Obrázky na stránke
PDF
ePub

59

59

[ocr errors]

61
64
64
64
66
66
67
69
70
73
74

74
76
77
78
79

79

Voltaire and the Cottager,

Cowper.

The Spanish Armada,

Macaulay.

Hymn before Sunrise in the Vale of

Chamouni,

Coleridge.

How Sleep the Brave,

Collins.

True Beauty,

Spenser.

Oda Bog, or Ode to the Almighty, Ĝ. R. Derzhavin.

The Grasshopper and Cricket,

Keats.

On the same,

Leigh Hunt.

The Dying Sailor,

Crabbe.

The Village Preacher,

Goldsmith

The Skylark,

Shelly.

Hope Triumphant in Death,

Campbell.

Never Despair,

Landor.

The Prisoner of Chillon,

Byron.

I. Death of the Younger Prisoner,

II. The Bird at the Prison Window,

III. The View from the Lattice,

IV. The Liberation,

Address to the Ocean,

Barry Cornwall.

'The Last Minstrel,

Sir Walter Scott.

The Nameless Mountain Stream,

Charles Mackay.

The Lake of the Dismal Swamp,

Thomas Moore.

The Study of Nature,

Martin F. Tupper.

The Faithful Bird,

Cowper.

Christian Patriotism,

Cowper.

The Song of Minona,

Ossian.

Approach of Macbeth's fate,

Shakspere.

Norfolk's Reply to Bolingbroke's charge

of Treason,

Shakspere.

Scene in the Forest of Arden,

Shakspere.

Flattery and Friendship,

Shakspere.

Griffith’s Character of Cardinal Wolsey, - Shakspere.

Soliloquy of Henry IV. on Sleep, Shakspere.

Overthrow of the Rebel Angels,

Milton.

Satan Summoning the Rebel Angels, Milton.

Satan Encountering Sin and Death, Milton.

Eve's Lament, on hearing the Sentence, Milton.

The Expulsion from Paradise,

Milton.

The Death of Lausus,

Dryden's Virgil.

Hector and Andromache,

Pope's Homer.

The Play Place of Early Days,

Cowper.

Contentment,

Burns.

Night,

Southey.

Domestic Happiness,

Coleridge.

The Divine Origin of Man,

Wordsworth.

To my Mother,

Henry Kirke White.

The War-Horse,

Job.

[graphic]

-

-

-

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

-

[ocr errors]

SELECTED POETRY.

HUMILITY.

JAMES MONTGOMERY. Ad-o-ra'tion, n. (L. ad, oro). Ascend, v. (L. ad, scando).

Hu-mil'i-ty, n. (L. humus).
Saint, n. (L. sanctus).

The bird that soars on highest wing,

Builds on the ground her lowly nest;
And she that doth most sweetly sing,

Sings in the shade when all things rest.
-In lark and nightingale we see
What honour hath humility.

When Mary chose the “better part,"'

She meekly sat at Jesus' feet;
And Lydia's gently-opened heart

Was made for God's own temple meet;
-Fairest and best adorn'd is she
Whose clothing is humility.

The saint that wears heaven's brightest crown,

In deepest adoration bends;
The weight of glory bows him down,

Then most when most his soul ascends;
-Nearest the throne itself must be

The footstool of humility. 1. What song-bird soars highest ?

6. What is meant by the “better part ?” 2. Where does the lark build her nest ? 7. In what should we imitate Mary? 3. Which bird sings most sweetly? 8. Under whose preaching did the Lord 4. Where and when does she sing? open Lydia's heart?

5. Of what christian grace do these facts 9. Who, does the poet say, bends lowest afford an illustration ?

in presence of his God.

COMMON THINGS.

MRS HAWKSILAWE.

THE sun is a glorious thing,

That comes alike to all,
Lighting the peasant's lonely cot,

The noble's painted hall.

The moonlight is a gentle thing,

It through the window gleams
Upon the snowy pillow where

The happy infant dreams.
It shines upon the fisher's boat,

Out on the lonely sea ;
Or where the little lambkins lie,

Beneath the old oak tree.
The dew-drops on the summer morn,

Sparkle upon the grass ;
The village children brush them off,

That through the meadows pass.
There are no gems in monarch's crowns,

More beautiful than they ;
And yet we scarcely notice them,

But tread them off in play.
Poor Robin on the pear-tree sings,

Beside the cottage door;
The heath-flower fills the air with sweets,

Upon the pathless moor.
There are as many lovely things,

As many pleasant tones,
For those who sit by cottage-hearths

As those who sit on thrones.

THE DYING BOY.

I knew a boy, whose infant feet had trod
Upon the blossoms of some seven springs,
And when the eighth came round, and called him out
To gambol in the sun, he turned away,
And sought his chamber, to lie down and die !
'Twas night-he summoned his accustomed friends,
And, on this wise, bestowed his last bequest:-

“Mother! I'm dying now-
There is deep suffocation in my breast,
As if some heavy hand my bosom prest;

And on my brow

" I feel the cold sweat stand ; My lips grow dry and tremulous, and my breath Comes feebly up. Oh! tell me, is this death ?

Mother! your hand

“Here-lay it on my wrist, And place the other thus, beneath my head, And say, sweet mother!-say, when I am dead,

Shall I be missed ?

“Never beside your knee Shall I kneel down again at night to pray, Nor with the morning wake, and sing the lay

You taught to me!

“Oh, at the time of prayer, When you look round and see a vacant seat, You will not wait then for my coming feet

You'll miss me there!"

“Father! I'm going home! To the good home you speak of, that blest land Where it is one bright summer always, and

Storms do not come.

“I must be happy then, From pain and death you say I shall be freeThat sickness never enters there, and we

Shall meet again!”

“ Brother !—the little spot I used to call my garden, where long hours We've stayed to watch the budding things and flowers,

Forget it not!

“ Plant there some box or pineSomething that lives in winter, and will be A verdant offering to my memory,

And call it mine!"
“Sister! my young rose tree-
That all the spring has been my pleasant care,
Just putting forth its leaves so green and fair,

I give it thee.

"And when its roses bloom, I shall be gone away-my short life done! But will you not bestow a single one

Upon my tomb ? "

“Now, mother! sing the tune You sang last night, I'm weary and must sleep! Who was it called my name ?- Nay, do not weep,

You'll all come soon! "

Morning spread over earth her rosy wings-
And that meek sufferer, cold and ivory pale,
Lay on his couch asleep! The gentle air
Came through the open window, freighted with
The savoury odours of the early spring-
He breathed it not !--The laugh of passers by
Jarred like a discord in some mornful tune,
But marred not his slumbers-He was dead !

Voltaire and the Cottager,

Corper. The Spanish Armada,

Macaulay. Hymn before Sunrise in the Vale of

Coleridge How sleep the Brare,

Collins. True Beauty, Oda Bog, or Ode to the Almighty, G. P. Derzkaria. The Grasshopper and Cricket,

Kents. On the same

Leigh Hunt. The Dying sailor,

Crabbe. The Village Preacher,

Goldsmith The Skylark,

Shelly. Hope Triumphant in Death,

Carpbell Xerer Despair,

Landor.
The Prisoner of Chillon,

Byron.
I Death of the Younger Prisoner,
IL The Bird at the Prison Window,
IIL, The View from the Lattice,

IV. The Liberation,
Address to the Ocean,

Barry Cornuall. The Last Minstrel,

Sir Walter Scott. The Nameless Mountain Stream,

Charles Mackay. The Lake of the Dismal Swamp,

Thomas Moore. The study of Nature,

Martin F. Tupper. The Faithful Bird,

Cowper. Christian Patriotism,

Согрет. . The song of Minona,

Ossian. Approach of Macbeth's fate,

Shakspere. Norfolk’s Reply to Bolingbroke's charge of Treason,

Shakspere. Scene in the Forest of Arden,

Shakspere. Flattery and Friendship,

Shakspere. Griffith's Character of Cardinal Wolsey, - Shakspere. Soliloquy of Henry IV. on Sleep, Shakspere. Overthrow of the Rebel Angels,

Milton. Satan Summoning the Rebel Angels, Milton. Satan Encountering Sin and Death, Milton. Eve's

Lament, on hearing the Sentence, Milton. The Expulsion from Paradise,

Milton. The Death of Lausus,

Dryden's Virgil. Hector and Andromache,

Pope's Homer. The Play Place of Early Days,

Couper. Contentment,

Burns. Night,

Southey. Domestic Happiness,

Coleridge. The Divine Origin of Man,

Wordsworth. To my Mother,

Henry Kirke Whi The War-Horse,

Job.

[ocr errors]
« PredošláPokračovať »