Plants found in this natural order are acrid, caustic and poisonous. The seeds of the Aquilegia were formerly used as a remedy in eruptive diseases, and the whole plant was prescribed in the scurvy. Though retained in several of the foreign pharmacopœias, it is not much valued now by physicians in this country.

There are several species of the Aquilegia, all of which are called by the common name of Columbine a name derived from the Latin columbinus, belonging to a dove or pigeon,-so called from the circumstance that the blossoms of some of the species are dove-colored-or perhaps because the flower-stem bends gracefully like the neck of the pigeon when cooing to his mate.

Its sentiment is folly. It appears, at first thought, singular that such a sentiment should be given to this graceful flower, especially when

we consider that its generic name is derived from the noble and victorious eagle, and its common name from the gentle, harmless dove; but we must reflect that the old philosophers, and astronomers, and poets, and naturalists, were men that were moved by the spirit of circumstance and omens-ever seeking after similitudes and naming the objects of their research according to their real or supposed resemblance to other objects. Some think it was given it because the nectaries are formed like the caps of the ancient jesters-others, that it was because it decks itself out in its gaudy apparel of bright red and yellow. We, of course, would not charge any one with folly, who is charmed with high colors in these latter days of refinement and improved taste; nor would we wish to have the fairer flowers that adorn our streets, exchange their dazzling splendor for more sombre hues.

By cultivation, the nectaries of all the species of this plant would, no doubt, become enlarged and multiplied. In the Garden Columbine (Aquilegia Vulgaris) it is interesting to examine these appendages-one hollow horn being contained within another. Sometimes as many as three or four are thus arranged. As all our readers are or have been children, we deem it almost unnecessary to add that these nectaries contain a liquid resembling honey, both in taste and quality. Who has not, in the days of his childhood, gaily bounded along the hill-side, on a sunny April morn, and climbed the rugged rock where the sweet columbine, nodding in the light breeze, invited him to sip nectar from its tiny cups?

Many fond memories and many scenes of sorrow, spring up in the mind, whenever we meet with this early blooming flower. In our youthful May-day rambles, this was the first to be seen. In the garlands we wove, this was the brightest ornament. But, like the flowers that composed those garlands, many a brow they decorated has drooped and faded and pass. ed away for ever. On one May morning we inserted this flower as the most brilliant star in the crown of our "Queen," on the next, we planted it on her grave!

ssing

Aquilegia Canadensia.

THE WILD COLUMBINE.

BY E. G. WHEELER, M. D.

(SEE ENGRAVING.)

CLASS, Polyandria-order, Pentagynia. Natural order of Linnæus, Multisiliquæ-of Jussieu, Helleborinæ.

The systematic name of the wild Columbine, a representation of which embellishes our present number, is Aquilegia Canadensis. Aquilegia is from the Latin aquila, an eagle-its horns or nectaries resembling eagles' claws. Some authors think it more naturally derived from aqua, water, and lego, I gather, the edges of the leaves being slightly rolled upward and inward, so that they retain water.

Generic Description.-Calyx none: petals five, caducous: nectaries five, alternating with the petals, extending a considerable distance beyond the receptacle and terminating in a spur: capsules five, many-seeded; styles permanent. This is according to Prof. Eaton's description, but it would be more proper, perhaps, to consider the corol as a colored calyx, and the nectaries as petals.

Specific Description.-Horns strait; stamens of different length, extending beyond the corol: leaves decompound. The plant is about fifteen inches high, growing in a dry, shallow soil, often in the crevices of rocks. It is found throughout the Northern and Southern States-blossoms in April-flowers red and yellow-nodding.

Medicinal Properties.-Plants found in this natural order are acrid, caustic and poisonous. The seeds of the Aquilegia were formerly used as a remedy in eruptive diseases, and the whole plant was prescribed in the scurvy. Though retained in several of the foreign pharmacopœias, it is not much valued now by physicians in this country.

There are several species of the Aquilegia, all of which are called by the common name of Columbine a name derived from the Latin columbinus, belonging to a dove or pigeon,-so called from the circumstance that the blossoms of some of the species are dove-colored-o perhaps because the flower-stem bends grac fully like the neck of the pigeon when coo to his mate.

Its sentiment is folly. It appears, at thought, singular that such a sentiment s

we consider that its generic name from the noble and victorious e common name from the gentle, h but we must reflect that the ol and astronomers, and poets, were men that were moved by cumstance and omens-ever itudes and naming the objec according to their real or s to other objects. Some because the nectaries are of the ancient jesterscause it decks itself o bright red and yellow not charge any one with high colors in ment and improve to have the fairer exchange their d bre hues. By cultivatio of this plant and multipli (Aquilegia

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